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  • Thumbnail for Tamba pottery, view 06., Ichino home and workshop
    Tamba pottery, view 06., Ichino home and workshop

    This is the home and workshop of the Ichino family, one of the foremost pottery families in Tamba-Tachikui.

  • Thumbnail for Tamba pottery, view 13., pots left on ground near kiln
    Tamba pottery, view 13., pots left on ground near kiln

    These pieces had been left outside, on the ground next to the kiln. Some have obvious rough spots on them and may be pieces that will be re-fired.

  • Thumbnail for Tamba pottery, view 11., the Ichino kiln
    Tamba pottery, view 11., the Ichino kiln

    This is the Ichino family kiln, located next to their workshop.

  • Thumbnail for East Asian Ceramics:  Then and Now.  04, Shino-ware Jar by Rosanjin
    East Asian Ceramics: Then and Now. 04, Shino-ware Jar by Rosanjin by Kitaoji Rosanjin

    This Shino-ware jar was created by Rosanjin, a great Japanese ceramic artist of the first half of the 20th century. Rosanjin, a restaurateur by profession, was an "amateur" potter, who bagan making pottery because he could not find ceramic pieces that he felt were what he wanted to use in his restaurant. He often looked back to earlier traditions to find forms, glazes, techniques, and ideas from which to draw in his own modern work. In this piece, obviously, he has referred to the tradition of shino-ware with underglaze iron brush decoration. He has applied them to his own contemporary form, although it is interesting to note the undulations of the rim of the piece and to then look at the rims of many Momoyama and Edo period shino-ware tea ceremony bowls. The brown brushed design on this side of the piece are said to be stylized representations of pine trees; on the other side of the piece are forms suggesting birds. The orangish areas on the surface are areas where the glaze was

  • Thumbnail for Japanese ceramics: Sake bottle by Fujiwara Yu, modern Bizen potter.
    Japanese ceramics: Sake bottle by Fujiwara Yu, modern Bizen potter. by Fujiwara Yu (1932-2001)

    Sake bottle by Fujiwara Yu (1932-2001), a modern potter in Okayama, Bizen. The piece is perhaps 6 inches tall, made of unglazed stoneware. In the lower right, we see a suggestion of uncovered clay, the dense dark iron red that characterizes much Bizen ware. The rest of piece is heavily covered with deposits of ash from the firing and the crustiness of the surface suggests that perhaps the piece was in a part of the kiln where it was completely buried in charcoal during the firing. On loan from an anonymous collector, R2002.51.1

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics: Jar, Buncheong ware.
    Korean ceramics: Jar, Buncheong ware. by unknown

    A modest sized Buncheong ware jar, perhaps 5 inches in height. Stoneware with a white slip that was applied thickly with a coarse brush that left a sense of the gesture of the brush stroke on the surface. The form of this piece calls to mind the similar forms of pieces made in Japan in the 16th century, on the island of Kyushu, by Korean potters, such as those who created Takatori-ware in present-day Fukuoka Prefecture. An example of such a piece may be seen in image soc000146, in the St. Olaf College collection, Asian Take Out. Gift of Mr. Arthur J. McTaggart, 1998.25

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics: Dish with handle, Ao-oribe ware, view 01.
    Japanese Ceramics: Dish with handle, Ao-oribe ware, view 01. by unknown

    Oribe ware square dish with a broad handle, from the Mino region of Gifu prefecture, in west cental Honshu, a major pottery region. Light stoneware, probably fired in a neutral atmosphere, iron oxide brushwork decoration under a light glaze, with two corners of the piece and the handle dipped in a copper green glaze, creating the characteristic Oribe glaze pattern. (The Avery Brundage Collection, B64P34)

  • Thumbnail for Korean Ceramics:  Stand with a jar.
    Korean Ceramics: Stand with a jar. by unknown

    Stoneware jar on a stand, from the ancient region of Gaya in Korea. The stand accommodates the jar, which is round bottomed and could not stand on its own. The piercing of the stand base is probably visual, rather than being designed to serve a particular purpose. The side of the jar shows natural glazing, in the form of wood ash from the kiln fire that settled on the shoulder of the piece and fused with silica in the clay to create a natural, "accidental" glaze. (Gift of Juliet Boone, 1991.150.a-.b )

  • Thumbnail for Pitcher
    Pitcher

    White pottery pitcher attributed to the Longshan culture in China.

  • Thumbnail for Sake Flask
    Sake Flask

    Tokkuri, or sake flasks, were produced in great quantity by the Bizen kilns in the Momoyama period. In this examle, clean lines define the plump, barrel-shaped body, thin neck, and crisply finished mouth. The neat, concise form, made from a relatively fine-grained clay, provides a sympathetic surface for the red diagonal streaks which resulted from shielding a vessel wrapped in rice straw from direct contact with the flames during firing. The straw burns away, leaving the hidasuki on a background of unscorched white clay.

