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31 hits

  • Thumbnail for Kutsche, Paul
    Kutsche, Paul by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Paul Kutsche, "Buzz," was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan on January 3, 1927. He received a B.A. from Harvard College in 1949; his M.A. in Anthropology from the University of Michigan in 1955; and his Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1961. Kutsche came to Colorado College in the fall of 1959 as an assistant professor of sociology and anthropology. He is credited with creating a separate Anthropology Department in 1964. He was named professor in 1970, and finally professor emeritus in 1993. Author of many articles in professional journals, he also co-authored, with John Van Ness, a book entitled Canones. He has been an active advocate of homosexual rights in Colorado and around the country.

  • Thumbnail for Solo or Bengawan River in central Java, site of discovery of Pithecanthropus erectus: E30
    Solo or Bengawan River in central Java, site of discovery of Pithecanthropus erectus: E30

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: E30

  • Thumbnail for Piltdown skull, fragments and cast: E26
    Piltdown skull, fragments and cast: E26

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: E26

  • Thumbnail for Anthropology Department newsletter [2005-2006 Issue No. 1 Fall]
    Anthropology Department newsletter [2005-2006 Issue No. 1 Fall] by Colorado College. Dept. of Anthropology

    The Department of Anthropology Newsletter is an occasional publication issued by the Department and provides news related to its students, faculty and alumni.

  • Thumbnail for Restorations: Pithecanthropus, Piltdown, Neanderthal, Cro-Magnon: E29
    Restorations: Pithecanthropus, Piltdown, Neanderthal, Cro-Magnon: E29

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: E29

  • Thumbnail for Grenelle skull (front and side views): E31
    Grenelle skull (front and side views): E31

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: E31

  • Thumbnail for Mauer skull: E23
    Mauer skull: E23

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: E23

  • Thumbnail for Anthropology Department newsletter [2007-2008 Issue No. 6 Spring]
    Anthropology Department newsletter [2007-2008 Issue No. 6 Spring] by Colorado College. Dept. of Anthropology

    The Department of Anthropology Newsletter is an occasional publication issued by the Department and provides news related to its students, faculty and alumni.

  • Thumbnail for Chipping method of making flint implements: E32
    Chipping method of making flint implements: E32

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: E32

  • Thumbnail for Old Acoma (17th century), Laboratory of Anthropology, Santa Fe: H87
    Old Acoma (17th century), Laboratory of Anthropology, Santa Fe: H87

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: H87

  • Thumbnail for Old San Juan, Laboratory of Anthropology, Santa Fe: H84
    Old San Juan, Laboratory of Anthropology, Santa Fe: H84

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: H84

  • Thumbnail for Anthropology Department newsletter [2006-2007 Issue No. 4 Spring]
    Anthropology Department newsletter [2006-2007 Issue No. 4 Spring] by Colorado College. Dept. of Anthropology

    The Department of Anthropology Newsletter is an occasional publication issued by the Department and provides news related to its students, faculty and alumni.

  • Thumbnail for Anthropology Department newsletter [2008-2009 Issue No. 8 Spring]
    Anthropology Department newsletter [2008-2009 Issue No. 8 Spring] by Colorado College. Dept. of Anthropology

    The Department of Anthropology Newsletter is an occasional publication issued by the Department and provides news related to its students, faculty and alumni.

  • Thumbnail for A Comparative Study: Tucson, AZ and Colorado Springs, CO Discrimination of Intersectional Identities
    A Comparative Study: Tucson, AZ and Colorado Springs, CO Discrimination of Intersectional Identities by Alvarado, Audriana Santana

    Discrimination comes in many forms especially amongst intersectional identifying people. This study focuses on the different types of discrimination that native Spanish- speaking women workers face often in Tucson, Arizona and Colorado Springs. This comparative study discusses and explores the idea of how distance from the U.S./Mexico Border plays a role in the types of discrimination these women face. Some common types of discrimination encountered include: racism, colorism, sexism, classism, and discrimination based on language fluency and/or pronunciation. Distance plays a large factor in shaping political and social cultures of Tucson, Arizona and Colorado Springs. The results show that in Tucson, Arizona, due to its closeness to the Border, there are many more Spanish-speakers and there are clear legal policies that particularly target Spanish-speaking populations. Meanwhile in Colorado Springs, there are lower percentages of Spanish-speaking populations, therefore, the discrimination can be much stronger since some people may not be accustomed to hearing Spanish being spoken, or sometimes not as strong as in Tucson because there are not as many laws directly targeted towards these populations since Colorado Springs is further from the Border. That’s not to say it doesn’t exist, because it is clear that social culture and media both target Spanish-speaking populations more often than laws in Colorado Springs. Both cities’ social and political cultures strongly impact the types of discrimination these women face in this study.

