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  • Thumbnail for Oyoroi  Samurai Armor
    Oyoroi Samurai Armor

    Oyoroi (literally "great armor") was the loose-fitting defensive armor of mounted archers that was developed late in the Heian period. It is made chiefly of leather and iron bound together to form horizontal tiers.

  • Thumbnail for Dobuku or Short Jacket
    Dobuku or Short Jacket

    The dobuku was a short jacket worn by high-ranking samurai from the late Muromachi to early Edo periods. This example is made of leather and has seven white leather paulownia crests appliqued to the front and back.

  • Thumbnail for Samurai Armor
    Samurai Armor

    Originally owned and worn by Honda Tadakatsu (1548-1610), one of Tokugawa Ieyasu's generals and a powerful daimyo of Ise Province (a large part of present-day Mie Prefecture). The antlers are large but lightweight,being made of wood and layers of paper hardened with coats of black lacquer. The armor itself was made of leather, lacquer and iron.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Lady's Changfu (third level informal court attire) robe with designs of flowers, bats, waves, butterflies, and clouds (sleeve detail)
    Chinese Lady's Changfu (third level informal court attire) robe with designs of flowers, bats, waves, butterflies, and clouds (sleeve detail)

    Roundels contain auspicious imagery--peonies and bats; bats are also featured in the wave pattern hem; and bats, flowers, and butterflies float freely outside the roundels on the front and back of the garment. Plain weave pale green satin ground with sections of dark blue ground on the sleeve; red, blue, yellow and orange satin stitch and seed (Peking) stitch silk thread embroidery. Length: 126 cm; sleeve length: 74 cm length. The ground color was probably originally darker, closer to turquoise. This garment is typical of its type in that it mimics the shape of men's garments. It was made for wives of officials who were required to wear the same type garments as their husbands. Both have eight roundels with embroidered designs, three in front, three in back, and one on each shoulder. The sleeves are cut wide and have bands filled with embroidered patterns between the large cuffs and the shoulders. Women's robes are distinguished from those worn by men by their high side slits and by their decorative motifs, as here, dominated by flowers, bats, and butterflies.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Lady's Changfu (third level informal court attire) robe with designs of flowers, bats, waves, butterflies, and clouds (front)
    Chinese Lady's Changfu (third level informal court attire) robe with designs of flowers, bats, waves, butterflies, and clouds (front)

    Roundels contain auspicious imagery--peonies and bats; bats are also featured in the wave pattern hem; and bats, flowers, and butterflies float freely outside the roundels on the front and back of the garment. Plain weave pale green satin ground with sections of dark blue ground on the sleeve; red, blue, yellow and orange satin stitch and seed (Peking) stitch silk thread embroidery. Length: 126 cm; sleeve length: 74 cm length. The ground color was probably originally darker, closer to turquoise. This garment is typical of its type in that it mimics the shape of men's garments. It was made for wives of officials who were required to wear the same type garments as their husbands. Both have eight roundels with embroidered designs, three in front, three in back, and one on each shoulder. The sleeves are cut wide and have bands filled with embroidered patterns between the large cuffs and the shoulders. Women's robes are distinguished from those worn by men by their high side slits and by their decorative motifs, as here, dominated by flowers, bats, and butterflies.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Lady's Changfu (third level informal court attire) robe with designs of flowers, bats, waves, butterflies, and clouds (round detail)
    Chinese Lady's Changfu (third level informal court attire) robe with designs of flowers, bats, waves, butterflies, and clouds (round detail)

    Roundels contain auspicious imagery--peonies and bats; bats are also featured in the wave pattern hem; and bats, flowers, and butterflies float freely outside the roundels on the front and back of the garment. Plain weave pale green satin ground with sections of dark blue ground on the sleeve; red, blue, yellow and orange satin stitch and seed (Peking) stitch silk thread embroidery. Length: 126 cm; sleeve length: 74 cm length. The ground color was probably originally darker, closer to turquoise. This garment is typical of its type in that it mimics the shape of men's garments. It was made for wives of officials who were required to wear the same type garments as their husbands. Both have eight roundels with embroidered designs, three in front, three in back, and one on each shoulder. The sleeves are cut wide and have bands filled with embroidered patterns between the large cuffs and the shoulders. Women's robes are distinguished from those worn by men by their high side slits and by their decorative motifs, as here, dominated by flowers, bats, and butterflies.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese woman's skirt - detail
    Chinese woman's skirt - detail

    Green ground satin with multi-colored satin stitch silk thread embroidery of floral designs. Length: 82 cm. Although the coat is not an elaborate example, the embroidery is finely executed and the piece is in decent condition. Its very nice to have this garment intact, to be able to see the embroidery panels on the sleeves, which are often removed and used in the West as decorative wall panels. As for the skirt, the embroidery is finely executed but obviously not as meticulous as earlier Qing examples. Still, as securely datable garments, these are good indicators of the quality of traditional clothing of their day. That they were made for a foreigner is also interesting, as they reflect the vogue of fashion conscious ladies of that time for Asian art (which was being avidly collected in the West).

