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  • Thumbnail for Reconstructed casting assembly for a bell
    Reconstructed casting assembly for a bell

    As shown in this diagram, a 'bo' bell required outer modls for the suspension loop at bottom, and for its top, a pair for the sides, and a core to occupy the interior, all locked together with keys fitted to mortises.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze wine vessel, tsun type
    Bronze wine vessel, tsun type

    Wine vessel related to the ku type, only squatter and able to hold a greater volume of liquid. The decoration features small dragons and a large incised 't'ao-t'ieh.' [as quoted from Mario Bussagli]

  • Thumbnail for Shell Matching Game
    Shell Matching Game

    The octagonal, black-lacquered containers for this shell matching game are decorated with the family crest of the Hosokawa clan. The containers hold 360 shells, each one half of a pair with matching designs of subject matter from The Tale of Genji, or with floral and bird decorations. To play the game, the shells are mixed up and players must find the two shell halves with the same picture.

  • Thumbnail for Set of Trays and Tablewares
    Set of Trays and Tablewares

    This set is said to have been used by Tokugawa Iemitsu, the third Tokugawa shogun. "The entire set is decorated with a pear-skin ground (nashiji), a gold and silver maki-e clove floral scroll, and the three-leaved hollyhock mon. The edges of the trays are rimmed with silver, and the interiors of the bowls are finished with red laquer." - Suzuki Norio in "Japan: The Shaping of Daimyo Culture"

  • Thumbnail for Hindu temple
    Hindu temple

    A Hindu Temple located just outside of Chinatown, Singapore.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze oviform vase and hexagonal stand
    Bronze oviform vase and hexagonal stand

    This solidly cast, evenly patinated simple form recalls the subtlety of Song Dynasty ceramics, themselves, a revival of delicate archaic forms seen in ancient bronzes and pottery. This shape also is seen in varying forms in Ming and Qing Dynasty Imperial porcelains and the attached openwork fret-pattern hexagonal stand is a common early Qing embellishment found in both bronze vessels and porcelain. 19.25 inches in height x 9.5 width.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze censor
    Bronze censor

    Cast in the form of the mythical three-legged toad, emblematic of the unattainable and great wealth, the upper portion of its body forms the cover and the three spread legs, the base. Its mouth is pierced to allow the incense to drift upwards. This beast has both Taoist and Buddhist implications, as do many of legendary beasts and creatures in traditional Chinese iconography. 8 inches long, 5 inches high.

  • Thumbnail for Wooden fan (side 2)
    Wooden fan (side 2)

    This fan has good detail and color quality, and is most likely inspired by a literary theme.The fan emerged in Japan by the 9th century AD. The Japanese have a long tradition of making wooden fans threaded together on the top of each rib. However, the size of this fan is large, and the format (circular when opened to its full extension) may be inspired by a type known as “big wheel fan,†attributed to Korea, during the Yi (Chosen) dynasty (1392-1910 AD). However, the brushwork, subject matter, and motifs of the paintings on the fans are Japanese. The size and weight of the fan might not have a practical function. The common motifs on Japanese wooden fans include stories from literature, such as the Tale of Genji.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze vessel
    Bronze vessel

    In ancient Japan (prior to the Meiji era, 1868-1912), metalwork was solely for swords and Buddhist statues. During the Meiji era, a decree abolishing sword-wearing and the restoration of Shintoism, the original religion of Japan, as the national religion caused the making of metalwork to shift to objects for export and home consumption; the functions of objects and subject of decoration tended to be secular. This vase, designed with a style of Chinese bronze vessel, bears 8 different scenes on the entire body. There are four large panels, with subjects ranging from figurative to seascapes, on the main body of the vessel, and four small horizontal scenes, landscapes and seascapes are the subjects (possibly a display of the four seasons), on the bottom. The designs are done in relief. The borders of the panels are also ornamented with plant patterns, chrysanthemums and gingko tree leaves in particular common Japanese floral motif. A great deal of artistic appeal and distinctive styles are the trademark of Meiji metalwork.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese feather fan with birds and flowers (side 1 )
    Chinese feather fan with birds and flowers (side 1 )

    This fan displays a pair of peacocks and peonies and other flowers, which are common subjects in these types of fan. Although its condition is poor,it is a very interesting artifacts. The Chinese export of feather fans first appeared in Europe during the first quarter of the 19th century. They are usually made of goose feathers (occasionally with added peacock feathers on the top) mounted on sticks which can be made of a variety of materials, including ivory and bone. The frames of the fans are carved, showing the quality of their craftsmanship, with flowers and classical scripts, which could be either an imitation of Oracle bone characters or seal/clerical scripts. Originally these fans would have been very costly.

