Colorado College Logo

  DigitalCC

Use AND (in capitals) to search multiple keywords.
Example: harmonica AND cobos

189 hits

  • Thumbnail for Tamba pottery, view 12., detail of the Ichino kiln
    Tamba pottery, view 12., detail of the Ichino kiln

    Closer view of the side of the Ichino kiln, showing the arched opening, the door, into one of the ware chambers. Piled next to the opening are the brick blocks that will be used to close off the opening for the next firing. Bundles of wood are stored on top of the arch and will be totally dried by the heat of the kiln during the early stages of the firing. Although there appear to be a couple of square kiln shelves to the left of the door in this photo, the Tamba kilns still are stacked largely using the traditional means of loading them, which means the use of saggers and/or the stacking of pots on top of one another, with wads of clay and high-silica ash wash between them, to prevent them from sticking to one another.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Poem of Hope, enlarged text.
  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Chinese Parasol Tree
    Hiroshima: Chinese Parasol Tree

    At the time of the atomic bomb blast in Hiroshima, a Chinese Parasol tree sapling was burned, seared on the side of its trunk that was exposed to the horrendous flash of heat of the blast. But the core of the tree remained alive. Over time, the force of life again asserted itself. The tree grew and the side of the tree facing away from the blast grew around the injured portion, as if covering and protecting it. In May, 1973, the tree was transplanted to the Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, where it continues to grow, an affirmation of hope and life.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  A-bomb Dome 03, Peace Memorial Park.
    Hiroshima: A-bomb Dome 03, Peace Memorial Park.

    View 2. The A-bomb Dome in the Peace Memorial Park, Hiroshima.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Model of the immediate target area after the atomic blast
    Hiroshima: Model of the immediate target area after the atomic blast

    This model from the Peace Memorial Museum presents what remained in the central target area after the explosion of the atomic bomb. It represents the site on the afternoon of August 6, or perhaps on August 7, when the consuming fires had died out. The remains now known as the A-Bomb Dome are in the upper left. Because the force of the blast was almost directly down on that brick building, rather than outward, some of the walls remained standing, although the interior was entirely crushed and collapsed by the blast. Several other buildings in the vicinity also remained standing or partially standing; they were buildings constructed of high quality steel-reinforced concrete. Everything else is gone, either destroyed by the initial force of the blast or consumed by the raging fires that immediately swept the city, leaving essentially nothing by the end of the day.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Model of the target area before the explosion
    Hiroshima: Model of the target area before the explosion

    This model in the Peace Memorial Museum shows the area between and along the Honkawa River and the Motoyasu River. Since the end of the Edo period (1867) it had been the downtown shopping and entertainment district of Hiroshima, as well as an area of historic temples and shrines. -- Because of the threat of air-raids, several streets were being cleared of buildings during the summer of 1945, to create fire lanes. On the morning of August 6, many middle school students lost their lives because they were in this district that morning, working on the demolition of buildings to create the fire lanes. -- At the head of the islnd may be seen the "T" shaped bridge that was the actual target of the atomic bomb dropped by the Enola Gay. On the bank of the river, slightly to the right of that bridge is the copper-roofed building with a dome, the Hiroshima Prefecture Industrial Promotion Hall, that was almost directly beneath the actual point of detonation of the bomb, the hypocenter. The

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Dedication of the Cenotaph, 1952.
    Hiroshima: Dedication of the Cenotaph, 1952. by Photo courtesy of Chugoku Shimbun, the Chugoku newspaper

    On August 6, 1952, seven years after the bombing of Hiroshima, five war orphans unveiled the cenotaph for the victims of the A-bomb blast. It is known as the Memorial Monument for Hiroshima, City of Peace. Approximately 1,000 persons attended the unveiling ceremony. Each year, on August 6, the memorial service is held in front of this monument located in the Peace Memorial Park. In this photo from 1952, one can still see private houses that had been rebuilt after the war in the area that is now the Peace Park.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 17  --  "Many names written in charcoal on a wall"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 17 -- "Many names written in charcoal on a wall" by Matsumoro, Kazuo

    Many names written in charcoal on a wall -- Explanation by the artist: "Part of the wall at Takeya Elementary School. The names of missing people were written in charcoal by those looking for them. 'Hisako Nishimura - tell me where your are - Mother' 'Kazuko, come here' 'Toshie Mitsutani is OK' 'Ippei Masuda, Miyoko is OK, going to Mukaihara' 'Father, Mother both OK, come to Hijiyama Gobenden.' " -- 1,280 m from the hypocenter, Takeya Elementary School, Takara-machi. The artist was 32 at the time of the bombing, 61 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 06  --   " Parents and crying child, wandering aimlessly.
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 06 -- " Parents and crying child, wandering aimlessly. by Abe, Hatsuko

    Parents and crying child wandering aimlessly -- Explanation by Artist: " My husband's skin peeled off because of the burn. I held my babywith a broken arm. Blood covered our heads and faces. Skin from our faces and our arms dangled. Barefoot, clothes torn to shreds. "Don't cry. Don't cry. When your cry, I get sad." "Waahhh! Waahhh! (give me the breast)" " I haven't eaten since morning. My milk has dried up. Poor thing." "Waa, Waa." Artist was 24 at the time of the bombing, 81 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Park --  Memorial to children who perished  in the blast, 04
    Hiroshima: Peace Park -- Memorial to children who perished in the blast, 04

    Strings of folded paper, origami, cranes left at the memorial by school children. The tradition of folding and leaving paper cranes at several locations in the peace park at Hiroshima derives from the example and life and death of Sadako Sasaki. Exposed as an infant to the radiation of the atomic bomb blast, Sadako appeared to have been unharmed until she reached the age of eleven, when she suddenly was stricken with the leukemia that claimed her life within nine months. In the story now known by school children worldwide, before her death she attempted to fold one thousand paper cranes, believing that her life would be spared if she could complete the task.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Atomic Bomb Dome, Hiroshima, photographed in 1950
    Japan, 1951: Atomic Bomb Dome, Hiroshima, photographed in 1950

