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  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 132, Mongols and Yurt- Chahar.
    Thorp Collection 132, Mongols and Yurt- Chahar.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Twenties Ladies
    Twenties Ladies

    The bolder Japanese women of the 1920s imitated the dress of their Western sisters.

  • Thumbnail for Kimono Display
    Kimono Display

    A kimono display at a local department store.

  • Thumbnail for Kimono
    Kimono

    A St Olaf student being dressed in a kimono by her host family. The host mothers were trying to figure out how to tie the obi when this picture was snapped.

  • Thumbnail for Oyoroi or "Great" Armor
    Oyoroi or "Great" Armor

    According to Hosokawa family tradition, this set of armor was worn in a 1358 battle in Kyoto by Hosokawa Yoriari, the founder of the family. Much of the original assemblage hat protects the body has survived: the cuirass and its pendant kusazuri (protective skirt), including the entire waidate (right side guard), and the kyubi no ita, which is suspended from the left shoulder over the chest. The two expansive osode (large upper-arm guards) are replacements dating from the sixteenth century and the sendan no ita, which would have been suspended from the right shoulder over the chest, is missing. The hoshi kabuto (star helmet) is made of narrow trapezoidal iron plates fixed with rows of neatly assembled rivets. The right-hand flap of the shikoro has lost several of its lacquered lames, a reminder of a sword blow during a fierce battle. - abridged from Shimizu, "Japan: The Shaping of Daimyo Culture".

  • Thumbnail for Kosode
    Kosode

    The kosode was the principal Japanese outer robe from the sixteenth century on, having previously served as outer garment for the lower classes and as undergarment for the upper classes. From the kosode evolved the modern kimono. Kosode literally means small sleeves," a reference not to the length or width of the sleeves themselves but to the size of the wrist openings. This kosode is a representative example of the Kanbun style of kosode decoration that was particularly popular during the Kanbun era (1661-1673) of the Edo period. On the back of this kosode, large overlapping maple leaves form the arc across teh shoulders to the right hem, with the red figured satin (rinzu) background exposed on the left." - Kawakami Shigeki

  • Thumbnail for Pink embroidered garment - front view
    Pink embroidered garment - front view

    Traditional Chinese woman's wear. Embroidered silk with side closures.

  • Thumbnail for Marumi Station: Selling the famous product tie-dyed Arimatsu fabrics
    Marumi Station: Selling the famous product tie-dyed Arimatsu fabrics by Utagawa Hiroshige

    From the Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido series, Gyosho Tokaido (named after the calligraphy style used) edition. One of the most well-known 19th century ukiyo-e artists, famous for his landscape views, particularly his images of the Tokaido. This image was originally a part of architect Frank Lloyd Wright’s collection of Japanese woodblock prints. It along with 36 others came to the Wriston from a benefactor who received them from Wright in lieu of a payment for printing services. Many of the prints have Wright’s handwritten notations in the margins. Though many of the Wright works in our collection are of lesser quality, the images serve as an example of the interest in Asian art that so informed Wright’s architecture. As the busiest highway in the 18th and early 19th centuries, the Tokaido offered numerous chances to experience a variety of social classes and day-to-day activities. Numerous images of this highway were created during the Edo period, some in singular views and others in series, the most famous of which are Hiroshige’s numerous editions. The images depicted the commercial activity along the road and famous views seen on the journey. Hiroshige, in particular, also chose many of the views based on varying times of year and the weather conditions that offered an ever-changing impression of the landscape. Greatly influenced by his teacher Utagawa Toyoharu, Hiroshige often employed perspective views rather than the more traditional stacked and flattened views of the landscape found in the Kano school of painting. This slightly more western view helps to explain his popularity among 19th century artists in Europe. Narumi station was number 40.

  • Thumbnail for Lotus shoe for bound feet (toe detail)
    Lotus shoe for bound feet (toe detail)

    This shoe has never been worn, as the sole is intact and clean and its heels also bear nice needlework. Although the colors and fabrics have either faded or worn out, the stitching is refined. The motifs are often associated with auspicious symbolism (fertility) in addition to its aesthetic quality. The custom of women’s foot-binding has been documented before the 10th century in China, and was officially abolished in the Qing dynasty (1645-1911). However, Chinese women continued to accept this torment as a social norm. The foot-binding custom was not completely extinguished until the 1950s and 60s in China under enforcement from Christian missionaries and foreign military in the 1890s.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Bronze T'ao T'ie Mask Belt Hook (back)
    Chinese Bronze T'ao T'ie Mask Belt Hook (back)

