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  • Thumbnail for The effect of demographic, job, and organization characteristics on perceptions of work-life balance
    The effect of demographic, job, and organization characteristics on perceptions of work-life balance by Bullock, Liz H.

    In the past half-century, an emphasis on work-life balance has emerged as a result of a changing labor force. Researchers have examined a variety of factors to explain how individual perceptions of work-life balance are influenced; some studies focus mainly on micro factors, such as gender or race, while others look to larger-scale elements such as organizational structure or job characteristics. This thesis sought to compare both micro and macro factors to see if work-life balance was primarily a function of demographic, job, or organization characteristics. A total of 269 professional employees at over 100 domestic and international organizations were surveyed, and results were analyzed using three linear regression models. Out of all the factors that were significant in predicting work-life balance in the models observed, only one—having four or more children—was a condition that organizations cannot control for. Interestingly, all of the other factors that proved significant—job autonomy, average hours worked per week, job pressure, and workplace support—are attributes that organizations can influence. Thus, this thesis suggests that organizations have a powerful role in helping their professional employees achieve a comfortable work-life balance.