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  • Thumbnail for Students studying in Tutt Library (basement)  [2011 Block 5]
    Students studying in Tutt Library (basement) [2011 Block 5]

    Photograph taken in the basement of Tutt Library. This is a photo of students creating a study space in the moveable shelving area which is located in the basement of Tutt.

  • Thumbnail for Creating undergraduate internships for non-LIS  students in academic libraries
    Creating undergraduate internships for non-LIS students in academic libraries by Dahl, Candice

    This paper provides a framework for creating undergraduate internships in academic libraries, specifically those offered in collaboration with subject-based academic departments at universities where no degrees in library science are offered. Very little of the scholarly literature addresses this type of internship in particular, and broadly applicable elements of planning and implementation have not been clearly articulated in the literature. This paper proposes that there are several basic elements to consider regardless of situation-specific conditions. These include incentives and compensation for the intern, structure of the internship, projects, and documentation. Each element is considered and described, using internships hosted at the Murray Library of the University of Saskatchewan as examples.

  • Thumbnail for Working together : joint-use Canadian academic and public libraries
    Working together : joint-use Canadian academic and public libraries by Walker, Keith , Sarjeant-Jenkins, Rachel

    The research purpose was to learn about existing joint use public-academic libraries in Canada including their establishment, structure, benefits, and challenges and to determine the requirements for successful partnerships. Following a literature review, a short survey was conducted to gather data on the number, location, and types of public-academic library partnerships. In-depth telephone interviews were then held with key personnel from joint use libraries to learn more about the libraries and the nature of the partnerships. The research surfaced three unique examples of joint use public-academic libraries. In addition, key requirements for successful partnerships that were posited through the literature review were supported by the research data – commitment, a shared vision, and a need that requires fulfillment. Possible limitations of the research are the initial survey’s reliance on responses from academic library directors and the survey timing. There is limited information about partnerships between Canadian public and academic libraries and no single document that brings together data on partnerships across Canada. With this study, public and academic libraries will learn of successful joint use Canadian public-academic libraries along with the key requirements for sustainable partnerships.

  • Thumbnail for Chronicle [2006-2007 Winter]
    Chronicle [2006-2007 Winter] by Colorado College. Charles L. Tutt Library

    The Chronicle is an occasional publication of the Charles Leaming Tutt Library at Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Students studying in Tutt Library (third floor)  [2011 Block 5]
    Students studying in Tutt Library (third floor) [2011 Block 5]

    Photographs taken on the third floor of Tutt Library. This collection of photos includes students studying on the third floor of the library and photos shot from the third floor looking down into the atrium area of the library.

  • Thumbnail for Building a participatory culture : collaborating with student organizations for twenty-first century library instruction
    Building a participatory culture : collaborating with student organizations for twenty-first century library instruction by Buhler, Amy , Ewing, Stacey R. , Clapp, Melissa J., 1977- , Johnson, Margeaux

    Today’s students are critical thinkers, collaborators, and creators. They expect to participate in twenty-first century learning environments not as passive information consumers (think lectures), but as active contributors (think team-based problem-solving). There are opportunities for instruction librarians to collaborate directly with student-led organizations. These partnerships have the potential to increase attendance at library events and provide platforms for students to engage in richer forms of exploratory learning that incorporate twenty-first century skills. This article will discuss the literature surrounding library instruction collaborations, identify “Librarian–Student Organization Collaborations” as an important form of partnership, and supply specific case studies of successful library instruction events based on these collaborations.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Academic library outreach : beyond the campus walls
    Review of Academic library outreach : beyond the campus walls by Pope, Barbara M.

    Barbara Pope reviews "Academic Library Outreach: Beyond the Campus Walls." This collection of essays, written by academic librarians, explores academic library outreach from several different perspectives.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Working together : collaborative information practices for organizational learning
    Review of Working together : collaborative information practices for organizational learning by Sellers, Minna

    In this article, Minna Sellers reviews Mary Somerville’s book, "Working Together: Collaborative Information Practices for Organizational Learning." Adaptability is a key indicator of an organization’s capacity to respond successfully to change. Library organizations are facing enormous pressures to adapt to societal changes in order to remain relevant. This book provides a useful framework for reconstructing library organizations addressing sustainable change through collaborative processes.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Librarians as community partners :  an outreach handbook
    Review of Librarians as community partners : an outreach handbook by Abate, Anne K.

