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166 hits

  • Thumbnail for Tripod incense burner
    Tripod incense burner

    Tripod incense burner, decorated with a pattern imitating rush weave, and a variety of fantastic, mythical animals. The bird which is also the lid handle is a phoenix. The four minor figures of the same bird represent a spatial symbolism which symbolizes the whole universe. Dragons and serpents complete the decoration.

  • Thumbnail for Tripod vessel with hollow legs
    Tripod vessel with hollow legs

    Tripod bronze vessel with hollow legs and 'trilobate body'; called 'Li' or 'Li-eing.' On each lobe of the vessel is featured a 'leonine T'ao-t'ieh,' clamping the cylindrical leg of the vessel between its jaws.

  • Thumbnail for Writing Table and Writing Utensil Box
    Writing Table and Writing Utensil Box

    Bundai (writing table) and suzuribako (writing utensil box) decorated with a combination of bamboo, paulownia, and the phoenix. The background is done using a technique known as nashiji, similar in appearance to the skin of the nashi, or Japanese pear, in which metal flakes are suspended in lacquer.

  • Thumbnail for Papermaking
    Papermaking

    This is how paper was made in early times. Paper is still made this way in some parts of Korea with only minor changes. Seoul, South Korea.

  • Thumbnail for Baskets
    Baskets

    This is a man in the Korean traditional village that makes baskets. Seoul, South Korea.

  • Thumbnail for Dish with red bat motif - bottom view
    Dish with red bat motif - bottom view

    Bottom view shows hollow pedestal foot of the dish.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze oviform vase and hexagonal stand - bottom view
    Bronze oviform vase and hexagonal stand - bottom view

    This solidly cast, evenly patinated simple form recalls the subtlety of Song Dynasty ceramics, themselves, a revival of delicate archaic forms seen in ancient bronzes and pottery. This shape also is seen in varying forms in Ming and Qing Dynasty Imperial porcelains and the attached openwork fret-pattern hexagonal stand is a common early Qing embellishment found in both bronze vessels and porcelain.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze mirror stand
    Bronze mirror stand

    Cast in the form of a recumbent unicorn or qilin supporting a crescent shaped base for a mirror, this mythical beast carries its head turned to its left and has its legs folded beneath the equine body. In traditional Chinese mythology the predominant characteristic of the qilin is that of benevolence and kindness, offering an evocative addition to a court dressing table. 5.75 inches high x 7 5/16 wide x 4.25 deep.

  • Thumbnail for Gilt bronze pin
    Gilt bronze pin

    This intricate and beautifully detailed applique comprising three overlapping circular dragon discs could have been an adornment on a court or military dress or perhaps an attachment for a horse trapping. 1 inch high by 3 inches wide.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Kodzuka handle with crescent moon and sea waves design
    Japanese Kodzuka handle with crescent moon and sea waves design

    The Edo or Tokugawa era of Japan witnessed an unprecedented flourish of many art forms. The rise of the samurai culture and the political fermentation of this unsettling time brought out with them a modern return of the dolmen style of the art of the Japanese sword. The styles of decoration and the variety of materials used in swordsmiths form a quintessential element of the Japanese literature. Japan's wealth of artistic creation demonstrates its interest in small things and the detailed treatments of them, giving evidence of remarkable skill and taste. For centuries, Japanese swordsmiths devoted their excellence in the art of decoration the samurai's sword-furniture. As part of the warrior's most unseparated possession, the Kodzuka functions as a handle or grip or hilt of the small ko-gatana knives. This iron Japanese Kodzuka is one of the finest representatives of the Edo Japanese decorative sword accessories. The etching style and the abstract delicacy are doubtlessly from the last great master swordsmith Kano Natsuo (1828-1898) or his pupils. The influence of Zen Buddhism of the time eloquently manifests in Natuo's unique choice of motifs and unsurpassed style (from the Otsuki School). His etching style has a distinctive sense of elegance, austere, reserved, and never overflowing. There is an intentional consistency of manipulating a commanding void that dominates the whole composition. The decorative elements employed are conceptual and minimal motifs derived from nature. This Kodzuka has the common plain oblong shape. Its outer face is sophisticatedly designed with a bold relief-etching (takabori or high carving) or raised decoration of a gold crescent moon in the background, partly eclipsed by stylized tidal waves. Some scattered gold dots on top of the waves hint the splashed foam. The Japanese have such great reverence of the force of nature such as big waves (tsunami). On the back of the piece, there are three Japanese characters meaning 'the nature of wild waves' (read from the bottum up). The waves occupy only the bottom right space of the Kodzuka, leaving a powerful void. The abstract and simplicity of this remarkable composition magnificently counteracts and redeems the sense of austerity of the handle. Its balanced yet asymmetrical layout signifies the philosophy of the samurai class: the dynamic between 'configuration/principle' and the 'material energy/vital force'. Objects like this are widely collected as works of art.

