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  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 160, View Fr. Hill Yichang.
    Thorp Collection 160, View Fr. Hill Yichang.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 13, Tsunami wall, Hiraiga.
    Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 13, Tsunami wall, Hiraiga.

    Tsunami wall, Hiraiga. -- Tsunami are large waves caused by vertical displacement of sea water, usually resulting from submarine earthquakes. Destruction results when these waves wash over a shoreline. Their effects are greatest along irregular coastlines with bays that are broaden towards the ocean and narrow inland, such as the Pacific coast of Honshu. Japanese coasts have been affected by at least 72 tsunami in the last hundred years, and inundation heights up to 100 feet are not uncommon. -- Here a concrete wall has been erected in an attempt to protect the small fishing village of Hiraiga from at least small tsunami.

  • Thumbnail for Landscapes of Japan, 16, Rice fields, Mt. Iwate, west of Morioka.
    Landscapes of Japan, 16, Rice fields, Mt. Iwate, west of Morioka.

    Rice fields, Mt. Iwate, west of Morioka. -- Here, competing uses for flat alluvial plains for agriculture and urban expansion are evident. Originally this was all agricultural, but now the growing suburbs of Morioka are encroaching on the land. The volcanic cone of Mt. Iwate rises above the plain.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese house, entryway
    Japanese house, entryway

    The front entrance of my host family’s house. Upon entering the house, family members shout “Tadaima!†(I’m home!) to announce their arrival, and remove their shoes. In the display case on the left are a box of artificial flowers, baskets with travel-size tissue packets, and wooden puzzle-sculptures that my host brother, age 7, had made. On the right, the behind the two closed sliding doors is a compartment where my family stores their winter shoes/boots during the summer, lightweight shoes during the summer to conserve storage space.

  • Thumbnail for Meal at ryokan or "guest houses"
    Meal at ryokan or "guest houses"

    Meals at ryokan (traditional inns, or "guest houses") are elaborate and delicious.

  • Thumbnail for Apartment Entrances
    Apartment Entrances

    Even though Japanese apartments are notoriously small, it's clear that there are some valiant attempts at keeping gardens.

  • Thumbnail for Old Fashioned Way
    Old Fashioned Way

    Around the turn of the century, farmers continued to thatch their roofs despite the modern structures that were being erected in the cities.

  • Thumbnail for Yonsei University hasukchip
    Yonsei University hasukchip

    Many of the universities in Korea are too crowded to take in all of the students in the dorm, so many students rent a room in a student boarding house. This particular boarding house is located less than 40 feet from the entrance to the East Gate of Yonsei University.

  • Thumbnail for Pillow (used by ladies)
    Pillow (used by ladies)

    Cushion resting on a wooden base. This type of pillow can be seen in Japanese prints and paintings of the Edo era (1603-1868 AD), so it is identified as “Japanese,†which differed from Chinese pillows largely made of ceramics. It was used by ladies who rested on the back of their neck to avoid messing up their elaborate hairdos. The drawer at the bottom of the wooden base may have contained personal belongings, including jewelry at some point. Its condition is fine, but the colors of the cushion have faded (the design and pattern on the cushion remain visible).

  • Thumbnail for Chinese flat roof tiles, with relief designs of dragons - fragment
    Chinese flat roof tiles, with relief designs of dragons - fragment

    Earthenware with brightly colored glazes in blue, green, and yellow. Three are round (one of these broken); two have cloud-shaped borders (one is broken). Provenance: Peking

  • Thumbnail for Chinese flat roof tiles, with relief designs of dragons -fragment
    Chinese flat roof tiles, with relief designs of dragons -fragment

    Earthenware with brightly colored glazes in blue, green, and yellow. Three are round (one of these broken); two have cloud-shaped borders (one is broken). Provenance: Peking

  • Thumbnail for Chongqing
    Chongqing

    “I have often thought about the question: ‘What makes a city glamorous?’ Certain cities, Paris, Peiping, New York, San Francisco, have a certain ‘it’ that most cities lack. One of the factors of a city’s appeal, I think, is concerned with geography…On its narrow peninsula where the Chaling joins the Yangtze, Chungking rises on its steep bluffs out of the mists of its rivers.†[17 “On an island in the Yangtze…is the Chungking winter airport…In February’s low water the island was al’ but connected with the Chungking shore.†[21]

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 043, Luofengcheng (the place where the "Phoenix" fell)
    Thorp Collection 043, Luofengcheng (the place where the "Phoenix" fell)

    Luofengcheng (the place where the "Phoenix" fell). This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 088, Guiyang from wall, Guizhou
    Thorp Collection 088, Guiyang from wall, Guizhou

    Guiyang from wall, Guizhou. This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. No. ecasia000072, ""Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing.""

