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  • Thumbnail for Tamba pottery, view 12., detail of the Ichino kiln
    Tamba pottery, view 12., detail of the Ichino kiln

    Closer view of the side of the Ichino kiln, showing the arched opening, the door, into one of the ware chambers. Piled next to the opening are the brick blocks that will be used to close off the opening for the next firing. Bundles of wood are stored on top of the arch and will be totally dried by the heat of the kiln during the early stages of the firing. Although there appear to be a couple of square kiln shelves to the left of the door in this photo, the Tamba kilns still are stacked largely using the traditional means of loading them, which means the use of saggers and/or the stacking of pots on top of one another, with wads of clay and high-silica ash wash between them, to prevent them from sticking to one another.

  • Thumbnail for East Asian Ceramics:  Then and Now.  03,  Shino-ware Ewer
    East Asian Ceramics: Then and Now. 03, Shino-ware Ewer by unknown

    Shino-ware was associated with kilns of the Mino district, near Tajimi in Gifu prefecture, central Honshu, north of Nagoya and Seto. Shino-ware is characterized by its glaze, which is known simply as Shino. It is usually a thick white glaze with a soft lustrous surface, neither matte nor glossy, and a surprising sense of tactile softness to the touch. Often, on the rim or other ridges of a form, the color will break to a warm orangish color, hinting at a sense of the clay body under the glaze (or it may suggest other images, as with the rim of Mrs. Ota's tea bowl in the Kawabata novel, Thousand Cranes). It is a subtle and rich glaze, one much favored by masters of tea. Often, but not always, designs were painted on the surface of pieces before they were glazed. These patterns, painted with an iron slip or pigment, are partially obscured and softened by the glaze over them, creating both a quiet subtlety of design and a sense of depth to the glazed surface. -- An aside about this particular piece is the difference in color of the lid of the ewer and the body of the ewer, proper, suggesting that perhaps the pieces were fired apart from one another and that, even if they were immediately side by side in the kiln, the atmosphere in the kiln (the amount of smokiness or clarity of flame) was slightly different around each of the two pieces. A problem that will be recognized by all potters, today, just as then. -- Russell Tyson Purchase Fund Income, 1966.332

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics: Dish with Pine Tree, Buncheong-style ware.
    Korean ceramics: Dish with Pine Tree, Buncheong-style ware. by Min Young-ki (1947 - ), potter and Chun Sung-woo (1934 - ), painter

    This large dish is a collaborative piece, created by Min Young-ki, potter, and Chun Sung-woo, painter, both famous contemporary artists. The piece is in the style of Buncheong-ware. In this piece, the dish was created and coated with a white slip (clay in a liquid state); the image of a tall pine tree was painted on top of the white slip, and the piece was then covered with glaze and fired. Gift of Chung Yang-mo, 2004.14

  • Thumbnail for Korean Ceramics:  Stand with a jar.
    Korean Ceramics: Stand with a jar. by unknown

    Stoneware jar on a stand, from the ancient region of Gaya in Korea. The stand accommodates the jar, which is round bottomed and could not stand on its own. The piercing of the stand base is probably visual, rather than being designed to serve a particular purpose. The side of the jar shows natural glazing, in the form of wood ash from the kiln fire that settled on the shoulder of the piece and fused with silica in the clay to create a natural, "accidental" glaze. (Gift of Juliet Boone, 1991.150.a-.b )

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics:  Jar with bird design, Arita ware.
    Japanese Ceramics: Jar with bird design, Arita ware. by unknown

    Porcelain jar with bird design painted in underglaze cobalt. Kakiemon-type Arita ware. (The Avery Brundage Collection, B64P37)

  • Thumbnail for Toko
    Toko

    A display at a traditional Japanese bar shows beautiful pottery

  • Thumbnail for Dish with PineTree Motif
    Dish with PineTree Motif

    Late 17th - early 18th century work produced at the official Nabeshima clan kiln in present-day Saga Prefecture.