  • Thumbnail for Wooden fan (side 2)
    Wooden fan (side 2)

    This fan has good detail and color quality, and is most likely inspired by a literary theme.The fan emerged in Japan by the 9th century AD. The Japanese have a long tradition of making wooden fans threaded together on the top of each rib. However, the size of this fan is large, and the format (circular when opened to its full extension) may be inspired by a type known as “big wheel fan,†attributed to Korea, during the Yi (Chosen) dynasty (1392-1910 AD). However, the brushwork, subject matter, and motifs of the paintings on the fans are Japanese. The size and weight of the fan might not have a practical function. The common motifs on Japanese wooden fans include stories from literature, such as the Tale of Genji.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese feather fan with birds and flowers (side 1 )
    Chinese feather fan with birds and flowers (side 1 )

    This fan displays a pair of peacocks and peonies and other flowers, which are common subjects in these types of fan. Although its condition is poor,it is a very interesting artifacts. The Chinese export of feather fans first appeared in Europe during the first quarter of the 19th century. They are usually made of goose feathers (occasionally with added peacock feathers on the top) mounted on sticks which can be made of a variety of materials, including ivory and bone. The frames of the fans are carved, showing the quality of their craftsmanship, with flowers and classical scripts, which could be either an imitation of Oracle bone characters or seal/clerical scripts. Originally these fans would have been very costly.

  • Thumbnail for Ink -wash wooden wheel fan (side 2)
    Ink -wash wooden wheel fan (side 2)

    This fan features a genre scene in ink-wash style brushwork, The fan emerged in Japan by the 9th century AD. The Japanese have a long tradition of making wooden fans threaded together on the top of each rib. However, the size of this fan is large, and the format (circular when opened to its full extension) may be inspired by a type known as “big wheel fan,†attributed to Korea, during the Yi (Chosen) dynasty (1392-1910 AD). However, the brushwork, subject matter, and motifs of the paintings on the fans are Japanese. The size and weight of the fan might not have a practical function. The common motifs on Japanese wooden fans include stories from literature, such as the Tale of Genji.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Inscribed Bronze Mirror (front)
    Chinese Inscribed Bronze Mirror (front)

    4 3/4" w. Astronomical mirror.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Inscribed Bronze Mirror (front)
    Chinese Inscribed Bronze Mirror (front)

    6 1/4" w. The central pierced knob surrounded by four radiating petals enclosed by a square band filled with dashes vertical and horizontal and loops at the corners, encircled by eight slightly raised bosses and dragons with birds, with outer concentric rings of archaic characters and dog-tooth bands. The recessed portion cast in linear relief integrated with the Ts, Ls, and Vs.

  • Thumbnail for Incense Burner on Stand
    Incense Burner on Stand

    Small brass incense burner, probably originally used for funerary rites within the home. Small turned dog on the top, with dragon heads projecting from the handles.

  • Thumbnail for Blue Glass Vase with Box (vase profile)
    Blue Glass Vase with Box (vase profile)

    Another view of small blown glass bottle, mottled with various colors ranging from light blue to brown intermixed with bits of mica to create a sparkling effect.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Inscribed Bronze Mirror (back)
    Chinese Inscribed Bronze Mirror (back)

    4 3/4" w. Astronomical mirror.

  • Thumbnail for Blue Glass Vase with Box
    Blue Glass Vase with Box

    Small blown glass bottle, mottled with various colors ranging from light blue to brown intermixed with bits of mica to create a sparkling effect. Presented to Robert Thorp in a small box with stand.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Jizhou Tomb Vases (pair)
    Chinese Jizhou Tomb Vases (pair)

    Pair - 5 1/2" h. Baluster - 6 1/8" h. A pair of pyriform vases on a high splayed foot, molded with a raised floral scroll above a raised band which is over a band overlapping lotus leaves, an incised thin band on the wide neck terminating in a flat ringed mouth. The dirty light brown and crazed glaze on the exterior falls to halfway down the foot where the grey sugary body is brown from firing. A third vase is of baluster form with moled leaves on the shoulder below the bulbous portion and on the foot, two applied tubular handles above an incised ring on the neck. The dirty light brown glaze is halfway down the foot.

  • Thumbnail for Carved Nuts with Literary Scenes - top view
    Carved Nuts with Literary Scenes - top view

    1 1/2""h x 1 3/4""l (including base). Finely carved sampan with moveable windows and doors set on a peach stone stand carved with raised flowers on an inverted chevron ground.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Bronze Inscribed Mirror (front)
    Chinese Bronze Inscribed Mirror (front)

    4 5/16" w. Twenty four characters forming a frieze flanked by rope twist borders in the recessed field surrounding the plain pierced central knob.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Carved Jade Seal of Turtle  - view 1)
    Chinese Carved Jade Seal of Turtle - view 1)

    2 1/4" x 2 1/4". Mottled green jade with white and black inclusions, carved in cylindrical form with a turtle surmounted.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Carved Gourd with Literary Scenes (2 view 2)
    Chinese Carved Gourd with Literary Scenes (2 view 2)

    1 1/2"h x 1 3/4"l (including base). Side view of finely carved gourd showing scenes from literature and opera.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Mutton Fat Jade with Wooden Stand - bottom view
    Chinese Mutton Fat Jade with Wooden Stand - bottom view

    3 7/8" l. Greenish-white jade with russet markings carved in an archaistic style standing dragon, handcarved fitted wood stand.