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  • Thumbnail for Tamba pottery, view 02., pots in a shop window
    Tamba pottery, view 02., pots in a shop window

    A group of pots in a shop window show the strong traditional form of Tamba jars. Traditionally made as storage jars, the thick rim allowed a cord to be tied securely around the neck of the jar, to hold a cloth in place to close the mouth of the jar. These bold, simple forms were the result of a direct vocabulary of form handed down through generations of potters over the centuries. The forms were often left totally unglazed and the decoration of the surface would come from the action of the fire and the depositing of ash on the surface, forming a natural glaze, as is the case on the second jar from the left in this photo. The two jars on the right probably had an ash glaze poured on them before they were placed in the kiln and the contrast of the runny dark green ash glaze against the dark iron red of the unglazed clay surfaces creates a dynamic pattern. The two pieces on the right have lugs ("loops" of clay) on their shoulders; originally such lugs were made to allow a lid to be

  • Thumbnail for Tamba pottery, view 01.,  fields in valley in front of village
    Tamba pottery, view 01., fields in valley in front of village

    The ancient pottery village of Tachikui, in the region formerly known as the Tamba region, is commonly called, simply, Tamba. It is in the mountains west of Kyoto and north of Kobe. One of the so-called "six ancient kilns" of Japan (the others being Echizen, Bizen, Shigaraki, Tokoname, and Seto), pottery has been produced continuously at this site since the Kamakura period, an unbroken tradition of perhaps 700 or 800 years. It is still (as of 1972, at any rate) a quiet, rural village built along the base of mountain, facing across the rice fields in the valley. A number of the families in the village continue the traditional pattern of being part-time farmers and part-time potters.

  • Thumbnail for East Asian Ceramics:  Then and Now.  04, Shino-ware Jar by Rosanjin
    East Asian Ceramics: Then and Now. 04, Shino-ware Jar by Rosanjin by Kitaoji Rosanjin

    This Shino-ware jar was created by Rosanjin, a great Japanese ceramic artist of the first half of the 20th century. Rosanjin, a restaurateur by profession, was an "amateur" potter, who bagan making pottery because he could not find ceramic pieces that he felt were what he wanted to use in his restaurant. He often looked back to earlier traditions to find forms, glazes, techniques, and ideas from which to draw in his own modern work. In this piece, obviously, he has referred to the tradition of shino-ware with underglaze iron brush decoration. He has applied them to his own contemporary form, although it is interesting to note the undulations of the rim of the piece and to then look at the rims of many Momoyama and Edo period shino-ware tea ceremony bowls. The brown brushed design on this side of the piece are said to be stylized representations of pine trees; on the other side of the piece are forms suggesting birds. The orangish areas on the surface are areas where the glaze was

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Model of the immediate target area after the atomic blast
    Hiroshima: Model of the immediate target area after the atomic blast

    This model from the Peace Memorial Museum presents what remained in the central target area after the explosion of the atomic bomb. It represents the site on the afternoon of August 6, or perhaps on August 7, when the consuming fires had died out. The remains now known as the A-Bomb Dome are in the upper left. Because the force of the blast was almost directly down on that brick building, rather than outward, some of the walls remained standing, although the interior was entirely crushed and collapsed by the blast. Several other buildings in the vicinity also remained standing or partially standing; they were buildings constructed of high quality steel-reinforced concrete. Everything else is gone, either destroyed by the initial force of the blast or consumed by the raging fires that immediately swept the city, leaving essentially nothing by the end of the day.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Immediately after the Bombing, photo and statement by Yoshito Matsushige.
    Hiroshima: Immediately after the Bombing, photo and statement by Yoshito Matsushige. by Matsushige, Yoshito.

    This is another of the very rare photographs of the immediate aftermath of the bombing. The photo, taken by Yoshito Matsushige, shows victims huddled at the west end of the Miyuki Bridge, 2,270 meters from the hypocenter, about 11:00 a.m., August 6, 1945. In the book, The Viewfinder Clouded with Tears, Mr. Matsushige writes, "I fought with myself for 30 minutes before I could take the first picture. After taking the first, I grew strangely calm and wanted to get closer. I took about ten steps forward and tried to snap another, but the scenes I saw were so gruesome my viewfinder clouded with tears."

  • Thumbnail for Nagasaki, Atomic Bomb Museum: Victims, photo of father carrying son
    Nagasaki, Atomic Bomb Museum: Victims, photo of father carrying son

    This image is of a photograph displayed in the Atomic Bomb Museum at Nagasaki. The photo is titled, \"A father searches for a relief station with his injured child\" and the label accompanying the photo says, \"This man was searching for help near the base of Zenza-machi (present-day Tenjin-machi), tightly embracing his bandaged child. Both had apparently suffered injuries. The dried blood on the child\'s face is gruesome evidence of the severity of the wounds. (Photograph by Yosuke Yamahata)\"

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics:  Covered box by Kawai Hirotsugu.
    Japanese Ceramics: Covered box by Kawai Hirotsugu. by Kawai, Hirotsugu (b. 1919)

    Porcelain box with underglaze cobalt and overglaze enamel decoration. (Gift of William Vredenburg, 1991.102.a-.c )

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Atomic Bomb Mushroom Cloud  01
    Hiroshima: Atomic Bomb Mushroom Cloud 01