  • Thumbnail for Ceramic ware
    Ceramic ware

    These are Korean cups made in the Korean traditional village. All of the objects found within the village represent how Koreans used to live in the past. Seoul, South Korea.

  • Thumbnail for Dish with red bat motif - side view
    Dish with red bat motif - side view

    Pedestal dish with underglaze enamel painting. Bat motif seen as lucky in China.

  • Thumbnail for Shallow porcelain saucer dish - detail of bottom
    Shallow porcelain saucer dish - detail of bottom

    This doucai enameled dish is decorated with maidens in a terrace garden scene within a border of pine, prunus and bamboo, the “three friends of winterâ€. These plants are emblematic of longevity, as each hearty growth survives the cold, harsh winter months. The dish is inscribed on the base with an apocryphal Ming Dynasty Zhenghua (1465-1487) reign mark, but the decoration, enamel technique and subject matter are clearly 18th century.

  • Thumbnail for Deep porcelain bowl - side view
    Deep porcelain bowl - side view

    This blue and white decorated porcelain bowl is an example of the popular bird and flower decorative motif of the early Qing Dynasty. Made at the Imperial porcelain factories at Jingtezhen in Jiangxi Provence, this bowl is inscribed with the reign mark of the Emperor Kangxi. These porcelain factories flourished during the Ming Dynasty but their output declined in quantity and quality immediately after the Manchu invasion. Under Kangxi’s patronage porcelain manufacture once again flourished and for the next 130 years some of the most exquisite porcelains were created to the delight of three successive Emperors. 8 1/2 inches in diameter.

  • Thumbnail for Deep porcelain bowl - detail of reign mark on bottom
    Deep porcelain bowl - detail of reign mark on bottom

    This blue and white decorated porcelain bowl is an example of the popular bird and flower decorative motif of the early Qing Dynasty. Made at the Imperial porcelain factories at Jingtezhen in Jiangxi Provence, this bowl is inscribed with the reign mark of the Emperor Kangxi. These porcelain factories flourished during the Ming Dynasty but their output declined in quantity and quality immediately after the Manchu invasion. Under Kangxi’s patronage porcelain manufacture once again flourished and for the next 130 years some of the most exquisite porcelains were created to the delight of three successive Emperors. 8 1/2 inches in diameter.

  • Thumbnail for Ceramic vase
    Ceramic vase

    This is an example of Japanese exported ceramics called “Satsuma ware,†which is characterized by eggshell-colored, clay bodies with finely crackled transparent glazes and painted decoration in gold and other warm tones. After the 1873 Vienna world fair, Satsuma ware became popular and spread to different cities in Japan. However, Satsuma wares were largely produced in Kyoto, Tokyo, and Yokohama. The motifs, which somehow function as a display for different kinds of ceramics/cups/plate, attempted to impress the viewers (foreigners) with the wealth of the discoveries and purchases.

  • Thumbnail for Ceramic vase (handle detail)
    Ceramic vase (handle detail)

    This is an example of Japanese exported ceramics called “Satsuma ware,†which is characterized by eggshell-colored, clay bodies with finely crackled transparent glazes and painted decoration in gold and other warm tones. After the 1873 Vienna world fair, Satsuma ware became popular and spread to different cities in Japan. However, Satsuma wares were largely produced in Kyoto, Tokyo, and Yokohama. The motifs, which somehow function as a display for different kinds of ceramics/cups/plate, attempted to impress the viewers (foreigners) with the wealth of the discoveries and purchases.

