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  • Thumbnail for Furisode
    Furisode

    The furisode (swinging sleeves) is a type of kosode distinguished by sleeves that hang free of the main body of the garment, below the arm. Although in the early part of the Edo period the sleeves of the furisode were not especially long, they gradually increased in length so that by the latter half of the period, sleeves as long as ninety cm were made. The furisode was worn on special occasions by children and young women. This refined example could have been worn by a woman of the samurai class. - Kawakami Shigeki

  • Thumbnail for Kimono Price Tag
    Kimono Price Tag

    A price tag with a punch: this kimono costs about $500.

  • Thumbnail for Pink embroidered garment - detail
    Pink embroidered garment - detail

    Detail shows the fine needlework and variation of color utilized to create a sense of depth in the flowers on this garment.

  • Thumbnail for Man's beaded jacket-back view
    Man's beaded jacket-back view by Chief Tonkaling

    Man's beaded jacket made of abaca fiber. From Mindanao.

  • Thumbnail for Battle flag
    Battle flag

    Battle flag in the shape of a right triangle. Made of red cotton with a black cotton Chinese character in the center, which probably represents the name of the battalion.

  • Thumbnail for Cotton robe-front view
    Cotton robe-front view

    Robe made of Japanese cotton and old Japanese kimonos with complex embroidered decorations on the front and back. From Hokkaido.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Lady's Changfu (third level informal court attire) robe with designs of flowers, bats, waves, butterflies, and clouds (edging detail)
    Chinese Lady's Changfu (third level informal court attire) robe with designs of flowers, bats, waves, butterflies, and clouds (edging detail)

    Roundels contain auspicious imagery--peonies and bats; bats are also featured in the wave pattern hem; and bats, flowers, and butterflies float freely outside the roundels on the front and back of the garment. Plain weave pale green satin ground with sections of dark blue ground on the sleeve; red, blue, yellow and orange satin stitch and seed (Peking) stitch silk thread embroidery. Length: 126 cm; sleeve length: 74 cm length. The ground color was probably originally darker, closer to turquoise. This garment is typical of its type in that it mimics the shape of men's garments. It was made for wives of officials who were required to wear the same type garments as their husbands. Both have eight roundels with embroidered designs, three in front, three in back, and one on each shoulder. The sleeves are cut wide and have bands filled with embroidered patterns between the large cuffs and the shoulders. Women's robes are distinguished from those worn by men by their high side slits and by their decorative motifs, as here, dominated by flowers, bats, and butterflies.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese woman's coat - back
    Chinese woman's coat - back

    Yellow ground figured satin with design of butterflies, flowers, and auspicious objects, and satin stitch silk thread and couched gold thread embroidery with designs of flowers and butterflies. Sleeves have embroidery on green ground silk; center panel and border panel of blue ground silk. Length: 91 cm

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 123, Goiter- Gansu.
    Thorp Collection 123, Goiter- Gansu.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 163, Weaving Nets Yichang.
    Thorp Collection 163, Weaving Nets Yichang.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Ashikaga Yoshimasa
    Ashikaga Yoshimasa

    This portrait done with ink and color and gold leaf on silk is believed to be of the eighth Ashikaga shogun, Yoshimasa.

  • Thumbnail for Kosode
    Kosode

    The kosode was the principal Japanese outer robe from the sixteenth century on, having previously served as outer garment for the lower classes and as undergarment for the upper classes. From the kosode evolved the modern kimono. Kosode literally means small sleeves," a reference not to the length or width of the sleeves themselves but to the size of the wrist openings. This kosode is a representative example of the Kanbun style of kosode decoration that was particularly popular during the Kanbun era (1661-1673) of the Edo period. On the back of this kosode, large overlapping maple leaves form the arc across teh shoulders to the right hem, with the red figured satin (rinzu) background exposed on the left." - Kawakami Shigeki

  • Thumbnail for Samurai Armor
    Samurai Armor

    Originally owned and worn by Honda Tadakatsu (1548-1610), one of Tokugawa Ieyasu's generals and a powerful daimyo of Ise Province (a large part of present-day Mie Prefecture). The antlers are large but lightweight,being made of wood and layers of paper hardened with coats of black lacquer. The armor itself was made of leather, lacquer and iron.

  • Thumbnail for Noh Costume
    Noh Costume

    Embroidery with glued-on gold or silver leaf. In Noh, costumes decorated in this technique are known themselves as nuihaku.

