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  • Thumbnail for Tamba pottery, view 04., communal kiln
    Tamba pottery, view 04., communal kiln

    Again, this is a photo of the long communal kiln at Tamba-Tachikui. This is the lower portion of the kiln, which stretches on up the hill. The larger pieces of wood stacked on the left here will be used at the beginning of the firing of the kiln, because the large pieces burn slowly, allowing a slow heat rise in the early stages of firing to dry out pots in the kiln. This side of the kiln shows stoke holes for fuel; the doors into the chambers are on the other side of the kiln. It is a tube kiln, with the axis of the arch running up the length of the kiln. The tube is segmented into chambers by walls that cut across the kiln -- essentially, like the structure of a piece of bamboo, and this style of kiln is sometimes called a "split bamboo kiln." In a smaller version, the same structure can be seen clearly in the photos of the Ichino workshop kiln, images ecasia000334 and 335.

  • Thumbnail for Tamba pottery, view 06., Ichino home and workshop
    Tamba pottery, view 06., Ichino home and workshop

    This is the home and workshop of the Ichino family, one of the foremost pottery families in Tamba-Tachikui.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Immediately after the Bombing, photo and statement by Yoshito Matsushige.
    Hiroshima: Immediately after the Bombing, photo and statement by Yoshito Matsushige. by Matsushige, Yoshito.

    This is another of the very rare photographs of the immediate aftermath of the bombing. The photo, taken by Yoshito Matsushige, shows victims huddled at the west end of the Miyuki Bridge, 2,270 meters from the hypocenter, about 11:00 a.m., August 6, 1945. In the book, The Viewfinder Clouded with Tears, Mr. Matsushige writes, "I fought with myself for 30 minutes before I could take the first picture. After taking the first, I grew strangely calm and wanted to get closer. I took about ten steps forward and tried to snap another, but the scenes I saw were so gruesome my viewfinder clouded with tears."

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics:  Covered box by Kawai Hirotsugu.
    Japanese Ceramics: Covered box by Kawai Hirotsugu. by Kawai, Hirotsugu (b. 1919)

    Porcelain box with underglaze cobalt and overglaze enamel decoration. (Gift of William Vredenburg, 1991.102.a-.c )

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Dedication of the Cenotaph, 1952.
    Hiroshima: Dedication of the Cenotaph, 1952. by Photo courtesy of Chugoku Shimbun, the Chugoku newspaper

    On August 6, 1952, seven years after the bombing of Hiroshima, five war orphans unveiled the cenotaph for the victims of the A-bomb blast. It is known as the Memorial Monument for Hiroshima, City of Peace. Approximately 1,000 persons attended the unveiling ceremony. Each year, on August 6, the memorial service is held in front of this monument located in the Peace Memorial Park. In this photo from 1952, one can still see private houses that had been rebuilt after the war in the area that is now the Peace Park.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Victims of the atomic bomb blast.
    Hiroshima: Victims of the atomic bomb blast.

    This photograph, taken by US Army investigators on November 13, 1945, shows a woman's back and arms disfigured with growths called keloids. These growths hindered the movement of joints and were the cause of great suffering, both physical and emotional.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Atomic Bomb Mushroom Cloud  01
    Hiroshima: Atomic Bomb Mushroom Cloud 01

    Photograph of the mushroom cloud rising over Hiroshima taken about two minutes after the explosion. Photograph taken from the Kanda bridge, Furuichi-cho, about 7 kilometers from the hypocenter, the point of detonation.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Atomic Bomb Mushroom Cloud  02
    Hiroshima: Atomic Bomb Mushroom Cloud 02

    The mushroom cloud at Hiroshima, photographed 2 - 3 minutes after the explosion, taken from Mikumari Gorge, in Fuchu-cho, about 6.5 km from the hypocenter.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 20  --  "The female student I passed was my sister."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 20 -- "The female student I passed was my sister." by Ota, Haruyo