  • Thumbnail for Covered Dish
    Covered Dish

    Mino ware, Green Oribe type. This covered dish is a product of the Mino multi-chambered or "climbing" kilns, which produced Oribe ceramics characterized by an iridescent green copper glaze and underglaze iron drawing.

  • Thumbnail for China Shop
    China Shop

    This picture was taken by Prof. Edward S. Morse of Harvard, who came to Japan in 1877 at the invitation of Tokyo Imperial University to teach zoology.

  • Thumbnail for Ceramic ware
    Ceramic ware

    These are Korean cups made in the Korean traditional village. All of the objects found within the village represent how Koreans used to live in the past. Seoul, South Korea.

  • Thumbnail for Cloissone bowl
    Cloissone bowl

    Large cloissone bowl with lotus motif. Possibly used in Buddhist ceremonies as an offering dish.

  • Thumbnail for Cloissone bowl - interior view
    Cloissone bowl - interior view

    Interior of bowl shows attention to detail and close observation of an actual lotus. The cloissone artist may have been working from a painting of a lotus given the multiple perspectives represented here.

  • Thumbnail for Porcelain saucer dish - detail of side
    Porcelain saucer dish - detail of side

    This doucai enameled shallow dish is decorated on the interior with a central lappet roundel within double circle borders; the exterior depicts three cranes, emblematic of longevity amongst cloud scrolls and fungus. The base is inscribed with a Yongzheng (1723-1735) reign mark and is of the period, however the quality of the enameling and porcelain suggest that it was not intended for the Imperial household.

  • Thumbnail for Deep porcelaneous bowl
    Deep porcelaneous bowl

    This celadon bowl with a carved landscape decoration and cloud scroll border is a southern type called longquan ware, with its typically grayish body and burnt reddish-brown where exposed in the firing. The thick, pale olive green glaze darkens in the recessed carved design to highlight the subject of the decoration. 5 inches high by 8.5 inches wide.

  • Thumbnail for Large porcelain dish - detail of bottom
    Large porcelain dish - detail of bottom

    The decoration on this blue and white charger was inspired by Islamic ceramics of the 16th and 17th centuries and influenced the decorative patterns used on 18th century Dutch Delft wares.

  • Thumbnail for Shallow porcelain saucer dish
    Shallow porcelain saucer dish

    This doucai enameled dish is decorated with maidens in a terrace garden scene within a border of pine, prunus and bamboo, the “three friends of winterâ€. These plants are emblematic of longevity, as each hearty growth survives the cold, harsh winter months. The dish is inscribed on the base with an apocryphal Ming Dynasty Zhenghua (1465-1487) reign mark, but the decoration, enamel technique and subject matter are clearly 18th century. Width 8 inches; height 1 5/8 inches.

  • Thumbnail for Plate with Chinese motif of woman in a garden
    Plate with Chinese motif of woman in a garden

    9 3/4" X 9 3/4" X 1 1/2" Most likely made in Japan in the Arita manner. Depicts woman looking over a veranda railing at garden stone, flower, and butterfly.

  • Thumbnail for Musicians on Horseback (1 of 2) - profile view
    Musicians on Horseback (1 of 2) - profile view

    13 1/2 X 2 3/4 X 6 inches. Glazed pottery tomb figure of musician on horseback.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Stoneware Cup and Stand (separated tops)
    Chinese Stoneware Cup and Stand (separated tops)

    Cup - 2 1/8" h x 4" w. Stand - 1 1/4""h x 5 3/4" w. Petal - carved, campanulate cup, green-glazed, crazed and pooling thickly in recesses and running down on a solid, slightly splayed base in thicl pools, flat base with traces of spurs, double groove below the rim on the exterior. Design of overlapping petals repeated on the inside of the stand, encircling the cup ring, concave base, buff colored body.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Xingyao Porcelain Bowl (top)
    Chinese Xingyao Porcelain Bowl (top)

    3 3/8" h x 6 1/4" at widest point. Unusual form of "Samarra" type. Ovate and faceted octagonally with beaded strips strung vertically between the panels, a grooved ring on the flat base forming a wide foot ring, horizontal fluted interior with impressed floral spray at the bottom, one slightly raised semi-circle at the exterior only with 'tear' stains running toward the base.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Stoneware Cup and Stand (profile view)
    Chinese Stoneware Cup and Stand (profile view)

    Cup - 2 1/8" h x 4" w. Stand - 1 1/4" h x 5 3/4" w. Petal - carved, campanulate cup, green-glazed, crazed and pooling thickly in recesses and running down on a solid, slightly splayed base in thicl pools, flat base with traces of spurs, double groove below the rim on the exterior. Design of overlapping petals repeated on the inside of the stand, encircling the cup ring, concave base, buff colored body.

  • Thumbnail for Funerary Vases (detail 2)
    Funerary Vases (detail 2)

    Detail of neck of funerary vessel. This unusual green glaze jar belongs to a particular type of funerary vessel made during the Three Kingdoms and Western Jin dynasties. Called a hunping (spirit jar), it has a long tapered body topped by a configuration of architectural elements and animals. In this example, figures circle the jar as other creatures swarm up the neck of the container.