  • Thumbnail for Presentation Gift Cover (Fukusa)
    Presentation Gift Cover (Fukusa)

    Embroidered satin; 29 inches x 34 inches. Fukusa were decorative rectangular or square panels of lined fabric of various sizes that were used to place atop a gift during presentation. They were not used to wrap an object, but merely as an elaborate accoutrement used in the presentation ceremony. This example depicts five well dressed couples between rows of crops.

  • Thumbnail for Javanese ceremonial robe
    Javanese ceremonial robe

    Of particular didactic interest because of the synthesis of Indian, Chinese, Hindu and Buddhist elements worn in an Islamic Javanese court.

  • Thumbnail for Jinbaori
    Jinbaori

    This jinbaori, made of wool, is said to have been owned by Date Masamune, daimyo of Sendai. The jinbaori's purpose was originally functional, being worn over armor for protection against cold and rain. Horizontally centered on the back of this jacket of thin wool is the bamboo and sparrow crest ("mon") of the Date family embroidered in gold.

  • Thumbnail for Ashikaga Yoshimasa
    Ashikaga Yoshimasa

    This portrait done with ink and color and gold leaf on silk is believed to be of the eighth Ashikaga shogun, Yoshimasa.

  • Thumbnail for Kimono Shop:  Obi price
    Kimono Shop: Obi price

    This obi costs about $180.

  • Thumbnail for Kimono Price Tag
    Kimono Price Tag

    A price tag with a punch: this kimono costs about $500.

  • Thumbnail for Kimono Close-up
    Kimono Close-up

    A stately looking male kimono.

  • Thumbnail for Traditional  loom
    Traditional loom

    This is a traditional loom located within the Korean folk village. Seoul, South Korea.

  • Thumbnail for Embroidered baby hat
    Embroidered baby hat

    Hat put on infant or young child in order to protect it from evil spirits.

  • Thumbnail for Small Purse
    Small Purse

    Embroidered purse of about 3 inches square sowing images of butterflies and peonies. Given the subject matter of the images, it was probably used by a woman.

  • Thumbnail for Imperial throne cover
    Imperial throne cover

    Prince's imperial yellow silk throne cover with a central embroidered (three and four toed) dragon. The dragon is flanked by dragons on each corner, auspicious clouds, and magic pearls on the sides.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese woman's coat - detail
    Chinese woman's coat - detail

    Yellow ground figured satin with design of butterflies, flowers, and auspicious objects, and satin stitch silk thread and couched gold thread embroidery with designs of flowers and butterflies. Sleeves have embroidery on green ground silk; center panel and border panel of blue ground silk. Length: 91 cm

  • Thumbnail for Chinese woman's coat - back
    Chinese woman's coat - back

    Yellow ground figured satin with design of butterflies, flowers, and auspicious objects, and satin stitch silk thread and couched gold thread embroidery with designs of flowers and butterflies. Sleeves have embroidery on green ground silk; center panel and border panel of blue ground silk. Length: 91 cm

  • Thumbnail for Presentation Gift Cover (Fukusa)
    Presentation Gift Cover (Fukusa)

    Embroidered silk. Fukusa were decorative rectangular or square panels of lined fabric of various sizes that were used to place atop a gift during presentation. This example depicts a golden Dutch warship under sail with the wind on a calm sea. The ship is rendered in heavy gold couched thread and fine satin stitches. "Namban" art, depicting 'southern barbarians' (as the Dutch and the Portuguese were first thought to be by the insular Japanese), was very popular subject matter in Edo period decorative arts.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 163, Weaving Nets Yichang.
    Thorp Collection 163, Weaving Nets Yichang.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Kimono Display
    Kimono Display

    Beautiful white silk fabric to be used for kimonos.

  • Thumbnail for Furisode
    Furisode

    The furisode (swinging sleeves) is a type of kosode distinguished by sleeves that hang free of the main body of the garment, below the arm. Although in the early part of the Edo period the sleeves of the furisode were not especially long, they gradually increased in length so that by the latter half of the period, sleeves as long as ninety cm were made. The furisode was worn on special occasions by children and young women. This refined example could have been worn by a woman of the samurai class. - Kawakami Shigeki

  • Thumbnail for Kimono Display
    Kimono Display

    A kimono display at a local department store.