    The female student I passed was my sister -- Explanation by the artist: "It was like a road but there was no road. Not a single person could get through. I was worried about getting there before dark, so I walked right by two female students. One had bandages on her head and arms. One arm was in a sling of calico cloth. The other was wearing a uniform drenched with blood, her head wrapped, face covered with blood, hair singed red. She looked like a demon. For some reason, I spoke to her and discovered to my astonishment that she was my sisiter. I pinched my cheek thinking I must be dreaming." -- August 6, 1945, 3:30 - 4:00 p.m. -- 800m from the hypocenter, near Dobashi. The artist was 18 at the time of the bombing, 48 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 18  --  "A line of burned lunchboxes"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 18 -- "A line of burned lunchboxes" by Takeuchi, Isamu

    A line of burned lunchboxes, Art -- Exlpanation by the artist: buriedAfter morning assembly, they were probably doing calisthenics. They seemed to be junior high students. I wonder where the owners of these lunchboxes were, laid out so neatly. Because this drill ground was near the hypocenter, the lost lunchboxes were burned but still retained their shape, which makes my heart ache. Thinking of the kindness and love some mother put into each, for them to become last lunches. . . -- 360 m from the hypocenter, Western Drill Ground, Moto-machi. The artist was 25 at the time of the bombing, 82 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 17  --  "Many names written in charcoal on a wall"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 17 -- "Many names written in charcoal on a wall" by Matsumoro, Kazuo

    Many names written in charcoal on a wall -- Explanation by the artist: "Part of the wall at Takeya Elementary School. The names of missing people were written in charcoal by those looking for them. 'Hisako Nishimura - tell me where your are - Mother' 'Kazuko, come here' 'Toshie Mitsutani is OK' 'Ippei Masuda, Miyoko is OK, going to Mukaihara' 'Father, Mother both OK, come to Hijiyama Gobenden.' " -- 1,280 m from the hypocenter, Takeya Elementary School, Takara-machi. The artist was 32 at the time of the bombing, 61 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Park --  Memorial to children who perished  in the blast, 01
    Hiroshima: Peace Park -- Memorial to children who perished in the blast, 01

    Near the A-Bomb Dome, seen in the background here, is a memorial to children who perished in the blast. A number of middle- and high-school students were working as volunteers in factories or clearing fire lanes in the the city on the morning of the bomb blast.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Park --  Memorial to children who perished  in the blast, 04
    Hiroshima: Peace Park -- Memorial to children who perished in the blast, 04

    Strings of folded paper, origami, cranes left at the memorial by school children. The tradition of folding and leaving paper cranes at several locations in the peace park at Hiroshima derives from the example and life and death of Sadako Sasaki. Exposed as an infant to the radiation of the atomic bomb blast, Sadako appeared to have been unharmed until she reached the age of eleven, when she suddenly was stricken with the leukemia that claimed her life within nine months. In the story now known by school children worldwide, before her death she attempted to fold one thousand paper cranes, believing that her life would be spared if she could complete the task.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Post-war ruins of the German Embassy
    Japan, 1951: Post-war ruins of the German Embassy

    German embassy building rubble across the street from the National Diet Building. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Unloading of whale meat
    Japan, 1951: Unloading of whale meat

    Whale meat, brought in refrigerator ships from the Arctic regions is unloaded to be sold from retail meat shops. --This was the description to accompany this image, as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Immediate effects of blast and heat on physical objects, 01.  Melted bottles.
    Hiroshima: Immediate effects of blast and heat on physical objects, 01. Melted bottles.

    Immediate effects from the heat and from the force of the blast and of the ensuing fires in Hiroshima. The glass bottles in this image were melted and deformed by the heat of the atomic bomb blast and the heat of the resulting fires, which consumed Hiroshima as an immediate after-effect of the initial explosion. The stacks of coins on the left in the image were fused together by the heat. The temperature required to cause these effects may have been in the vicinity of approximately 1500 degrees Fahrenheit and, obviously, the effect of this heat on human victims was unspeakable. These items are on display in the Peace Memorial Museum in Hiroshima.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951: Cityscape as viewed from Tokyo Tower
    Japan, 1951: Cityscape as viewed from Tokyo Tower

    Kyoto and Tokyo scenes, symbolic of modern Japan. 1966 rebuilt city viewed from the Tokyo Tower- electric wires , modern cars, highways, buildings. Japan is the most highly industrialized country of the Orient. She depends on international trade for the means of her national livelihood. --This was the description to accompany this image, as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Cremation of the dead.
    Hiroshima: Cremation of the dead. by Photo by Hajime Miyatake. Courtesy of Asahi Shimbun.

