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  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 14  --  "Injured dying one after the next, people looking for family"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 14 -- "Injured dying one after the next, people looking for family" by Anonymous

    Injured dying one after the next, people looking for familyured d -- Explanation by the Artist: king fMorning, noon and night, the injured died. White medicines applied [to] burns made pores look bright red. Many were carrying huge loads, calling out, searching for parents, siblings, friends. Relief teams called, 'Anyone here from such and such neighborhood?' I think it was about the 8th when three young soldiers saluted and left. After they left, we heard they were suicide troops sent in from Etajima island. -- The artist was 19 at the time of the bombing, 49 at the time he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 10  --  "Mother burned black covering her baby under her chest."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 10 -- "Mother burned black covering her baby under her chest." by Taguchi, Mitsuko

    Mother burned black covering her baby under her chest. -- Explanation by Artist: "She was lying in the middle of the road, where she had died trying to get away carrying her child. Her hair was standing on end and her baby was under her chest, as if still alive. Her eyes were wide open, I still can't forget that shocking sight."The scene depicted ws 1,000 meters from the hypocenter, in front of Hiroshima Central Broadcasting Station, Kaminagarekawa-cho (now Nobori-cho). Artist was 30 at the time of the bombing, 60 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 17  --  "Many names written in charcoal on a wall"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 17 -- "Many names written in charcoal on a wall" by Matsumoro, Kazuo

    Many names written in charcoal on a wall -- Explanation by the artist: "Part of the wall at Takeya Elementary School. The names of missing people were written in charcoal by those looking for them. 'Hisako Nishimura - tell me where your are - Mother' 'Kazuko, come here' 'Toshie Mitsutani is OK' 'Ippei Masuda, Miyoko is OK, going to Mukaihara' 'Father, Mother both OK, come to Hijiyama Gobenden.' " -- 1,280 m from the hypocenter, Takeya Elementary School, Takara-machi. The artist was 32 at the time of the bombing, 61 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 27 -- "...fleeing the fire"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 27 -- "...fleeing the fire" by Matsumoto, Masao

    People fleeing the fire, The 6th around 8:40 a.m. 1,300m from the hypocenter, Near the Yokogawa Bridge. The heat rays ignited the wooden bridge. All around the neighborhood was a sea of fire. As the conflagration grew, it generated frequent fire storms that greatly increased the momentum of the flames. The blaze bore down on the fleeing survirors.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 25 -- "Sea of flame..."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 25 -- "Sea of flame..." by Nakano, Kenichi

    Sea of flame near the hypocenter, Afternoon of the 6th. -- The scene at the Aioi Bridge, 300 meteres from the hypocenter. Flames totally engulfed the area near the hypocenter and countless victims lay on the ground. Beginning shortly after the blast, the city burned all day and into the night.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Memory -- Locks of hair
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Memory -- Locks of hair

    These locks of hair belonged to a first year student at Aki Girls High School, Teruko Aotani, who was 13 years old. She was working at a demolition site 900 m from the hypocenter, Koami-cho. She was severely burned over her entire body by the blast, but still managed somehow to return to her home, where her mother cared for her until she died in the morning of the 7th, the day following the blast. Her mother cut these locks of hair, some of which are singed, as a keepsake. (Donated by Masae Himuro.) Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 04  --   " Father appearing from under the roof tiles holding my sister".
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 04 -- " Father appearing from under the roof tiles holding my sister". by Kanachika, Mamoru

    Father appearing from under the roof tiles holding my sister -- Explanation by Artist: "My father, my younger sister and I were completely buried under our collapsed house. My mother ran half-crazed around the house calling our names but got no answer. I don't know how much time passed, but at one point the roof tiles began to rattle and move. Then father, holding me under one arm and my sister under another, appeared at the surface. He looked like Nio, the guard of heaven. My mother always said that she was never happier before or since." The scene depicted was 1,300 meters from the hypocenter, tenme-cho. Artist was 2 at the time of the bombing, 59 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 11  --  "Children crying as they looked at the red sky."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 11 -- "Children crying as they looked at the red sky." by Yoneo, Yoshiko

    Children crying as they looked at the red sky. -- Explanation by the Artist: "What? Whose mother is this?" Looking at the crimson sky over Hiroshima and thinking of their parents, evacuated children were sobbing. Eventually, someone's mother arrived at the temple steps looking like an old rag. She described the situation in Hiroshima and spoke the names of other parents she had met. She also told the names of some parents that would never be returning." The scene depicted was 19.5 km from the hypocenter, Obayashi Lecture Center, Obayashi-mura, Asa-gun (now Obayashi Asakita-ku) Artist was 10 at the time of the bombing, 39 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 18  --  "A line of burned lunchboxes"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 18 -- "A line of burned lunchboxes" by Takeuchi, Isamu