    Anne Abate reviews the book, "Librarians as Community Partners: An Outreach Handbook." This book, edited by Carol Smallwood, is a collection of essays about library outreach programs and includes contributions from public, academic, school, and special libraries across the United States. Each of the thirty-six essays describes a specific program implemented to increase awareness of the library and services offered, the steps taken to bring it to fruition, and the benefits to the library and community.

  • Thumbnail for Chronicle [2005-2006 Spring]
    Chronicle [2005-2006 Spring] by Colorado College. Charles L. Tutt Library

    The Chronicle is an occasional publication of the Charles Leaming Tutt Library at Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Chronicle [2006-2007 Fall]
    Chronicle [2006-2007 Fall] by Colorado College. Charles L. Tutt Library

    The Chronicle is an occasional publication of the Charles Leaming Tutt Library at Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Students studying in Tutt Library (second floor)  [2011 Block 5]
    Students studying in Tutt Library (second floor) [2011 Block 5]

    Photographs taken on the second floor of Tutt Library. This collection of photos includes students studying in the library atrium, second floor south location and at study carrels.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Collaboration in libraries and learning environments
    Review of Collaboration in libraries and learning environments by Hedreen, Rebecca

    Rebecca Hedreen reviews, "Review of Collaboration in Libraries and Learning Environments" edited by Maxine Melling and Margaret Weaver. This book is not about librarians collaborating with faculty in online courseware, or even the merging of library and IT desks. This book is a collection of interesting and relevant case studies, many involving what are often called Learning or Information Commons. Not all of them involve libraries, and for many that do, the library is not the focus.

  • Thumbnail for  Review of “Social networking tools for academic libraries”
    Review of “Social networking tools for academic libraries” by Hicks, Alison

    Alison Hicks reviews the article, "Social Networking Tools for Academic Libraries." The authors of this paper, Samuel Kai-Wah Chu and Helen S. Du, investigate the use of social media in academic libraries across the globe.

  • Thumbnail for Review : Embedded librarians : moving beyond one-shot instruction
    Review : Embedded librarians : moving beyond one-shot instruction by Vella, Lia

    Lia Vella reviews the book, "Embedded Librarians: Moving Beyond One-Shot Instruction." This book is edited by Cassandra Kvenild and Kaijsa Calkins. In her review, Vella shares, "For the first time last year, my library tried an “embedded” relationship with a required freshman class. As a Reference & Instruction Librarian, I attended the lectures, worked with each of the class sections, and created and staffed a “Help Station” with a rotating display of relevant books and articles. This book, Embedded Librarians: Moving Beyond One-Shot Instruction, was, therefore, of interest to me and helped me to formulate ideas about how I wanted to implement my own program."

  • Thumbnail for A collaborative schema for electronic resource description
    A collaborative schema for electronic resource description by Sorensen, Charlene , Harkema, Craig , Tharani, Karim

    Academic libraries are attempting to manage growing collections of diverse electronic resources in a chaotic environment of evolving standards and systems. The transition from a print-dominated resource environment to an electronic one has complicated the decision-making process. Current discourse primarily focuses on meeting patron needs and has distracted researchers from looking at librarian needs. The authors discovered that librarians want a better understanding of the nature, extent, and diversity of electronic resources for decision making, assessment, and accountability. Drawing from the collaborative methods and design philosophies of other disciplines, this paper outlines an approach to leveraging Web 2.0 philosophy and Business Intelligence techniques to address these needs. This approach will serve as a guide for academic librarians to transcend their current practices in order to develop innovative, collaborative, and holistic approaches to the joint stewardship of library electronic resource collections.

  • Thumbnail for Chronicle [2008-2009 Spring]
    Chronicle [2008-2009 Spring] by Colorado College. Charles L. Tutt Library

    The Chronicle is an occasional publication of the Charles Leaming Tutt Library at Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Chronicle [2004-2005 Spring]
    Chronicle [2004-2005 Spring] by Colorado College. Charles L. Tutt Library

    The Chronicle is an occasional publication of the Charles Leaming Tutt Library at Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Sustainable collaborations : libraries link dual-credit programs to P-20 initiatives
    Sustainable collaborations : libraries link dual-credit programs to P-20 initiatives by Bruch, Courtney , Frank, Katherine