    Because of the summer heat, it was crucial to cremate the bodies of victims quickly, although it was difficult because of the enormous number of bodies. Temporary cremation sites were set up throughout the city to cremate the bodies that were being brought continuously. In this photo we can see the bodies being piled one upon another with firewood to burn the bodies.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Hand digging foundations, post-war reconstruction
    Japan, 1951: Hand digging foundations, post-war reconstruction

    Digging for new foundations to replace buildings destroyed during the war. The picks are brought down with powerful strokes. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Rice cultivation, planting by hand
  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  National Peace Memorial Hall, photographic registry of victims
    Hiroshima: National Peace Memorial Hall, photographic registry of victims

    Approximately 240,000 names of victims who were exposed to the atomic bomb in Hiroshima are written in the Hiroshima Register of Deceased Atomic Bomb Victims. It is stored in the Cenotaph for the A-bomb Victims (Memorial Monument for Hiroshima, City of Peace). -- A room in the National Peace Memorial Hall houses a searchable registry of the names and, when available, photographs of the victims. The photographs of the victims are displayed serially on this wall panel monitor. The photos include persons of all ages and stations in life; the bomb destroyed lives indiscriminately.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Memorial Mound, paper cranes
    Hiroshima: Memorial Mound, paper cranes

    Strings of paper cranes left at the Memorial Mound in the Peace Memorial Park.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima Memoir:   Tamiko Tsunematsu
    Hiroshima Memoir: Tamiko Tsunematsu by Tsunematsu, Tamiko

    Passage from the Memoir of Tamiko Tsunematsu (female) -- “The flames licked closer and closer, but my mother and I were not able to save either of them. [My sister called out,] ‘Mother, Tami-chan, hurry and get away. I will die here.’ Right after she said those words, my sister seemed to lose consciousness. ‘Rei-chan, I’m sorry. Forgive me, forgive me!,’ I sobbed. As I walked away I looked back, calling out ‘Forgive me, forgive me!’ I felt as if I would go mad. Mother and I held hands tightly. Then we looked back at our home neighborhood and put our hands together in prayer. The whole of our neighborhood was up in flames all around.â€

  • Thumbnail for Untitled (opposite side view) [Carved wooden modern sculpture]
    Untitled (opposite side view) [Carved wooden modern sculpture] by Sofu Teshigaraha (1900-1979)

    Carved wood, 55-1/2h x 16w x 22d". The piece is an intriguing abstract sculpture, evoking natural forms. The pattern of negative spaces calls to mind the ribs of an animal. It also preserves the marks of the artist’s chisel, as well as the signs of aging (cracking). The textures invite one to experience its tactile qualities. Several different views of this work are needed to appreciate sculpture by an artist better known for an ikebana school. Sofu is better known as the founder of a major school of ikebana, which continues to be active today. The file for this piece includes an undated, color exhibition catalogue with texts by Soichi Tominaga, Dir. of the National Museum of Western Art in Tokyo, and Yoshiaki TONO, an art critic. The texts are in English and French. This piece is number 23 in the catalogue. Pasted into the catalogue at the back is a listing of exhibitions of Sofu’s work: 1953 Takashimaya, 1954 Sao Paulo Quatrocentenary, 1956 Takashimaya, 1957 Trienalle, Milan, 1958 est. Sogetsu Kaikan Building, 1959 Martha Jackson Gallery, NY Stadler Gallery, Paris, 1960 “Art and Natureâ€, Venice, 1961 Stadler Gallery, Paris, 1962 Bunjin-ga at the Petit Palais, 1963 Takashimaya.

  • Thumbnail for Nezu Shrine in Snow
    Nezu Shrine in Snow by Kawase Hasui

    Color woodblock, 15 1/4 X 10 1/2 inches, ink and color on paper. Shin Hanga print by Kawase Hasui of the early 18th century Nezu Shrine. Captured on a snowy day, Hasui creates a photographic effect showing the entrance in a cropped view. Architectural features are sharply detailed against the white background; the marshy walkway coming in from the right leads the viewer's eye into the print.