    2" w. Cast with projecting brows, scrolled horns and large scrolled ears, loop handle below a protruding nose which is flanked by hooked fangs, incised with fur markings, traces of gilding present.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Bronze Inlaid Belt Hook (front)
    Chinese Bronze Inlaid Belt Hook (front)

    7 1/2" l. Beveled and arced spatula form terminating in a bird's head hook, inlaid with gold and turquoise forming an intricate series of lozenge-shaped panels enclosing hook and scroll motifs in gold wire against a turquoise ground.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Bronze Belt Hook (back)
    Chinese Bronze Belt Hook (back)

    3" l. Oval medallion form cast in relief a striding lion bordered by a rope twist band, terminating in a dragon's head hook.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Ivory Pieces (top view)
    Chinese Ivory Pieces (top view)

    Three different works, all smaller than two inches square, hung on cords. The outer two works represent lotuses, one open and one closed. The middle piece is a miniature mountain scene.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Ivory Pieces (side view)
    Chinese Ivory Pieces (side view)

    Three different works, all smaller than two inches square, hung on cords. The outer two works represent lotuses, one open and one closed. The middle piece is a miniature mountain scene.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Lady's Changfu (third level informal court attire) robe with designs of flowers, bats, waves, butterflies, and clouds (front)
    Chinese Lady's Changfu (third level informal court attire) robe with designs of flowers, bats, waves, butterflies, and clouds (front)

    Roundels contain auspicious imagery--peonies and bats; bats are also featured in the wave pattern hem; and bats, flowers, and butterflies float freely outside the roundels on the front and back of the garment. Plain weave pale green satin ground with sections of dark blue ground on the sleeve; red, blue, yellow and orange satin stitch and seed (Peking) stitch silk thread embroidery. Length: 126 cm; sleeve length: 74 cm length. The ground color was probably originally darker, closer to turquoise. This garment is typical of its type in that it mimics the shape of men's garments. It was made for wives of officials who were required to wear the same type garments as their husbands. Both have eight roundels with embroidered designs, three in front, three in back, and one on each shoulder. The sleeves are cut wide and have bands filled with embroidered patterns between the large cuffs and the shoulders. Women's robes are distinguished from those worn by men by their high side slits and by their decorative motifs, as here, dominated by flowers, bats, and butterflies.

  • Thumbnail for Handscroll: Treatise on Samurai Armor - section six
    Handscroll: Treatise on Samurai Armor - section six

    Watercolor on paper with gold border on top and bottom of scroll, depicting drawing of parts of samurai's armor including helmet.

  • Thumbnail for Rinden Kanost Collection, Yi-Lolos people:  Young mother and child
    Rinden Kanost Collection, Yi-Lolos people: Young mother and child

    Description by Arthur Rinden: "This young mother is wearing the typical folded cloth hat worn by Lolo women. The strings of colored beads are suspended from sizable holes in the center of her ears. The silver bangles are hung from holes in the lobes of her ears. The silver was obtained as ransom money received from freeing captured Chinese."

  • Thumbnail for Kimono Fabric
    Kimono Fabric

    A beautiful black kimono.

  • Thumbnail for Dobuku or Short Jacket
    Dobuku or Short Jacket

    The dobuku was a short jacket worn by high-ranking samurai from the late Muromachi to early Edo periods. This example is made of leather and has seven white leather paulownia crests appliqued to the front and back.

  • Thumbnail for Emancipated Woman
    Emancipated Woman

    This photo of a Japanese woman shows how the trendy went for Victorian feathers and flowers, bustles, and bows.

  • Thumbnail for Kimono Display
    Kimono Display

    Some kimono fabric on display.

  • Thumbnail for Red Bridal Outfit
    Red Bridal Outfit

    This garment would be worn at a wedding, and carries the auspicious 'double happiness' character in the center. Red is common for wedding gowns in China historically since it is considered a lucky color.

  • Thumbnail for Mandarin square
    Mandarin square

    Embroidered square patch worn on front of mandarin civil servant garment to denote rank of wearer.

  • Thumbnail for Small black shoes
    Small black shoes

    Shoes for bound feet approximately 3 inches in length.

  • Thumbnail for Man's beaded jacket-back view
    Man's beaded jacket-back view by Chief Tonkaling

    Man's beaded jacket made of abaca fiber. From Mindanao.