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  • Thumbnail for Linguistic ideologies and patterns of code switching in the Piedmont speech community : an analysis of regional dialect versus standard Italian usage and the question of dialect’s future
    Linguistic ideologies and patterns of code switching in the Piedmont speech community : an analysis of regional dialect versus standard Italian usage and the question of dialect’s future by Day, Brenna Kathleen

    This thesis explores the ideologies behind dialect versus standard Italian usage in the Piedmont speech community in northern Italy, and analyses possibilities for the community's linguistic future through research into Italian history, linguistic theory, and face-to-face interviews with members of this unique speech community.

  • Thumbnail for Chicana/o language, culture, and history : identity construction and self-representation of Mexican-Americans
    Chicana/o language, culture, and history : identity construction and self-representation of Mexican-Americans by Steeler, Elizabeth

    The following research concerning Chicana/o identity formation and self-representation was conducted at The Colorado College throughout November and December of 2011, and January and February of 2012. Not only are established theories on identity and culture utilized but research case studies and other ethnographies on the subject of Chicana/o language and culture are also examined in the following project. Along with this review of existing frameworks I examine Chicana/o culture and language through the analysis of various works of Chicana/o literature. Using these assorted resources, I show how Chicana/o language, culture, and history give structure to the identities of Mexican-Americans living in the United States. Research on this specific topic is important because immigration from Mexico is on the forefront of the political arena in the United States. The prevalence of Mexican-Americans living in the United States is encouraging important changes in economic and institutional policies. In order to make these changes, there must be knowledge of the Chicana/o language, culture, and history. How these concepts shape the identities of Mexican Americans is integral in understanding the specific policies that have been, and will continue to affect Chicanas/os all over the United States. My research will help bring this information into the public and academic spheres as well as demonstrate the roles that language, culture, and history play in shaping identity and creating a representation of oneself.