    Not all is light and color in Japan. Still there linger dark shadows of the war. This is the Hiroshima Chamber of Commerce Building- target of the first atomic bomb ever used in war. This picture taken in 1950 shows leaves coming out on a tree thought to have been killed by the bomb in 1945. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of the images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Street scene, advertising, Charlie Chaplin
    Japan, 1951: Street scene, advertising, Charlie Chaplin

    Only on holidays are the beautiful kimono seen in significant numbers. 'Charlie Chaplin' proves that Japanese businessmen also believe that 'It pays to advertise.' --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  One of many Japanese fishing fleets
    Japan, 1951: One of many Japanese fishing fleets

    Around Japan are the most important fishing grounds in the world where 1,500,000 persons are employed in securing the largest catch of any nation. They average 70 lbs. of fish per capita per year. Fishing is mostly carried on by large companies which finance effective methods and equipment which is very costly. --This was the description to accompany this image, as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Poem of Hope.
    Hiroshima: Poem of Hope.

    In this photo of the ruins of Hiroshima, taken in the autumn, 1945, we can see a plant that had come back to life and blossomed. Superimposed on it is a poem of great hope and affirmation. It is displayed near the exit of the Peace Memorial Museum.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Artisan making tatami mats
    Japan, 1951: Artisan making tatami mats

    Rice straw is used to make rope, mats, and sandals. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima Memoir:   Tamiko Tsunematsu
    Hiroshima Memoir: Tamiko Tsunematsu by Tsunematsu, Tamiko

    Passage from the Memoir of Tamiko Tsunematsu (female) -- “The flames licked closer and closer, but my mother and I were not able to save either of them. [My sister called out,] ‘Mother, Tami-chan, hurry and get away. I will die here.’ Right after she said those words, my sister seemed to lose consciousness. ‘Rei-chan, I’m sorry. Forgive me, forgive me!,’ I sobbed. As I walked away I looked back, calling out ‘Forgive me, forgive me!’ I felt as if I would go mad. Mother and I held hands tightly. Then we looked back at our home neighborhood and put our hands together in prayer. The whole of our neighborhood was up in flames all around.â€

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  National Peace Memorial Hall, photographic registry of victims
    Hiroshima: National Peace Memorial Hall, photographic registry of victims

    Approximately 240,000 names of victims who were exposed to the atomic bomb in Hiroshima are written in the Hiroshima Register of Deceased Atomic Bomb Victims. It is stored in the Cenotaph for the A-bomb Victims (Memorial Monument for Hiroshima, City of Peace). -- A room in the National Peace Memorial Hall houses a searchable registry of the names and, when available, photographs of the victims. The photographs of the victims are displayed serially on this wall panel monitor. The photos include persons of all ages and stations in life; the bomb destroyed lives indiscriminately.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Children orphaned by the A-bomb explosion
    Hiroshima: Children orphaned by the A-bomb explosion

    Children polishing shoes in front of Hiroshima station after the war -- "During the final stages of the war over 20,000 of Hiroshima's children were evacuated in groups to the countryside to protect them from air raids. Theri lives were saved, but many lost their entire families to the A-bomb. There 'A-bomb orphans' were variously estimated to number betweeen 2,000 and 6,500. Residential facilities were set up and attempts were made to care for them, but the sorrow of losing both parents could not be healed."

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Memorial Mound
    Hiroshima: Memorial Mound

    Near the point of the Peace Memorial Park, close to the blast hypocenter, is the Memorial Mound. The many bodies that lay strewn in the area near the hypocenter and the bodies pulled out of the river were brought to this site and cremated. Shortly after the end of the war, a vault and a memorial mound were built at the site. In 1955, a permanent vault and mound were built and unclaimed ashes from other sites throughout the city were brought here. It is estimated that the ashes of nearly 70,000 victims lie in the vault, victims whose ashes were unclaimed because the identity of the victims was unknown or because the entire family had perished and there was nobody to claim the ashes.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Urban street scene in the post-war era
  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Post-war street scene with Japanese-English sign
  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  National Peace Memorial Hall, sign stating the mission of the Memorial
    Hiroshima: National Peace Memorial Hall, sign stating the mission of the Memorial

    We hereby mourn those who perished in the atomic bombing. At the same time, we recall with great sorrow the many lives sacrificed to mistaken national policy. To ensure that no such tragedies are ever repeated, we pledge to convey the truth of these events throughout Japan and around the world, to pass it on to future generations, and to build, as soon as possible, a peaceful world free from nuclear weapons.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Children’s Peace Monument, figure at top of monument
    Hiroshima: Children’s Peace Monument, figure at top of monument

    At the top of the monument, which is nine-meters high, is this bronze statue of a young girl, perhaps a reference to Sadako Sasaki. In her hands, she lifts a golden crane above her head. The crane carries dreams for a peaceful future. -- On the sides of monument are bronze figures of a young boy and another young girl.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima: Monument to Korean Victims and Survivors, detail
    Hiroshima: Monument to Korean Victims and Survivors, detail

    This detail of the base of the monument shows part of the Korean inscription on the column, the tortoise supporting the column, as well as strings of paper cranes and maps of Korea left by visitors to the monument.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima: Monument to Korean Victims and Survivors
    Hiroshima: Monument to Korean Victims and Survivors

    Over-view of the monument erected on the edge of the Peace Park in 1970, by a group of Koreans. It is dedicated to the many Koreans who died or were injured in Hiroshima by the A-bomb explosion.