  • Thumbnail for Plate with Chinese motif of woman in a garden
    Plate with Chinese motif of woman in a garden

    9 3/4" X 9 3/4" X 1 1/2" Most likely made in Japan in the Arita manner. Depicts woman looking over a veranda railing at garden stone, flower, and butterfly.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Proto-Yueyao Jar (top)
    Chinese Proto-Yueyao Jar (top)

    4" h. Ovate body with two small luted loop handles on either side of the shoulder, narrowing down towards the slightly concave base which is marked with diminishing arcs from the cord used to shear the bottom and also with residue of the kiln spurs. A short, narrow neck surmounted by a dished mouth. The finely crazed yellowish glaze falls partially down the body revealing the buff stoneware on the lower end and bottom.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Stoneware Cup and Stand (profile view)
    Chinese Stoneware Cup and Stand (profile view)

    Cup - 2 1/8" h x 4" w. Stand - 1 1/4" h x 5 3/4" w. Petal - carved, campanulate cup, green-glazed, crazed and pooling thickly in recesses and running down on a solid, slightly splayed base in thicl pools, flat base with traces of spurs, double groove below the rim on the exterior. Design of overlapping petals repeated on the inside of the stand, encircling the cup ring, concave base, buff colored body.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Stoneware Dish (top)
    Chinese Stoneware Dish (top)

    7 1/2" w. Small dish, shallow, gently curving upward from the flat, footless bottom with traces of three large spur mounds, carved design of overlapping lotus petals with pod rings in the center, olive green crazed and glassy glaze with dark poolings in the recesses and near the base, grey body.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Jianyao "Hare's Fur" Bowl (bottom)
    Chinese Jianyao "Hare's Fur" Bowl (bottom)

    2 3/4" h x 4 5/8" w. Flared side turning upward near the rim and indented toward the footring, the dark brown stoneware is covered with a brown glaze inside and two-thirds of the way down on the outside where it has pooled, thinning on the lip. In addition to the brown, radiating streaks of black are on the interior and exterior.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Copper-red Glazed Vase (view 2)
    Chinese Copper-red Glazed Vase (view 2)

    5 7/8" h. Baluster form with amethyst colored glaze, finely crackled, fading to some irregular white areas by the foot, beveled edge flat, wide and shallow foot ring unglazed, interior unglazed, white glaze on the base inside the foot ring, splashes of deep red near and on the lip and above foot.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Incised Porcelain Bowl
    Chinese Incised Porcelain Bowl

    6 "w. Conical form with incised design of scrolled waves with combed effect, small unglazed base with shallow foot ring burnt red, rayed design just above the foot ring, greyish blue glaze

  • Thumbnail for Glazed White Vase
    Glazed White Vase

    Vase with light carving under a milky white glaze. Floral motif wraps around the piece, which has been repaired with a metal band around the lip.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Ming Style Vase - view 2
    Chinese Ming Style Vase - view 2

    7" h. Baluster form, very finely painted in brilliant underglazed-blue from the lip down, a band of ruyi heads with hanging jewel pendants, on the bottom of the neck a band of stiff overlapping leaves followed by a narrow band of diamond diaper alternating with four Buddhist emblems, the Wheel of the Law, conch shell, umbrella and vase, followed by a band of pendant three prong spear heads on the shoulder, two chilong standing at the top of a cliff with a twisted tree trunk above and behind them with rock formations, on the tall splayed foot a band of formal lotus pod lappets, stippling and mottling simulating ""heaped and piled"" effect, surface with ""orange peel"" effect, seal characters of Yongzheng and of the period

  • Thumbnail for Funerary Vases (view 1) vase 2
    Funerary Vases (view 1) vase 2

    This unusual green glaze jar belongs to a particular type of funerary vessel made during the Three Kingdoms and Western Jin dynasties. Called a hunping (spirit jar), it has a long tapered body topped by a configuration of architectural elements and animals. In this example, figures circle the jar as other creatures swarm up the neck of the container.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Jianyao Teabowl (profile)
    Chinese Jianyao Teabowl (profile)

    2" h x 4 1/4" w. The conical bowl on a narrow shallow foot ring is covered with a chocolate glaze on the exterior and interior of the reddish brown stoneware except for the base and just above the foot ring. For a related view, see related record below.