Colorado College Logo

  DigitalCC

Use AND (in capitals) to search multiple keywords.
Example: harmonica AND cobos

8 hits

  • Thumbnail for How strategy affects performance
    How strategy affects performance

    This study examines the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and financial performance, but more specifically, the effects of CSR engagement strategy on cost of equity. The Sample is a panel dataset of 30 firms in the apparel, retail, and textile industry from 2007-2013. Using Fixed-effects, random-effects, and ordinary least squares models, the study finds no significant effect of CSR or CSR engagement strategy on cost of equity. These findings are in line with the majority of existing literature, such that the results indicate no clear relationship between CSR and financial performance exits.

  • Thumbnail for A Brand New World – The Effect of Brand Equity on the Purchase Intent of Consumers who are Willing to buy from Companies with a Demonstrated Commitment to Sustainability
    A Brand New World – The Effect of Brand Equity on the Purchase Intent of Consumers who are Willing to buy from Companies with a Demonstrated Commitment to Sustainability by Khatri, Niyanta

    The emergence of a corporate culture of investments in sustainability has presented many opportunities and challenges in understanding consumer behavior. In a world of choices, the reasons consumers purchase one product over another can be driven by a multitude of factors. One central tenet affecting the environmentally conscious consumers’ Purchase Intent (PI) towards a company that may or may not demonstrate the same environmental ideas as them lies in the company’s Brand Equity. The assumption is that strong relationships between consumers and the brand equity they place on companies help create stronger, more favorable brand associations, improving brand preference and consequently influencing levels of consumer acceptance. So even though, there is a growing evidence that consumers’ PI are highly correlated with companies that demonstrate a sustainability component, by integrating the literature on Brand Equity and Brand Preferences, this paper hopes to investigate how then does Brand Equity affect consumers’ PI towards companies with a demonstrated commitment to sustainability?

  • Thumbnail for YOU CANNOT RUN AWAY FROM TV: CHILDHOOD OBESITY PERPETUATED BY ADVERTISEMENTS, REGARDLESS OF EXERCISE HABITS
    YOU CANNOT RUN AWAY FROM TV: CHILDHOOD OBESITY PERPETUATED BY ADVERTISEMENTS, REGARDLESS OF EXERCISE HABITS by Davis, Danielle Hilton

    There is evidence suggesting that food advertising causes childhood obesity. The strength of this effect is unclear. This study attempts to estimate how much of the childhood obesity prevalence is attributable to unethically constructed food advertisements on television (TV), and argues that watching child-oriented TV, with regularly programmed advertisements, is the most impactful predictor of childhood obesity. A survey was distributed to parents of 5- to 13-year-old US children, asking information about their children’s TV watching habits, eating and exercise habits, height and weight, as well as many other questions. Model input was based on body measurements from the survey, the CDC-2015 cut-offs for weight categories, and literature that relates advertising to consumption and consumption to body mass. The model predicts that reducing the exposure of general TV watching per week by 1 hour would decrease the average logged BMI by 4.6%. If one were to exclusively watch commercial free child-oriented programming (Netflix for example), the model predicts a drop in logBMI of .02% with every additional hour. Several variables were controlled for including: exercise per day, age of child, child and adult-directed TV per day (hours), commercial free TV per week (hours), fruits consumed per week, vegetables consumed per week, sweets consumed per week, soft-drinks consumed per week and socioeconomic status. This study suggests that a healthier TV choice is one that is entirely free of unethically manufactured advertisements. If corporations were to limit exposing children to the marketing of their energy dense, high sugar and sodium products, this could contribute significantly to making children’s diets healthier.

  • Thumbnail for The Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility on Corporate Financial Performance
    The Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility on Corporate Financial Performance by Hansen, Matthew

    The current literature analyzing Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Corporate Financial Performance (CFP) has not shown a definitive correlation. This study attempts to determine whether implementing CSR into a company’s core business policy will show positive, negative, or neutral returns. The model in this study was based on CSR-Hub’s ratings to find any relationship between three different financial measurements: return on assets (ROA), return on equity (ROE), and earnings per share (EPS) through the years 2012-2015. This study uses total employees to control for the size of various companies, a year dummy to control for economic factors within each year, and the company’s beta to control for risk. Based on the results of this study, companies will be able to make an educated decision on whether implementing CSR into its core business policies will be financially beneficial.

