Colorado College Logo

  DigitalCC

Use AND (in capitals) to search multiple keywords.
Example: harmonica AND cobos

10 hits

  • Thumbnail for Tea Room image 4 - tokonoma
    Tea Room image 4 - tokonoma by Seiji Suzuki

    The alcove, or tokonoma, is slightly elevated above the tearoom floor and may originally have been used to seat someone of high rank. In the medieval age, the alcove became a sacred space to display a scroll with calligraphy or a simple flower arrangement. In a formal tea gathering, the scroll offers a profound message upon which guests may meditate; the natural flower arrangement reflects the pure spirit of the host.

  • Thumbnail for Tea Room image 3
    Tea Room image 3 by Seiji Suzuki

    The circular window of the tearoom is not designed for looking outward. It is kept shut so that guests focus inward and ultimately reflect on their own state of mind. Zen scrolls often depict the mind with a circle written in one brush stroke. The subdued light in a tearoom lends itself to contemplation. The tearoom is a fragile work of art. It requires considerable care and delicate handling. Heavy jewelry, watches and such are never worn in the tearoom, for they may scratch the wood or mats. Shoes are removed and feet should be covered. It is traditional in Japan to wear white socks. Hands are washed and clothing is clean so as not to harm the mats.

  • Thumbnail for Shakyamuni Stong Sku (or 1000 Bodies) Thangka
    Shakyamuni Stong Sku (or 1000 Bodies) Thangka by Unknown

    54 (L) x 29 (W) inches. Painting on cloth in U-Tri, central Tibetan style. Shakyamuni, the Historical Buddha, sits cross legged in the middle in the teaching pose with 49 other representations of Buddha I the background. The central figure is line drawn in orange in on a blue and orange lotus throne with a blue and gold rayed halo. On the reverse is a poem compose by Phurchok Champa, tutor of the 13th Dalai Lama in gold ink and a mantra in black ink. this thangka is a reproduction of one of a series of 21 thangkas commissioned by Champa Tsultrim and Changchub Gelek. This type of repetitive multi-image thangka was done in order to gain merit. Mounted as a scroll with red and gold silk brocade frames on polychrome floral silk brocade with yellow and red silk dust covers and plain silver scroll ends.

  • Thumbnail for Shiva in His Yabyum with his Sakti
    Shiva in His Yabyum with his Sakti by Unknown

    Bronze; 6-1/2 inches (H) x 2 (D) x 3 (W).

  • Thumbnail for Wheel of Life Thangka
    Wheel of Life Thangka by Unknown

    64 (L) x 39 (W) inches. Yama, the Lord of Death holds the Wheel of Life in his mouth and claws. A three-eyed growling bear-like creature with fangs, clawed hands and feet, he wears blue floral wrist and ankle bracelets, a tiger skin loin cloth and a five-skull crown. The Wheel he holds symbolizes the endless cycle of rebirth. In the center are the Three Poisons: the Snake carried by the Pigeon attacking the Pig. The Six Conditions of rebirth are depicted i the body of the Wheel and the Twelve Causes of rebirth are on the rim of the Wheel. Mounted as a scroll with orange and turquoise silk frames on purple silk brocade with a green and red silk dust covers and plain silver scroll ends.

  • Thumbnail for Tea Room image 1
    Tea Room image 1 by Seiji Suzuki

    The tearoom is a masterpiece of traditional Japanese architectural design and artisanship. It incorporates both formal shoin-style elements, based on the design of a study or library in a Buddhist temple, as well as the sukiya elements of a humble cottage.

  • Thumbnail for Tea Room image 2 (detail)
    Tea Room image 2 (detail) by Seiji Suzuki

    The tearoom is a masterpiece of traditional Japanese architectural design and artisanship. It incorporates both formal shoin-style elements, based on the design of a study or library in a Buddhist temple, as well as the sukiya elements of a humble cottage. The circular window of the tearoom is not designed for looking outward. It is kept shut so that guests focus inward and ultimately reflect on their own state of mind. Zen scrolls often depict the mind with a circle written in one brush stroke. The subdued light in a tearoom lends itself to contemplation.

  • Thumbnail for Tea Room image 6 (tea sets)
    Tea Room image 6 (tea sets) by Seiji Suzuki

    A traditional "mizuya" or preparation room sits apart from the tearoom. Typically, the most honored guest sits closest to the alcove, but our tea room is designed in a configuration known as geza-doko, which allows visitors to enjoy a full view during a demonstration. The first guest sits closest to the outer-most edge of the tea room.

  • Thumbnail for Tea Room image 5 (detail) - tokonoma
    Tea Room image 5 (detail) - tokonoma by Seiji Suzuki

    The alcove, or tokonoma, is slightly elevated above the tearoom floor and may originally have been used to seat someone of high rank. In the medieval age, the alcove became a sacred space to display a scroll with calligraphy or a simple flower arrangement. In a formal tea gathering, the scroll offers a profound message upon which guests may meditate; the natural flower arrangement reflects the pure spirit of the host. The uneven and staggered cherrywood shelves in the tokonoma display porcelains from the Reeves Collection. In medieval Japan, the shelves often held writing implements and Buddhist scripture. A dove-shaped piece of wood curves upward at the end of the shelf. This traditional architectural detail prevents a writing brush from rolling off the shelf. The recessed hardware details in the cabinets are in the shape of a chrysanthemum.

  • Thumbnail for Chopstick and Knife Set
    Chopstick and Knife Set by Unknown

    Chopstick and knife set, wood, with brass mounts, Sino-Tibetan.