  • Thumbnail for Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 17, Accessibility of natural world in traditional Japanese building style.
    Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 17, Accessibility of natural world in traditional Japanese building style.

    Accessibility of natural world in traditional Japanese building style. -- Over the centuries the constant threat of earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods and tsunami in Japan have produced a culture that emphasizes co-existence with nature rather than the more typical Western approach of trying to overcome or modify the natural world. It is, therefore, not surprising that traditional Japanese buildings have sliding panels that can be opened to allow the outside world to merge with that inside the building. The boundary between inside and outside becomes less well defined and the inside becomes almost an extension of the natural environment.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 152, Northeast from Yuan Men Shan, Shandong.
    Thorp Collection 152, Northeast from Yuan Men Shan, Shandong.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 142, Camphor tree in bank, Hengchow, Hunan.
    Thorp Collection 142, Camphor tree in bank, Hengchow, Hunan.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese house, interior
    Japanese house, interior

    Looking out from the dining/living room of my host family's house into the garden and at the clothesline, where my host grandmother would hang the daily wash out to dry every day. Very traditional-style Japanese house with sliding rice paper doors, but enclosed by modern glass doors to insulate the house.

  • Thumbnail for Room
    Room

    During my homestay I snapped a picture of my room for posterity. Note the tatami mats, futon, space heater, and "desk".

  • Thumbnail for Camels in a 'Ger' encampment
    Camels in a 'Ger' encampment

    Camels in a 'ger' (yurt) encampment, Outer Mongolia.

  • Thumbnail for Four-panel Coromandel folding screen
    Four-panel Coromandel folding screen

    72" x 67". Ebony. The screens usually present complete scenes, often of Chinese life, though European nautical and hunting scenes are not unknown. The Union College Coromandel Screen is unusual in consisting of a series of separate compositions, each a reproduction of a Chinese bird and flower painting, complete with signature. The Union College Coromandel Screen shows such hallmarks of value as a complex design and fine detail. The screen has value in teaching how ukiyo-e cutters transformed paintings into prints. The Union College Coromandel Screen is particularly good for this purpose because it consists, as noted above, of a series of reproductions of paintings. In addition, the Union College Coromandel Screen was carved using the same reductive process employed by ukiyo-e cutters, wherein the surface is cut into and material removed to leave lines and shapes. The feathers of the birds in the Union College Coromandel Screen show just how fine lines can be cut, making these birds an excellent way to understand how ukiyo-e cutters made the spectacular treatments of the women’s long hair in the prints by Kuniyoshi, Kunisada, Eizan, and Eisen.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze vessel
    Bronze vessel

    In ancient Japan (prior to the Meiji era, 1868-1912), metalwork was solely for swords and Buddhist statues. During the Meiji era, a decree abolishing sword-wearing and the restoration of Shintoism, the original religion of Japan, as the national religion caused the making of metalwork to shift to objects for export and home consumption; the functions of objects and subject of decoration tended to be secular. This vase, designed with a style of Chinese bronze vessel, bears 8 different scenes on the entire body. There are four large panels, with subjects ranging from figurative to seascapes, on the main body of the vessel, and four small horizontal scenes, landscapes and seascapes are the subjects (possibly a display of the four seasons), on the bottom. The designs are done in relief. The borders of the panels are also ornamented with plant patterns, chrysanthemums and gingko tree leaves in particular common Japanese floral motif. A great deal of artistic appeal and distinctive styles are the trademark of Meiji metalwork.

  • Thumbnail for Pillow (used by ladies) (side view)
    Pillow (used by ladies) (side view)

    Cushion resting on a wooden base. This type of pillow can be seen in Japanese prints and paintings of the Edo era (1603-1868 AD), so it is identified as “Japanese,†which differed from Chinese pillows largely made of ceramics. It was used by ladies who rested on the back of their neck to avoid messing up their elaborate hairdos. The drawer at the bottom of the wooden base may have contained personal belongings, including jewelry at some point. Its condition is fine, but the colors of the cushion have faded (the design and pattern on the cushion remain visible).

  • Thumbnail for Silver Street in the city of Chengdu
    Silver Street in the city of Chengdu

    Craftsmen engages in the same sort of work usually have shops on the same street. On sliver street, artisans fashion trays, tea services, eating utensils, and delicate filigree jewelry from pure silver…Since the war brought the aluminum skins of airplanes there has sprung up an aluminum street…[68]

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 097, Valley S.W. Tingtan, Guizhou
    Thorp Collection 097, Valley S.W. Tingtan, Guizhou

    Valley S.W. Tingtan, Guizhou. This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. No. ecasia000072, ""Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing.""