  • Thumbnail for  You Cannot Run Away From TV: Childhood Obesity Perpetuated by Advertisements, Regardless of Exercise Habits
    You Cannot Run Away From TV: Childhood Obesity Perpetuated by Advertisements, Regardless of Exercise Habits by Davis, Danielle Hilton

    There is evidence suggesting that food advertising causes childhood obesity. The strength of this effect is unclear. This study attempts to estimate how much of the childhood obesity prevalence is attributable to unethically constructed food advertisements on television (TV), and argues that watching child-oriented TV, with regularly programmed advertisements, is the most impactful predictor of childhood obesity. A survey was distributed to parents of 5- to 13-year-old US children, asking information about their children’s TV watching habits, eating and exercise habits, height and weight, as well as many other questions. Model input was based on body measurements from the survey, the CDC-2015 cut-offs for weight categories, and literature that relates advertising to consumption and consumption to body mass. The model predicts that reducing the exposure of general TV watching per week by 1 hour would decrease the average logged BMI by 4.6%. If one were to exclusively watch commercial free child-oriented programming (Netflix for example), the model predicts a drop in logBMI of .02% with every additional hour. Several variables were controlled for including: exercise per day, age of child, child and adult-directed TV per day (hours), commercial free TV per week (hours), fruits consumed per week, vegetables consumed per week, sweets consumed per week, soft-drinks consumed per week and socioeconomic status. This study suggests that a healthier TV choice is one that is entirely free of unethically manufactured advertisements. If corporations were to limit exposing children to the marketing of their energy dense, high sugar and sodium products, this could contribute significantly to making children’s diets healthier.

  • Thumbnail for An Event Analysis of Corporate Social Responsibility Ratings on Stock Prices
    An Event Analysis of Corporate Social Responsibility Ratings on Stock Prices by Khoo, Adelynn

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) and its effects on firms who choose to practice it is a growing topic of contention in the economics field. However, much of the studies previously done on the CSR and financial performance (CFP) relationship have been inconclusive. In this research, I used Thomas Reuter’s ESG ratings of CSR to do an event analysis of 100 different firms’ stock prices spanning a time period of ten years, 2007 to 2015. By looking at the percent change in CSR ratings and the percent change in stock prices on the day of ratings announcement, we can account for other factors that affect stock performance and isolate the influence of corporate social responsibility on stock prices. Results of multiple different regression models and robustness checks supported my hypothesis for a positive corporate social performance (CSP) and CFP relationship, in accordance with Stakeholder theory. Specifically, the environmental, social, and ESG ratings had a significant positive impact on stock price. Although the results show a positive relationship between corporate social responsibility and stock performance, the model was not the best fit for the data and therefore further research is necessary. With a more thorough understanding of the CSR-CFP relationship, firms can act accordingly and more efficiently, while ultimately improving their communities’ quality of life.

  • Thumbnail for An Event Analysis of Corporate Social Responsibility Ratings on Stock Prices
    An Event Analysis of Corporate Social Responsibility Ratings on Stock Prices by Khoo, Adelynn

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) and its effects on firms who choose to practice it is a growing topic of contention in the economics field. However, much of the studies previously done on the CSR and financial performance (CFP) relationship have been inconclusive. In this research, I used Thomas Reuter’s ESG ratings of CSR to do an event analysis of 100 different firms’ stock prices spanning a time period of ten years, 2007 to 2015. By looking at the percent change in CSR ratings and the percent change in stock prices on the day of ratings announcement, we can account for other factors that affect stock performance and isolate the influence of corporate social responsibility on stock prices. Results of multiple different regression models and robustness checks supported my hypothesis for a positive corporate social performance (CSP) and CFP relationship, in accordance with Stakeholder theory. Specifically, the environmental, social, and ESG ratings had a significant positive impact on stock price. Although the results show a positive relationship between corporate social responsibility and stock performance, the model was not the best fit for the data and therefore further research is necessary. With a more thorough understanding of the CSR-CFP relationship, firms can act accordingly and more efficiently, while ultimately improving their communities’ quality of life.

  • Thumbnail for Are Corporations Incentivized to Provide Gender-Neutral Parental Leave?
    Are Corporations Incentivized to Provide Gender-Neutral Parental Leave? by Bengston, Onyx

    The purpose of this study is to add to the literature of CSR research in hopes of filling a gap about the impact of equitable parental leave on financial performance, laying a foundation to fill other CSR-CFP gaps. Gender-neutral parental leave is discussed as a solution to the crippling effects of unequal parental leave policies on both the labor market and companies who seek top talent. To determine whether companies are incentivized to provide a gender-neutral parental leave policy, a two-model approach was used. First, the Leave Impact Model which analyzes the relationship between employee perspectives, including the presence of equitable parental leave, and a company’s ranking in Forbes’ Top 100 Best Places to work in 2018. Then, the Rank Impact Model which analyzes the relationship between that rank and a company’s financial performance using a modified Three Factor Model by Fama and French. The combination of the two results would offer a link between equitable parental leave and financial performance. However, this study is exemplary of the CSR research to date, finding no significance between the presence of equitable parental leave and a company’s financial performance. As such, no claim as to whether companies are incentivized to provide gender-neutral parental leave on the basis of financial performance can be made. Thus, further CSR research and more adequate CSR definitions and data are of paramount importance.