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45 hits

  • Thumbnail for Qawwali at the Dargah, evening performance
    Qawwali at the Dargah, evening performance

    The senior singer, Taj Muhammad, prepares for an evening qawwali in the inner courtyard of the dargah. Men of the town join him to sing or to listen to the captivating melodies. In Khuldabad, qawwali performance is an almost exclusively male affair. Men sing and play the instruments, while others listen and offer money to the musicians. Small boys hang around the dargah during qawwalis, as well as at other times, to run errands or sit quietly and listen. Here, several foreign females also sit in the audience.

  • Thumbnail for Bhajan singing 1
    Bhajan singing 1

    Singers from the Rama Temple in Ellora sing devotional songs (bhajans) to Rama, Krishna, and other Vaishnava deities. Accompanying the singers are musicians playing the harmonium, hand cymbals, and drum. As this gathering was on a cool January evening (2003), the singers are wrapped in woolen scarves and sweaters.

  • Thumbnail for Gagakus
    Gagakus

    Gagaku, the music and dance of the Japanese imperial court, is Japan's oldest performing art. A kangen ensemble (wind and strings) accompanies the dance. The main instruments are yokobue, sho.

  • Thumbnail for Hora-gai
    Hora-gai

    The narrow tip of a conch shell is cut off to make a wind instrument. Most have a mouthpiece. Used primarily in religious ceremonies.

  • Thumbnail for Da-Daiko
    Da-Daiko

    Large drum used in gagaku.

  • Thumbnail for Pair of Musicians from an Album of Eight Genre Scenes
    Pair of Musicians from an Album of Eight Genre Scenes by Shen Quan (1672-1762)

    Shen Quan's album of figures include a 1) female immortal goddess type on a donkey, 2) a scene of parting, with a male figure carrying a gourd, 3) a couple kneeling before an altar, 4) the three sages (Buddha, Confucius, Laozi), 5) a female immortal with female attendant and deer, 6) a pair of figures cutting bamboo, 7) the woman with a fan, and 8) a pair of musicians. The paintings are competent , but not outstanding. They represent a variety of popular figures, gods, practices and would have had popular appeal in the late imperial period. They demonstrate the strength and vitality of narrative imagery, even in the post-Dong Qichang age, when orthodox landscape painting was dominated with elite views of painting. Each album leaf is 6 3/16 x 10 3.8 inches. Ink and colors on silk. To see another image from the album, click on related record below.

  • Thumbnail for Children Playing Music (Album of 9 Sketches)
    Children Playing Music (Album of 9 Sketches) by Li Yunzhou

    The images are lively and engaging. Subjects are humorous, yet sensitively done. Style owes something to the Shanghai school of painting. 1) sage and boy gathering mushrooms, 2) itinerant blind musicians, 3) sage with bamboo fishing pole, 4) children playing music, 5) scholar leaning on a rock, 6) children lighting a firecracker, 7) Li Tiekuai, 8) scholars about to write at a low stone table, 9) female zither player. Ink on paper. The condition of the works is poor. To view another image from the album, click on related record below.

  • Thumbnail for Seated Musician/Singer
    Seated Musician/Singer

    Seated figure of singer with hands clapping; covered in yellow glaze except for knees which are covered in turquoise paint; old label on bottom from MIA and VA & T. 6 7/8 x 4 3/4 x 4 1/2".

  • Thumbnail for Qawwali performance at the Dargah
    Qawwali performance at the Dargah

    A senior singer plays harmonium and leads the qawwali by singing verses praising particular saints. Other singers, like the man sitting next to him in this photo, sing antiphonal or chorus-like responses to each of his verses.

  • Thumbnail for Qawwali singer, Taj Muhammad
    Qawwali singer, Taj Muhammad

    Taj Muammad, Khuldabad's senior qawwali singer in January 2003, left Khuldabad as a young teen to study and live with a respected qawwali teacher in Bombay. His Khuldabadi family had recognized his gift as he sang with the local qawwali performers as a boy, and so supported his move to Bombay to learn with a master, an ustad. In his sixties, Taj Muhammad was still singing the somber and spirited melodies in a clear voice, praising God, the Prophet, and early Sufi saints.

  • Thumbnail for Gekkin
    Gekkin

    A four-stringed instrument introduced from China in the 18th century. Plucked with picks (to the right). Used to accompany folksongs and other traditional music, and with instruments such as the koto.

  • Thumbnail for Mukkuri
    Mukkuri

    Traditional instrument of the Ainu people of Hokkaido. Sound is made by pulling on strings attached to a thin bamboo board. The mouth is used to add resonance.