    A line of burned lunchboxes, Art -- Exlpanation by the artist: buriedAfter morning assembly, they were probably doing calisthenics. They seemed to be junior high students. I wonder where the owners of these lunchboxes were, laid out so neatly. Because this drill ground was near the hypocenter, the lost lunchboxes were burned but still retained their shape, which makes my heart ache. Thinking of the kindness and love some mother put into each, for them to become last lunches. . . -- 360 m from the hypocenter, Western Drill Ground, Moto-machi. The artist was 25 at the time of the bombing, 82 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 07  --   "Mother and child begging for water."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 07 -- "Mother and child begging for water." by Tasaka, Hajime

    Mother and child begging for watery Surv -- Explanation by the Artist: eggingIn front of Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital, a badly burned mother, a child too weak to stand. Big burn blisters cover their bodies, their hair is singed. 'Water, water please.' the mother weakly begs of passers-by. -- The scene depicted was 1,500 meters from the hypocenter, in front of Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital, Senda-machi 1-chome. The artist was 15 at the time of the bombing, 45 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 13  --  "A-bombed woman searching for family."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 13 -- "A-bombed woman searching for family." by Akashi, Masanobu

    A-bombed woman searching for family. -- Expalnation by the Artist: " An A-bombed woman searching for her family west entrance, Hiroshima Station." The scene depicted was 1,900 meters fro the hypocenter, west entrance of Hiroshima Station, Matsubara-cho. Artist was 19 at the time of the bombing, 76 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 15  --  "Searching"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 15 -- "Searching" by Takeuchi, Isamu

    Searching -- Explanation by the artist: "Bodies lined up along the road for pick-up." The artist was 25 at the time of the bombing, 82 at the time when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 26 -- "Trapped in a fallen house..."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 26 -- "Trapped in a fallen house..." by Matsumuro, Kazuo

    Trapped in a fallen house, this mother and child were surrounded by fire and calling for help. August 6, around 9:00 am, Tanaka-machi, about 1,000 meters from the hypocenter.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 22  --  "Finding a husband by his leather belt"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 22 -- "Finding a husband by his leather belt" by Ogasawara, Shodo

    Finding a husband by his leather belturvivo -- Explanation by the artist: his leA woman (perhaps 34 or 35) with a baby on her back brought what seemed to be her mother-in-law, a woman of about 60, to the place where bodies were being kept. She had spent two days searching the city fruitlessly for her husband. All of the bodies were black from soot and dirt and terribly swollen. 'This leather belt is definitely my husband's. The face is also similar. I'm sure it's him.' A reunion of tears. -- 1290m from the hypocenter, on the grounds of Sumiyoshi Shrine, Kako-machi (now Sumiyoshi-cho). The artist was 17 at the time of the bombing, 74 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 05  --  "Fleeing with children from the ferocious fire"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 05 -- "Fleeing with children from the ferocious fire" by Ishizu, Kazuhiro

    Fleeing with children from the ferocious fire 05 - -- Explanation by the Artist: ferociWith the fire licking in ever closer, driven by desparate fear of death, I dug myself out. Buildings on both sides had tumbled into the road. I thought a bomb had exploded right over my head, but the whole city was burning feriously. Nearby I heard a voice screaming in desperate pain, calling for help. A person was trapped under a large tree. He screamed in agony as he burned slowly from the feet up. -- The scene depicted was 1,380 meters from the hypocenter, near Kyobashi Bridge. The artist was 37 at the time of the bombing, 66 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 16  --  "Searching for mother among the straw mats"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 16 -- "Searching for mother among the straw mats" by Kuwamoto, Katsuko

    Searching for mother among the straw mats -- Explanation by the artist: "My mother, who lived in HIroshima, was missing so my aunt and I (I was 6 years old), who had been at an evacuation site, went to the riverbank near Misasa. We searched for her under the straw mats covering the many people who had breathed their last on the riverbank. One face was swollen reddish copper, but was still white around the eyes (probably where glasses had reflected the heat ray). Under the mid-summer sun, the stench was unbearable." -- The artist was 6 at the time of the bombing, 63 at the time when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 21  --  "Sister, holding brother grown cold"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 21 -- "Sister, holding brother grown cold" by Tagashira, Tadayuki

    Sister holding brother grown cold -- Explanation by the artist: "This girl went out searching for her younger brother in the morning. About two hours before this picture, she found him. 'I want water! I want water!' he said, so she gave him some. He drank it happily. 'Sister, sister, I'm cold! I'm cold!' he said, so she held him. His body gradually grew colder and colder, then he breathed his last." -- 900m from the hypocenter, in front of the main gate of the Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital. The artist was 43 at the time of the bombing, 72 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 06  --   " Parents and crying child, wandering aimlessly.
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 06 -- " Parents and crying child, wandering aimlessly. by Abe, Hatsuko

