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  • Thumbnail for Autumn colors in the quiet contermporary Japanese countryside . . .
    Autumn colors in the quiet contermporary Japanese countryside . . .

    Driving back to Morioka City (Iwate Prefecture) from an onsen (hot spring) weekend in the Aomori Prefecture.

  • Thumbnail for Writing Utensil Box with Designs of Hatsuse Mountain Landscape and Monkeys
    Writing Utensil Box with Designs of Hatsuse Mountain Landscape and Monkeys

    In this writing box, the tray below originally held brushes and inksticks. The round metal water-dropper that sits in a depression on the upper left side was used to add some water to the inkstone on which the inkstick was rubbed to make ink. The inkstone also sits in a fitted spce, to keep it from moving around as the inkstick is rubbed on it. The trees on the mountain include hinoki (cypress) tha, along with the cherry tree, are sometimes associated with Hatsuse Mountain in classical poetry. A large applied-silver moon looms from behind the mountain in a cloudless sky. The design on the inside of the lid shows a monkey with its baby reaching for the reflection of the thin-slivered moon in water. - abridged from description by Andrew Pekarik.

  • Thumbnail for Set of Utensils for the Incense Game
    Set of Utensils for the Incense Game

    In the Heian period, the fragrance of aromatic wood was enjoyed by members of court society. The appreciation of incense became formalized in the Muromachi period, and many varieties of monko, literally listening to the incense" were established. Throughout the Edo period, enthusiasts of this widely popular game included members of the warrior class. This set of incense utensils is decorated with such plants and flowers as bush clover, chrysanthemum, peony, camelia, iris, and bamboo arranged in circular motifs in slightly raised gold takamaki-e lacquer." - Suzuki Norio

  • Thumbnail for Sho
    Sho

    A cluster of 17 narrow bamboo pipes (two are decorative only). A type of flute. Has reeds, and can make a variety of chords with up to six different notes. Used mainly in gagaku.

  • Thumbnail for Shakuhachi
    Shakuhachi

    An end-blown bamboo flute that has no reed. Used to accompany folk songs and other traditional music, and also for performances of modern music.

  • Thumbnail for Gambling Mamas
    Gambling Mamas

    Pachinko, a Japanese cousin of the American slot machine, has a wide appeal. The pachinko machines of today are much flashier than the ones shown here from the 60's.

  • Thumbnail for Miyajima Torii
    Miyajima Torii

    This picture is of the famous torii at Miyajima. Miyajima island has been occupied for hundreds of years by emperors and shogun because of it`s beauty and purity. In fact, the government, wanting to maintain the purity of Miyajima, has made it illegal to be born or die on Miyajima. Every day the tide comes in and goes out, allowing the throngs of tourists to poke around on the beach near the base of the gigantic torii. These children were making use of stepping stones, pulling their parents with them.

  • Thumbnail for Seoul nightlife
    Seoul nightlife

    This is a picture of the establishments that come to life in the night. We see that there is a bar/restaurant on the left, billiards and singing on the right, and a Starbucks coffee shop. This is what keeps Seoul entertained. Seoul, South Korea.

  • Thumbnail for Hakone from Fifty-three Famous Places (Gojûsan tsugi meishozue)
    Hakone from Fifty-three Famous Places (Gojûsan tsugi meishozue) by Utagawa (Andô) Hiroshige

    Woodblock print. 13¾" x 9". Paper was issued in the Tokugawa Period (1615-1868) in standard sizes, most prints being in the oban format of 15 x10. The smaller size of this print thus indicates cutting. Condition good with some slight damage and staining in center of the print. Professor Mandancy’s letter identifies the work as one of the Fifty-three Stages of the Tokaidô (Tokaidô gojûsan no uchi), that is the set of 1833-34. Actually the print is from the 1855 set, as properly noted in her original list. The first step in making an Ukiyo-e woodblock print was an artist (eshi) painted a composition in ink on paper. The sketch (or later a copy) was pasted down on a plank of wood (usually cherry) and cut away to create the key or outline block. A separate person from the artist, called the cutter (hori), did the carving. A third person -- the rubber (suri) -- took the carved block and, placing it face up, moistened the printing surfaces by quickly brushing on water and glue. Color and ink were then applied by hand and pre-moistened paper placed onto the wet surface. The rubber then took the print by rubbing from behind with a baren (pad of rope covered by bamboo). It is usually presumed that the key block was used to make the patterns for the color blocks. In old views of Ukiyo-e, the key block, being closest to the sketch by the hand of the artist, was considered the most important. Authenticity, therefore, was mostly a matter of comparing lines in a questioned print to those in published, established, or otherwise accepted examples. If there was a match, the print was “genuine,†and often labeled as such on a tag on the back. The print of Hakone is, moreover, very useful for teaching how to look at lines in Ukiyo-e because those forming the border around the image show gaps and are thin, indicating that the key block was old and worn when the print was taken. The lines in Shinagawa are stronger, an important point in determining the work’s better condition.More interestingly, there is a worn area in the right hand corner of Hakone, where the printed line appears to have been scraped off and then drawn back in. Such repairs are common in Ukiyo-e and a much more obvious example is in the print of Shirasuka in the Union College Collection, by the same artist and from the same series. Shirasuka clearly has been repaired. For instance, there is a hole in its lower half of the print that has been filled in and colored to match the surrounding areas. In the lower right hand corner of Shirasuka, there is a place where the line has been obviously scraped off and then redrawn.