  • Thumbnail for Five-stringed musical instrument
    Five-stringed musical instrument

    This five-string musical instrument decorated with mother-of-pearl and carved out of sandalwood is one of the items stored at the Shoso-in treasure house of Todai-ji. This is one example of the excellent, handcrafted articles brought to Japan.

  • Thumbnail for Kotsuzumi Drum and Storage Box
    Kotsuzumi Drum and Storage Box

    The kotsuzumi is a percussion instrument shaped much like an hourglass, with a thin middle and two flaring ends. Drumheads of leather mounted on iron rings are fitted on either end with the two drumheads connected by hemp cords. It is held with the left hand, placed on the right shoulder, and struck with the fingers of the right hand. This set is decorated with a spring design of rafts with cherry blossoms in gold maki-e on a black lacquered ground. This kotsuzumi is accompanied by a storage box decorated witha design in maki-e on black lacquer of running water and maple leaves. The design allude to many poems from the Heian period regarding the Tatsuta Riber, famous for the autumn foliage along its banks." - Kawakami Shigeki

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Temple Bell - bell only
    Japanese Temple Bell - bell only

    Shipped from Yokohama to the campus. The bell is inscribed with the following text in both English and Japanese: "Are we not all one family". Weight: 400 lbs; Diameter: 21.6 inches. A wooden ringer hangs on a post of the torii that supports and frames the bell. Library staff ring the bell at the end of each academic year. Location: basement of Beeghly Library. The library construction post-dates the bell and it appears the stairwell nook in which the bell resides, hovering over a very Japanese-looking bed of rocks, was designed specifically for this piece. Although this is not an old bell from a Japanese temple, it is an interesting, finely created example of the craft, showing the perpetuation of this craftmaking skill into the present age. It is a fitting symbol of friendship between the two cultures and typifies the Japanese propensity for spreading the doctrine of peace through traditional symbolic imagery in the post WW II era.

  • Thumbnail for Bo - Bell
    Bo - Bell by Anonymous

    Bronze Bell from Southern China, dating from the end of the Western Zhou or very early Eastern Zhou. Decorated with phoenixes, silkworms, and taotie masks."

  • Thumbnail for Qawwali, impromptu afternoon performance
    Qawwali, impromptu afternoon performance

    A senior qawwali singer is joined by other men to sing qawwals in praise of God, the Prophet, and Sufi saints. This was an impromptu qawwali performed with men who happened to be at the dargah.

  • Thumbnail for Tibetan Skull Drum
    Tibetan Skull Drum

    As described in the pamphlet, this is a "skull hand-drum, dating from Qing dynasty. Made from the skull caps of a boy and girl joined together at the tops and covered with lamb or monkey skin."

  • Thumbnail for Anthem--China - People's Republic of China 1949 - present
    Anthem--China - People's Republic of China 1949 - present

    Audio clip of the anthem for the People's Republic of China.

  • Thumbnail for Taiko
    Taiko

    Animal hide is nailed to the drum barrel. Drums are used in folk performances throughout Japan. Sizes vary - some can be held in the hands, some are taller than the drummers.

  • Thumbnail for Shakuhachi
    Shakuhachi

    An end-blown bamboo flute that has no reed. Used to accompany folk songs and other traditional music, and also for performances of modern music.

  • Thumbnail for Gagaku
    Gagaku

    The kangen ensmble plays the world's oldest orchestra music. See gagaku, soc000113.

  • Thumbnail for Sanshin
    Sanshin

    A string instrument almost always used in performance of Okinawan traditional music. Said to be the prototype of the shamisen.

  • Thumbnail for Nokan Flutes and Cases for Noh Drama
    Nokan Flutes and Cases for Noh Drama

    Bamboo flute with a mouth hole and seven finger holes. The nokan is the only wind instrument among the instruments used in Noh,and functions as a rhythm instrument.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Temple Bell - angle view
    Japanese Temple Bell - angle view

    Shipped from Yokohama to the campus. The bell is inscribed with the following text in both English and Japanese: "Are we not all one family". Weight: 400 lbs; Diameter: 21.6 inches. A wooden ringer hangs on a post of the torii that supports and frames the bell. Library staff ring the bell at the end of each academic year. Location: basement of Beeghly Library. The library construction post-dates the bell and it appears the stairwell nook in which the bell resides, hovering over a very Japanese-looking bed of rocks, was designed specifically for this piece. Although this is not an old bell from a Japanese temple, it is an interesting, finely created example of the craft, showing the perpetuation of this craftmaking skill into the present age. It is a fitting symbol of friendship between the two cultures and typifies the Japanese propensity for spreading the doctrine of peace through traditional symbolic imagery in the post WW II era.