    This article argues for collaboration among academic libraries, academic departments, and high schools in order to strengthen articulation between the secondary and post-secondary sectors. It features work from a year-long project made possible by an LSTA grant and involving the Colorado State University-Pueblo Library, the English Composition Program, and several southern Colorado high schools that participate in the University’s dual-credit program titled “Senior-to-Sophomore.” This article outlines the process of using information literacy (IL) instruction to foster relationships among secondary and post-secondary instructors, improve communication between instructors and library staff within both sectors, and ultimately strengthen teaching and learning. Major challenges to an ongoing successful partnership include resources and program sustainability. The ultimate benefit, however, is the cross-institutional partnerships focused on IL instruction that benefit not only secondary to post-secondary articulation, but also the entire pre-school through graduate level (P-20) educational continuum.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Interdisciplinarity and academic libraries
    Review of Interdisciplinarity and academic libraries by O'Neill, Ann L.

    Ann L. O’Neill reviews, "Interdisciplinarity and Academic Libraries." This book examines the definition of interdisciplinarity and the related terms of multidisciplinarity, transdisciplinarity and cross-disciplinarity and how these can, and have, affected the work in academic libraries. The ten essays range from definitions and history of interdisciplinarity to the work implications in specific areas of today’s academic libraries.

  • Thumbnail for Campus collaboration from a martial arts perspective
    Campus collaboration from a martial arts perspective by Perini, Michael

    Thinkers have been applying longstanding martial arts philosophies to a variety of professional genres for years, particularly in the business realm. Where these ideas find less traction, though, is in the field of education, specifically higher education, as some of the philosophies operate better in the boardroom than in academe. However, much of the experience associated with martial arts provides an alternate prism to view conflicts and difficulties within higher education and, specifically, for my purposes, in libraries. This discussion draws on my experience as a martial artist as well as my theoretical and experiential learning in higher education and academic libraries in order to expand the conversation on collaboration.

  • Thumbnail for Faculty in-service : how to boost academic library services
    Faculty in-service : how to boost academic library services by Lucas, Debra

    This article discusses a collaborative approach to educate college faculty about the library to encourage faculty to engage and participate in services such as library instruction, interlibrary loan, course reserves, and research desk assistance. The more faculty know about the library, the more that they use them. Well informed faculty create students who will also be interested in the library. In-servicing is recommended because it allows librarians to market the library. Creating a well-planned library in-service also creates an opportunity to highlight a librarian’s teaching and research skills.

  • Thumbnail for “She has a vocabulary I just don’t have” : faculty culture and information literacy collaboration
    “She has a vocabulary I just don’t have” : faculty culture and information literacy collaboration by Gardner, Carolyn Caffrey , White-Farnham, Jamie

    The authors describe difficulties pertaining to discipline-specific discourse and identity among collaborators during the process of revising the information literacy component of a first-year writing program. Hardesty’s term “faculty culture” offers a frame through which to understand resistance and tension among otherwise engaged faculty and situates this experience within the uncomfortable history between faculty and librarians who may be perceived as “inauthentic” faculty. The authors suggest ways to improve communication between librarians and writing program faculty when collaborating on infor-mation literacy instruction.

  • Thumbnail for Nontraditional partnerships in pursuit of the  “information infrastructure”
    Nontraditional partnerships in pursuit of the “information infrastructure” by Kramer, Jason

    The New York State Higher Education Initiative (NYSHEI) represents the public and private academic and research libraries of New York, and differs from other state-based academic library organizations in both its size and mission. NYSHEI holds about 150 member institutions, including all 87 of the state’s public colleges and universities, and nine ARL members. Founded in 2002, NYSHEI evolved into its current form in 2007 by adopting a focus on political advocacy. NYSHEI applies its diverse collection of collaborating libraries toward achieving a statewide “information infrastructure” that supports not just the academic enterprise, but all research, innovation, and entrepreneurialism in New York. An important lesson learned during the formative phase of NYSHEI is that collaboration as a strategic value can be fairly meaningless. Rightly understood, collaboration is a tactic that helps two or more parties attain separate but shared aims. As such, NYSHEI approaches information resources as a required utility for the modern era, and actively works with partners in the business community, state government, and health care fields to promote widespread access to information resources.

  • Thumbnail for Chronicle [2003-2004 Spring]
    Chronicle [2003-2004 Spring] by Colorado College. Charles L. Tutt Library

    The Chronicle is an occasional publication of the Charles Leaming Tutt Library at Colorado College.