    Photograph of the mushroom cloud rising over Hiroshima taken about two minutes after the explosion. Photograph taken from the Kanda bridge, Furuichi-cho, about 7 kilometers from the hypocenter, the point of detonation.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 14  --  "Injured dying one after the next, people looking for family"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 14 -- "Injured dying one after the next, people looking for family" by Anonymous

    Injured dying one after the next, people looking for familyured d -- Explanation by the Artist: king fMorning, noon and night, the injured died. White medicines applied [to] burns made pores look bright red. Many were carrying huge loads, calling out, searching for parents, siblings, friends. Relief teams called, 'Anyone here from such and such neighborhood?' I think it was about the 8th when three young soldiers saluted and left. After they left, we heard they were suicide troops sent in from Etajima island. -- The artist was 19 at the time of the bombing, 49 at the time he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951: Cityscape as viewed from Tokyo Tower
    Japan, 1951: Cityscape as viewed from Tokyo Tower

    Kyoto and Tokyo scenes, symbolic of modern Japan. 1966 rebuilt city viewed from the Tokyo Tower- electric wires , modern cars, highways, buildings. Japan is the most highly industrialized country of the Orient. She depends on international trade for the means of her national livelihood. --This was the description to accompany this image, as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Park --  Memorial to children who perished  in the blast, 03
    Hiroshima: Peace Park -- Memorial to children who perished in the blast, 03

    Detail of the memorial to the children who perished in the atomic blast on August 6, 1945, showing the statue at the memorial and strings of paper cranes left by school children visiting the memorial.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Small town open front markets
    Japan, 1951: Small town open front markets

    Open front shops are seen in smaller towns --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Artisan making tatami mats
    Japan, 1951: Artisan making tatami mats

    Rice straw is used to make rope, mats, and sandals. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Aerial acrobatics in a neighborhood celebration
  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Burn victims of the blast, 02.
  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  National Peace Memorial Hall, photographic registry of victims
    Hiroshima: National Peace Memorial Hall, photographic registry of victims

    Approximately 240,000 names of victims who were exposed to the atomic bomb in Hiroshima are written in the Hiroshima Register of Deceased Atomic Bomb Victims. It is stored in the Cenotaph for the A-bomb Victims (Memorial Monument for Hiroshima, City of Peace). -- A room in the National Peace Memorial Hall houses a searchable registry of the names and, when available, photographs of the victims. The photographs of the victims are displayed serially on this wall panel monitor. The photos include persons of all ages and stations in life; the bomb destroyed lives indiscriminately.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Woman and children at neighborhood shop
    Japan, 1951: Woman and children at neighborhood shop

    In winter, warmth in a Japanese home is supplied from charcoal in a beautiful hibachi. On a cold November day this mother carries her son on her back, covered by a heavy kimono which keeps them both warm. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Tokyo office building with vent pipes from heating
    Japan, 1951: Tokyo office building with vent pipes from heating

    'Tokyo Pipe Organ' -1950 version of heating a large office building from which the radiators were taken for scrap metal during the war. --This was the description to accompany this image, as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Itinerant rice processor puffing rice
    Japan, 1951: Itinerant rice processor puffing rice

    We eat four times as much protein as the average Japanese. Puffed rice made on the spot by an itinerant processor. He puffs the rice supplied to him. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Local fish vendor
    Japan, 1951: Local fish vendor

    Women daily buy fresh fish. Products of the sea are the chief source of protein in the Japanese diet. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Unloading of whale meat
    Japan, 1951: Unloading of whale meat

    Whale meat, brought in refrigerator ships from the Arctic regions is unloaded to be sold from retail meat shops. --This was the description to accompany this image, as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Memorial Mound, paper cranes
    Hiroshima: Memorial Mound, paper cranes

    Strings of paper cranes left at the Memorial Mound in the Peace Memorial Park.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  National Peace Memorial Hall, sign stating number of fatalities from the bomb by the end of 1945
    Hiroshima: National Peace Memorial Hall, sign stating number of fatalities from the bomb by the end of 1945

    The A-bomb devastated nearly all administrative agencies and destoyed official documents. Thus, the exact number of deaths due to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima remains unknown. Many victims were never identified. -- According to a document submitted by the city of Hiroshima to the United Nations in 1976 entitled 'For the Elimination of Nuclear Weapons and the Reduction of All Armed Forces and All Armaments,' an extimated 140,000 (plus or minus 10,000) people died as a result of the A-bomb between August 6, 1945, and the end of December that year.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Children exposed to radiation before birth; young A-bomb microcephaly patient with her mother
    Hiroshima: Children exposed to radiation before birth; young A-bomb microcephaly patient with her mother

    Many children who were exposed to the radiation of the A-bomb blast while still in their mother's wombs were born with what has become known as "A-bomb microcephaly." Such children suffered from mental retardation or physical disabilities. They have been cared for by relatives, with independence for them being difficult or impossible. As their care-giving relatives age, assistance for them has become a major issue.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Children’s Peace Monument, bell inside the monument
    Hiroshima: Children’s Peace Monument, bell inside the monument

    Within the protection of the monument rising above them are several objects, including a bell, a golden crane, and an inscription carved on block of stone. The golden crane is on the end of the pull for the bell and visitors may grasp it to ring the bell as a prayer for peace. The bell is inscribed with two phrases, “A Thousand Paper Cranes†and “Peace on the Earth and in the Heavens,†written in the handwriting of Dr. Hideki Yukawa, Nobel Laureate in Physics. Beneath the bell is the block of stone bearing a carved inscription that reads, “This is our cry. This is our prayer. For building peace in this world.â€