  • Thumbnail for Karaori or Noh Robe
    Karaori or Noh Robe

    A silk outer robe for female roles in the Noh performance.,

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ichimatsu Doll in Blue Kimono - side detail
    Japanese Ichimatsu Doll in Blue Kimono - side detail

    Ichimatsu doll, 22†with human hair, glass eyes, and working wooden fan and joined limbs. Named after Sanogawa Ichimatsu, an 18th c. Kabuki actor who specialized in female roles, Ichimatsu dolls are an Edo (Tokyo) invention. They portray little Japanese girls and boys in their holiday silk kimonos and are sometimes commissioned by the rich as portraits of their children. The dolls are display objects, not toys, and are usually kept in a glass box. They can range in size from 5†to 30†and are especially valuable if triple jointed. A subcategory of Ichimatsu Dolls that is of particular interest to Berea College is the torei-ningyo or Friendship Doll. These are Ichimatsu dolls have their origins in the attempt by the Reverend Sidney L. Gulick to amend bad feelings in Japan created by the Exclusion Act of 1924, which denied immigration and citizenship rights to persons of Chinese and Japanese descent. Gulick, who knew Francis Hutchins, hit on the idea of sending “blue-eyed dolls†as ambassadors of friendship. He managed to have 12,379 sent to Japan by 1927. The dolls were very favorably received and in return, 58 large Ichimatsu dolls were commissioned from such noted doll-makers as Hirata Goyo to represent the Imperial Household, the 6 largest cities, the individual prefectures, and the Japanese territories of Korea, Taiwan, and Manchuria. Each Friendship Doll was furnished with accessories, including lacquered furniture, tea sets, lanterns, folding screens, parasols, geta (raised wood sandals), and other personal ornaments, not to mention passports. The friendship dolls sailed to America in 1927. They toured the country and were then given to museums, libraries and other appropriate institutions that had children’s departments, with Miss Japan going to the Smithsonian Institution. (See Sidney L. Gulick, Dolls of Friendship: The Story of a Goodwill Project between the Children of America and Japan, Friendship Press, NY: 1927.) Many Friendship Dolls are now lost or forgotten, though efforts are being made to find the original group and some have even returned to Japan for restoration, arriving there to great local fanfare. In addition, Gulick’s grandson, Sidney L. Gulick III, continues to send dolls to Japan.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Lady's Changfu (third level informal court attire) robe with designs of flowers, bats, waves, butterflies, and clouds (round detail)
    Chinese Lady's Changfu (third level informal court attire) robe with designs of flowers, bats, waves, butterflies, and clouds (round detail)

    Roundels contain auspicious imagery--peonies and bats; bats are also featured in the wave pattern hem; and bats, flowers, and butterflies float freely outside the roundels on the front and back of the garment. Plain weave pale green satin ground with sections of dark blue ground on the sleeve; red, blue, yellow and orange satin stitch and seed (Peking) stitch silk thread embroidery. Length: 126 cm; sleeve length: 74 cm length. The ground color was probably originally darker, closer to turquoise. This garment is typical of its type in that it mimics the shape of men's garments. It was made for wives of officials who were required to wear the same type garments as their husbands. Both have eight roundels with embroidered designs, three in front, three in back, and one on each shoulder. The sleeves are cut wide and have bands filled with embroidered patterns between the large cuffs and the shoulders. Women's robes are distinguished from those worn by men by their high side slits and by their decorative motifs, as here, dominated by flowers, bats, and butterflies.

  • Thumbnail for Wheel-thrown dark brown teabowl with brocade mat
    Wheel-thrown dark brown teabowl with brocade mat

    This teabowl, with its brocade mat and dark brown glaze, is said to have been one that was presented to soldiers upon their safe return in WWII. The teabowl has a right angle carved into the bottom of the foot; along the base of the bowl are Japanese characters; the mat is stripped aqua, mustard, forest green, orange, lavender and gray under a golden floral design with an animal all over.

  • Thumbnail for Jinbaori
    Jinbaori

    This jinbaori, made of wool, is said to have been owned by Date Masamune, daimyo of Sendai. The jinbaori's purpose was originally functional, being worn over armor for protection against cold and rain. Horizontally centered on the back of this jacket of thin wool is the bamboo and sparrow crest ("mon") of the Date family embroidered in gold.

  • Thumbnail for Kimono Display
    Kimono Display

    Beautiful white silk fabric to be used for kimonos.

  • Thumbnail for Oyoroi  Samurai Armor
    Oyoroi Samurai Armor

    Oyoroi (literally "great armor") was the loose-fitting defensive armor of mounted archers that was developed late in the Heian period. It is made chiefly of leather and iron bound together to form horizontal tiers.

  • Thumbnail for Kimono Close-up
    Kimono Close-up

    A stately looking male kimono.

  • Thumbnail for Kimono Display
    Kimono Display

    Some kimono fabric on display.

  • Thumbnail for Kariginu or Noh "Hunting Robe"
    Kariginu or Noh "Hunting Robe"

    The kariginu, literally hunting robe," was originally an informal jacket worn by men of the court class in the Heian period. In the medieval era it was adapted by elite samurai as their most formal garment. It is thought that the kariginu first used in Noh performances were those actually worn by samurai aristocrats. In the Edo period the kariginu was established as a Noh costume, and these kariginu for the stage were made larger than the kariginu for daily wear from which they had originated. in Noh, the kariginu is regarded as the most imortant outer garment for male roles." - Kawakami Shigeki.

  • Thumbnail for Woman's apron
    Woman's apron

    Another example of a garment worn like a Western style apron by Chinese women, but not utilized in the kitchen. This piece shows a number of symbols including the butterfly which represents old age along with the stylized long-life symbol.