  • Thumbnail for Oyster feuds : an analysis of  conflicting discourses
    Oyster feuds : an analysis of conflicting discourses by Leslie-Bole, Hayley

    Using Drake’s Bay Oyster Farm as an example, the conflict between the National Park Service and local community is examined. To analyze this conflict from a legal, historical or political perspective does not fully explain why these tensions came to a head in such an extreme way in the Oyster Farm battle, or illuminate larger implications for land use in the United States. I argue that a post-structural analysis of discourse reveals larger difficulties that have made this conflict virtually unresolvable and damaging to the community, and it indicates that conflicting discourses are present and problematic in other National Parks in the United States. In this paper I examine how the Federal Government, the NPS and the employees of Point Reyes National Seashore have created a powerful discourse of conservation, that has long conflicted with a counter discourse of sustainable local agriculture in the area. The existence of agriculture and aquaculture within PRNS presents a friction point between these two discourses. This friction culminated in a controversy over the removal of Drake’s Bay Oyster Company, and was escalated by a community that has a history of activism and resistance to change. This conflict became a political and legal battle that illuminated the differences in power, scale, and ideologies between the participants in the conflicting discourses.

  • Thumbnail for Cro-Magnon skull: E28
    Cro-Magnon skull: E28

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: E28

  • Thumbnail for Flaking method of making flint implements: E33
    Flaking method of making flint implements: E33

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: E33

  • Thumbnail for Laboratory of Anthropology. Santa Fe: G69
    Laboratory of Anthropology. Santa Fe: G69

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: G69

  • Thumbnail for Zuni olla. Laboratory of Anthropology, Santa Fe: H91
    Zuni olla. Laboratory of Anthropology, Santa Fe: H91

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: H91

  • Thumbnail for Anthropology Department newsletter [2005-2006 Issue No. 2 Spring]
    Anthropology Department newsletter [2005-2006 Issue No. 2 Spring] by Colorado College. Dept. of Anthropology

    The Department of Anthropology Newsletter is an occasional publication issued by the Department and provides news related to its students, faculty and alumni.

  • Thumbnail for Capitalizing on Community: A Critical Discourse on the Neoliberal Management of Diabetes and Inequity
    Capitalizing on Community: A Critical Discourse on the Neoliberal Management of Diabetes and Inequity by Mulhern, Morgan

    I have taken up the difficult task in this thesis of ethnographically weaving together many strands of theory, practice, and analysis into a coherent narrative about type II diabetes and racial/ethnic disparity to answer the questions: What is the experience like for community health workers for Hispanic and Latina diabetics living in Colorado Springs, CO, and how does their clientele reflect disparate social histories? Further, how can Colorado Springs as a community better understand and strategically address public health efforts? The literature offered in this paper positions a single disease at the intersection of several historical moments and scales of analyses. This work is not meant to be a meta-narrative on the phenomenon, but rather a composite picture of public health framing of type II diabetes at a localized level to prompt collaboration to create an integrated system of health.

  • Thumbnail for The Dead Man’s Cave Gulch Cache: Strategies for Historic Caches
    The Dead Man’s Cave Gulch Cache: Strategies for Historic Caches by Axelrod, Ella Nicole

    Historical Archaeology is a discipline informed by research in the archaeological and documentary record. However, the details of the research process for historical assemblages are not often documented in a way that can be applied to other cases. This paper discusses the methodological and research strategies used in the study of the Dead Man’s Cave Gulch (DMCG) cache. Little has been written on historic caches and further documentation is merited. Beginning with presenting the context of research strategies in historic archaeology and previous research on caches, this paper will outline resources available for researchers, including resources in the state of Colorado. Finally, it will present the results of the DMCG cache study.

  • Thumbnail for Skulls of pithacanthrophus, Piltdown, Neaderthal, Cro-Magnon: E27
    Skulls of pithacanthrophus, Piltdown, Neaderthal, Cro-Magnon: E27

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: E27

  • Thumbnail for Homo rhodesiensis (front view): E25
    Homo rhodesiensis (front view): E25

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: E25

  • Thumbnail for Homo rhodesiensis (side view): E24
    Homo rhodesiensis (side view): E24

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: E24