    Parents and crying child wandering aimlessly -- Explanation by Artist: " My husband's skin peeled off because of the burn. I held my babywith a broken arm. Blood covered our heads and faces. Skin from our faces and our arms dangled. Barefoot, clothes torn to shreds. "Don't cry. Don't cry. When your cry, I get sad." "Waahhh! Waahhh! (give me the breast)" " I haven't eaten since morning. My milk has dried up. Poor thing." "Waa, Waa." Artist was 24 at the time of the bombing, 81 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 03  --  "I couldn't get my grandmother out"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 03 -- "I couldn't get my grandmother out" by Yamada, Ichiro

    I couldn't get my grandmother out -- Explanation by Artist: "I am running away from my grandmother without answering her. I had only a second to get out. There was nothing I could do. I wish at least I has answered her. It's so sad I never wanted to tell anyone this story. There is no way to atone for this sin." Artist was 18 at the time of the bombing, 75 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 19  --  "Mother and me joyfully reuniting in the ruins"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 19 -- "Mother and me joyfully reuniting in the ruins" by Furui, Natsuko

    Mother and me joyfully reuniting in the ruins -- Explanation by the artist: "Looking for my mother, I searched among the crowds of people trudging out of the city. Then, ahead of me I noticed my mother walking my way in her underwear and with blood on her shoulder. 'Mother!!' We held each other and cried by the side of the road. My mother had been trapped under the house, unable to get out, but neighbors freed her. It was a miracle. If we hadn't met then, I would have spent the whole night wandering through the rubble and smoke looking for her." -- The artist was 22 at the time of the bombing, 78 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Memory -- A child's tricycle
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Memory -- A child's tricycle

    Shinichi Tetsutani (then 3 years and 11 months) loved to ride this tricycle. That morning, he was riding in front of his house when, in a sudden flash, he and his tricycle were badly burned. He died that night. His father felt he was too young to be buried in a lonely grave away from home, and thinking he could still play with the tricycle, he buried Shinichi with the tricycle in the backyard. -- In the summer of 1985, forty years later, his father dug up Shinichi's remains and transferred them to the family grave. -- This tricycle and helmet, after sleeping for 40 years in the backyard with Shinichi, were donated to the Peace Memorial Museum. (Donated by Nobuo Tetsutani.) 1500 meters from the hypocenter, Higashi-hakushima-cho.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Memory -- Teacher's bag, glasses, and ID card
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Memory -- Teacher's bag, glasses, and ID card

    Mrs. Koharu Hirakawa wa a teacher at Hjiyama Elementary School. She was exposed to the bombing while riding on a truck carrying the belongings of her pupils to the evacuation site in the countryside. her body was never found, but her belongings were handed over to her son about 4 months later. (Donated by Mihoko Naito and Akira Hirakawa.) 1,390 meters from the hypocenter, near Sumiyoshi Bridge.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 02 -- "Help my Daddy and Mommy!"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 02 -- "Help my Daddy and Mommy!" by Onoyama, Hiroko

    Help my Daddy and Mommy! -- Explanation by the artist: "A boy not yet of school age was standing on a crumbled pile of roof tiles shouting, 'My Daddy and Mommy are under here! Somebody help them!' A little baby on his back was crying. but no one could help that young boy." The scene depicted was 1200 meters from the hypocenter, near the Takanobashi Streetcar Stop. Hiroko Onoyama, the artist, was 23 at the time of the bombing, 80 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 01 –-  “Injured, like creatures from another worldâ€
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 01 –- “Injured, like creatures from another world†by Yoshimura, Kichisuke

    Explanation by the artist: “Covered with blood, trudging silently away like ghosts from the city, the injured looked like creatures from another world.†The scene depicted was 4,000 meters from the hypocenter, near the current Yaga 5-chome, at about 10:00 am, August 6, 1945. The artist, Kichisuke Yoshimura, was 18 years old at the time of the bombing, 75 when he did this drawing. -- The drawings presented in this group of images, “Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors,†were photographed in November, 2005, in the gallery area of the Museum in Hiroshima. They were part of an exhibition that rotates annually, presenting drawings created by survivors of the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima. -- A sign at the entrance to the exhibition space introduces us to the drawings on display. Quoting the sign, “ This exhibit displays drawings by A-bomb survivors. A drawing by a survivor in 1974 inspired Hiroshima Station of NHK (Japan’s public TV and radio network) to invite

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 08  --  "Water! Water, please!"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 08 -- "Water! Water, please!" by Sato, Yasuko

    Water! Water, please! -- Explanation by the Artist: -- "'Water! Water! Water!' Voices reverberated through the brick building. I was told, 'get their names and addresses,' so I went around asking them. Some moved their mouths but I couldn't hear what they said. Some were already dead. One answered clearly. 'I'm Hitoshi Miyake. first year, Class 1, First Hiroshima Prefectural Junior High School.' A little later I went back to see him and Hitoshi was dead, too. Thinking about how he must have felt, I felt compelled to report his death to his family. On my way home, I found his house and told them. His parents just cried and cried." -- The scene depicted was 2,670 meters from the hypocenter, Hiroshima Army clothing Depot, Deshio-cho (now, Deshio-cho 2-chome). The artist was 17 at the time of the bombing, 74 when she drew this picture.