  • Thumbnail for Tobacco pouch with a netsuke (abalone shell motif) (metal clasp detail)
    Tobacco pouch with a netsuke (abalone shell motif) (metal clasp detail)

    The Japanese tradition for clothing accessories did not decline after Western influence arrived in Japan after the 18th century. The only change is that the inro (medicine case) was replaced by the tobacco pouch. Netsuke, a small accessory, functioned as a toggle or button for the wearing of articles, such as a pouch or a purse, on a sash, or obi in Japanese, in traditional Japanese clothing (kimono). It was originally used for an inro, a small medicine case, and was worn by the Japanese men after the 16th century. Inro could also contain a seal stamp and dry fruits for snacks, not only medicine. The art of netsuke reached its peak in the 18th century, and many designs were created during this time. The designs of netsuke varied. They were largely inspired by Japanese folk tales and tradition, ranging from historical and genre figures, to animals and plants. However, later the carvings changed for foreign collectors. Netsuke generally feature realistically executed subjects. Traditionally, the artist’s name would be carved at the bottom of the netsuke.

  • Thumbnail for Two Balinese Shadow Puppets (puppet 1)
    Two Balinese Shadow Puppets (puppet 1)

    Height: 50 cm Material: Gilt wood; one wearing silk shot through with gold over cotton petticoats, the other wearing a cotton dress. Balinese puppets came from the small island of Bali. “They are made of painted leather or wood and adorned with splendid garments, mantles, diadems, necklaces...their expressions are either ecstatic or demonic...These figures represent jinn, demons, heroes, and divinities from Indian mythology and legend†(Encyclopedia of World Art). The Bali puppets at Beeghly Library are not the flat-leather puppets (of wayang-kulit) which performed before screens, but are wayang-golek, “a completely rounded wooden figure that was developed in Java, it is less powerful because it is more photographic†(McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Art).

  • Thumbnail for Sumo Wrestler Defeating a Westerner
    Sumo Wrestler Defeating a Westerner by Ipposai YOSHIFUJI (1828-87)

    Image of Sumo wrestler successfully tossing a westerner while man and woman looking on. Japanese characters are written on the top of the print and the lower right side. One of a series of prints that appeared during the time between the arrival of Commodore Matthew Perry in 1853, and the actual beginning of the Meiji Era (1868-1912).

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 183, Oaks-Heilungten, Yunnan.
    Thorp Collection 183, Oaks-Heilungten, Yunnan.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 164, No Title.
    Thorp Collection 164, No Title.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Skiing
    Skiing

    People skiing during their vacation.

  • Thumbnail for Writing Table and Writing Utensil Box
    Writing Table and Writing Utensil Box

    Bundai (writing table) and suzuribako (writing utensil box) decorated with a combination of bamboo, paulownia, and the phoenix. The background is done using a technique known as nashiji, similar in appearance to the skin of the nashi, or Japanese pear, in which metal flakes are suspended in lacquer.

  • Thumbnail for Store display:  televisions
    Store display: televisions

    Televisions for sale

  • Thumbnail for Magazines
    Magazines

    A few examples of the bright and overstimulating magazines available in Japan seen in a bookstore.

  • Thumbnail for Ewha Women's University shopping district
    Ewha Women's University shopping district

    This is the Ewha Women's university shopping district where a good portion of most shopping dreams are met. Some of the trendiest clothes can be found here for cheap. Also, there are hair salons literally built on top of other hair solons in this area. Seoul, South Korea.

  • Thumbnail for Traditional Korean seesaw
    Traditional Korean seesaw

    This is a traditional seesaw where a board is placed on a mount below (usually a bundle of hay or straw). The people, instead of sitting, stand, and time it so that they jump up and down, making the other person go higher every time.

  • Thumbnail for Bartering in Korea
    Bartering in Korea

    While in the markets, unless it is a name brand store, a shopper can barter down on various prices. Commonly, however, this only used for merchandise such as clothing and shoes, etc. Food is usually not bartered.

  • Thumbnail for Raffles Plaza Hotel
    Raffles Plaza Hotel

    The executive lounge at the Raffles Plaza Hotel, Singapore.

  • Thumbnail for Two Sumo Wrestlers
    Two Sumo Wrestlers by Utagawa TOYOKUNI I (1769-1825)

    14 x 9 inches. Two sumo wrestlers, grappling in the ring.

  • Thumbnail for Sports at West China Union University
    Sports at West China Union University

    Foot races at West China Union University

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 159, Yangtze boats, N. Donting.
    Thorp Collection 159, Yangtze boats, N. Donting.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.