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13 hits

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Bronze Knife (back)
    Chinese Bronze Knife (back)

    7" l. The scimitar-form coin is cast in thread relief with a line border, three horizontal lines towards the tip, archaic characters above, two vertical lines on the stem and terminating in a ring.

  • Thumbnail for ATM, close-up 1
    ATM, close-up 1

    A closer look at a Japanese ATM.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Bronze Knife (front)
    Chinese Bronze Knife (front)

    7" l. The scimitar-form coin is cast in thread relief with a line border, three horizontal lines towards the tip, archaic characters above, two vertical lines on the stem and terminating in a ring.

  • Thumbnail for ATM, close-up 2
    ATM, close-up 2

    A closer look at a Japanese ATM.

  • Thumbnail for Currency:  100 Taibi, back
    Currency: 100 Taibi, back

    Back of 100 Taibi note.

  • Thumbnail for Rinden Kanost Collection, China in the 1930s:  Street Market
    Rinden Kanost Collection, China in the 1930s: Street Market

    Arthur Rinden's description: On the street is the daily market for vegetables, fish, and other things. Note that the buyer carries his own scale balances. There were 7 different scales in use in 1927. It was important that the food scales were used for food! Now, all scales are standardized by the national government, as is the money. When we came to China [1927] it was issued by the nation, the province, and even by local stores or pawnshops. Metal coins were 'rung' to learn if they were silver or counterfeits!"

  • Thumbnail for Currency:  100 Hong Kong Dollars, Front
    Currency: 100 Hong Kong Dollars, Front

    Front of a bill denoting 100 Hong Kong dollars. The current rate of exchange [2000] makes this bill equivalent to approximately $12.50 US.

  • Thumbnail for Commercial weights of bronze alloy
    Commercial weights of bronze alloy

    Initially identified as ancient ""Siamese"" stone weights. They are obviously not stone but metal. Subject matter and style suggest that they may have come from South India or Sri Lanka. Analogous temple carving style make dating difficult. One is a hamsa (celestial bird), the other represents a composite creature commonly called a yali. The yali is much more worn than the hamsa, suggesting greater age. They are in a simple yet refined style, adding an aesthetic touch to routine commercial transactions dependent upon standardized measures. They do not appear to be from the same set, but from the same tradition and system. It would be interesting to compare the weights of the two. The strong, abstract modeling of these items, especially of the yali, are likely to appeal to modern sculptural tastes.

  • Thumbnail for ATM
    ATM

    A complex machine, designed to give you money.

  • Thumbnail for Money Tray
    Money Tray

    Because of the negative associations the Japanese have with directly handling money, they use trays like these to place money in and hand to the customer/clerk. Photograph taken at Hokkaido Post Office.

  • Thumbnail for Dao Coin with Circular Top
    Dao Coin with Circular Top

    Dao are early coins made in the shape of weapons, datable to the 1st c BCE to the 1st century CE. Material: cast metal alloy. 7.5 cm in total length; handle is 1.2 cm in width and the circular top is 2.6 cm in width. This is an example of early coinage that was issued while the economy evolved from a barter to an monetary economy. Bronze knives and bronze spades were common barter items in ancient China, but a bit awkward or hazardous to carry around to trade. Some of China's first coins were made to look like a knife or like a stylized spade, so that people would think of them as money, however they were too thin and fragile to be used for anything but money. The knife coin and the spade coin developed in different areas of China about the same time. This knife coin is called the "Ming" after the city where it was made (not the dynasty that was much later).

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Dao Coin with ancient script
    Chinese Dao Coin with ancient script

    Dao are early coins made in the shape of weapons, datable to between the first century BCE to the first century CE. Material: cast metal alloy. Size: 11 X 2.2 cm. Contains script that appears to be a descendant of oracle bone script, the earliest form of Chinese writing. This is an example of early coinage that was issued while the economy evolved from a barter to an monetary economy. Bronze knives and bronze spades were common barter items in ancient China, but a bit awkward or hazardous to carry around to trade. Some of China's first coins were made to look like a knife or like a stylized spade, so that people would think of them as money, however they were too thin and fragile to be used for anything but money. The knife coin and the spade coin developed in different areas of China about the same time. This knife coin is called the ""Ming"" after the city where it was made (not the dynasty that was much later).

  • Thumbnail for Commercial weights of bronze alloy
    Commercial weights of bronze alloy

    Initially identified as ancient "Siamese" stone weights. They are obviously not stone but metal. Subject matter and style suggest that they may have come from South India or Sri Lanka. Analogous temple carving style make dating difficult. One is a hamsa (celestial bird), the other represents a composite creature commonly called a yali. The yali is much more worn than the hamsa, suggesting greater age. They are in a simple yet refined style, adding an aesthetic touch to routine commercial transactions dependent upon standardized measures. They do not appear to be from the same set, but from the same tradition and system. It would be interesting to compare the weights of the two. The strong, abstract modeling of these items, especially of the yali, are likely to appeal to modern sculptural tastes.