  • Thumbnail for Wooden fan (side 1 bird detail)
    Wooden fan (side 1 bird detail)

    This fan has good detail and color quality, and is most likely inspired by a literary theme.The fan emerged in Japan by the 9th century AD. The Japanese have a long tradition of making wooden fans threaded together on the top of each rib. However, the size of this fan is large, and the format (circular when opened to its full extension) may be inspired by a type known as “big wheel fan,†attributed to Korea, during the Yi (Chosen) dynasty (1392-1910 AD). However, the brushwork, subject matter, and motifs of the paintings on the fans are Japanese. The size and weight of the fan might not have a practical function. The common motifs on Japanese wooden fans include stories from literature, such as the Tale of Genji.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Inscribed Bronze Mirror (back)
    Chinese Inscribed Bronze Mirror (back)

    4 3/8" w. Seal characters forming a frieze

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Inscribed Bronze Mirror (back)
    Chinese Inscribed Bronze Mirror (back)

    3" w. Cast and decorated in relief with two men flanking the pierced dumbell-form knob and with eight Buddhist precious objects dispersed above and below. Narrow wedge shaped ridge.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Tomb Candle Holders - view 1
    Chinese Tomb Candle Holders - view 1

    7" h. Paneled hu-formed stem with two degenerated animal head handles, molded in relief with floral sprays divided by bow-form raised and molded vertical lines raised on a high tapered base molded in relief with a frieze of stylized lotus petals, supported by five simple feet, surmounted by a hexagonal drip pan, on top there is an inverted scalloped tip collar surmounted by a tapered lip, minutely crazed greenish-beige glaze carelessly applied

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Mutton Fat Jade with Wooden Stand (front)
    Chinese Mutton Fat Jade with Wooden Stand (front)

    3 7/8" l. Greenish-white jade with russet markings carved in an archaistic style standing dragon, handcarved fitted wood stand.

  • Thumbnail for Carved Gourd with Literary Scenes (1 view 1)
    Carved Gourd with Literary Scenes (1 view 1)

    1 1/2"h x 1 3/4"l (including base). Side view of finely carved gourd showing scenes from literature and opera.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Famille Rose Vases
    Chinese Famille Rose Vases

    5 1/2" h. Tall, slender form with ovoid body, slender elongated neck flaring to an inverted lip with an overall incised design of flowers enameled in famille rose colors, red enamel seal mark of Qianlong and of the period.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Carved Jade Seal of Turtle  - view 2
    Chinese Carved Jade Seal of Turtle - view 2

    2 1/4"" x 2 1/4"". Mottled green jade with white and black inclusions, carved in cylindrical form with a turtle surmounted.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Carved Jade Seal of Turtle  - view 3
    Chinese Carved Jade Seal of Turtle - view 3

    2 1/4"" x 2 1/4"". Mottled green jade with white and black inclusions, carved in cylindrical form with a turtle surmounted.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Carved Gourd with Literary Scenes (1 view 3)
    Chinese Carved Gourd with Literary Scenes (1 view 3)

    1 1/2"h x 1 3/4"l (including base). Side view of finely carved gourd showing scenes from literature and opera.

  • Thumbnail for Black Japanese Helmet
    Black Japanese Helmet

    Helmet, black with gold 5-petal flower emblem, red underside. Japanese helmet of the type called jingasa, 12x 13 inches. Lacquered wood in excellent condition. During the Tokugawa period, a key means of social control were the great parades of warlords and their retainers going to and from the capital city of Edo, where they were required to spend every other year in attendance upon the Shogun. These “alternate attendance†(sankin kotai) processions, up to 4,000 strong in the case of the Maeda clan, had the effect of keeping the common people of Japan in awe of the warriors. “Alternate attendance†thus helped keep the peace, something that the Shogunate was so good at doing that there was no war for the 250 years of the Tokugawa reign. As the Pax Tokugawa continued on and on, however, the Shogun and his retainers became warriors who never went to war. The actual ability to fight thus became secondary to maintaining a fearsome image. As Herman Ooms puts it in his essay in Edo: Art in Japan, 1615-1868, form became norm, and image, more important than reality. It is just this process that transformed armor into Art. Armor in the late Tokugawa Period is all about image, a point quite clear in this helmet. The helmet purports to be covered with silk that parts to reveal rough steel plates held together with large, round rivets. In fact, the helmet is made entirely of a thin, light wood covered with a layer of lacquer and gilt.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze Chinese Mirror
    Bronze Chinese Mirror

    H: 3/4" W: 5-1/8". Mirror, bronze disc with light green and yellow patina. Obverse: polished. Reverse: decorative outer edge, inscribed inner edge, center boss raised with hole to attach mirror to support; square container of light wood with sliding lid.

  • Thumbnail for Gold Lacquer Inro with Ivory Netsuke - front view
    Gold Lacquer Inro with Ivory Netsuke - front view

    H: 6 cm W: 5 cm L: 1.8 cm D: of netsuke 4.2 cm. Gold lacquer inro with overlay design in mother of pearl and shakudo. Design: flying cranes. Ivory netsuke: turtle and toad; signed inside. Cover: Korin

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 127, Buddha - Tatang.
    Thorp Collection 127, Buddha - Tatang.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Tripod incense burner
    Tripod incense burner

    Tripod incense burner, decorated with a pattern imitating rush weave, and a variety of fantastic, mythical animals. The bird which is also the lid handle is a phoenix. The four minor figures of the same bird represent a spatial symbolism which symbolizes the whole universe. Dragons and serpents complete the decoration.