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  • Thumbnail for Tamba pottery, view 06., Ichino home and workshop
    Tamba pottery, view 06., Ichino home and workshop

    This is the home and workshop of the Ichino family, one of the foremost pottery families in Tamba-Tachikui.

  • Thumbnail for East Asian Ceramics:  Then and Now.  04, Shino-ware Jar by Rosanjin
    East Asian Ceramics: Then and Now. 04, Shino-ware Jar by Rosanjin by Kitaoji Rosanjin

    This Shino-ware jar was created by Rosanjin, a great Japanese ceramic artist of the first half of the 20th century. Rosanjin, a restaurateur by profession, was an "amateur" potter, who bagan making pottery because he could not find ceramic pieces that he felt were what he wanted to use in his restaurant. He often looked back to earlier traditions to find forms, glazes, techniques, and ideas from which to draw in his own modern work. In this piece, obviously, he has referred to the tradition of shino-ware with underglaze iron brush decoration. He has applied them to his own contemporary form, although it is interesting to note the undulations of the rim of the piece and to then look at the rims of many Momoyama and Edo period shino-ware tea ceremony bowls. The brown brushed design on this side of the piece are said to be stylized representations of pine trees; on the other side of the piece are forms suggesting birds. The orangish areas on the surface are areas where the glaze was

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Immediately after the Bombing, photo and statement by Yoshito Matsushige.
    Hiroshima: Immediately after the Bombing, photo and statement by Yoshito Matsushige. by Matsushige, Yoshito.

    This is another of the very rare photographs of the immediate aftermath of the bombing. The photo, taken by Yoshito Matsushige, shows victims huddled at the west end of the Miyuki Bridge, 2,270 meters from the hypocenter, about 11:00 a.m., August 6, 1945. In the book, The Viewfinder Clouded with Tears, Mr. Matsushige writes, "I fought with myself for 30 minutes before I could take the first picture. After taking the first, I grew strangely calm and wanted to get closer. I took about ten steps forward and tried to snap another, but the scenes I saw were so gruesome my viewfinder clouded with tears."

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Cenotaph for the A-bomb Victims.
    Hiroshima: Cenotaph for the A-bomb Victims.

    The Cenotaph is a shrine to the victims of the A-bomb blast. Their names are listed in a registry in a stone crypt in the Cenotaph, which lies in the Peace Memorial Park on the axis between the A-Bomb Dome and the Peace Memorial Museum. The tables in the middle foreground in this image hold sand in which one may place an upright burning stick of incense in memory of those departed; flowers are placed at the front of the Cenotaph daily by visitors. Through the Cenotaph, one may see the Atomic Bomb Dome in the background. Viewed from the side, the Cenotaph is seen to turn upward at its ends, creating a form perfectly reminiscent of the form a haniwa house or the form of an old rural farm house still seen in some areas of Japan.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics:  Covered box by Kawai Hirotsugu.
    Japanese Ceramics: Covered box by Kawai Hirotsugu. by Kawai, Hirotsugu (b. 1919)

    Porcelain box with underglaze cobalt and overglaze enamel decoration. (Gift of William Vredenburg, 1991.102.a-.c )

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  A-bomb Dome 03, Peace Memorial Park.
    Hiroshima: A-bomb Dome 03, Peace Memorial Park.

    View 2. The A-bomb Dome in the Peace Memorial Park, Hiroshima.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Immediate effects of blast and heat on physical objects, 01.  Melted bottles.
    Hiroshima: Immediate effects of blast and heat on physical objects, 01. Melted bottles.

    Immediate effects from the heat and from the force of the blast and of the ensuing fires in Hiroshima. The glass bottles in this image were melted and deformed by the heat of the atomic bomb blast and the heat of the resulting fires, which consumed Hiroshima as an immediate after-effect of the initial explosion. The stacks of coins on the left in the image were fused together by the heat. The temperature required to cause these effects may have been in the vicinity of approximately 1500 degrees Fahrenheit and, obviously, the effect of this heat on human victims was unspeakable. These items are on display in the Peace Memorial Museum in Hiroshima.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Detail, Construction of the International Building in central Tokyo.
    Japan, 1951: Detail, Construction of the International Building in central Tokyo.

    Beginning the International Building in central Tokyo. The steelwork allows some flexibility to accomodate for the earthquake shocks. the weight of the steel structure causes it to sink into the swamp on which Tokyo is built, similar to those of Chicago and Shangai. The sign tells that the building has already sunk 18 of the 50 feet required for the four subtererrean stories. A maximum of 9 stories are permitted above ground. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of the images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Atomic Bomb Dome, Hiroshima, photographed in 1950
    Japan, 1951: Atomic Bomb Dome, Hiroshima, photographed in 1950

    Not all is light and color in Japan. Still there linger dark shadows of the war. This is the Hiroshima Chamber of Commerce Building- target of the first atomic bomb ever used in war. This picture taken in 1950 shows leaves coming out on a tree thought to have been killed by the bomb in 1945. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of the images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Vegetable plots within an urban setting
    Japan, 1951: Vegetable plots within an urban setting

    The dominant landscape in Japan is still rural. More than half of the arable land is given over to rice cultivation, and 90% of the laborers are farmers. But 84% of the land area is mountainous- which means that each acre of tillable land must support 3,400 persons. The comparable figure for China is 1,400 while for the U.S. it is only 270 persons. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of the images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Survivors immediately after the blast.
    Hiroshima: Survivors immediately after the blast. by Matsushige, Yoshito

    Photographs of the immediate after-effects of the A-bomb are very rare. This photo was one of perhaps half a dozen or fewer taken by resident Yoshito Matsushige. It was taken at about 11:00 a.m., on the morning of August 6, at the west end of the Miyuki Bridge, Senda-machi, about 2,270 meters from the hypocenter. It shows survivors of the blast seeking aid for burns and other injuries. The photo has been enlarged to a mural sized image in the Peace Memorial Museum.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Medical care at a rellief station.
    Hiroshima: Medical care at a rellief station. by Photo by Army Marine Headquarters. Courtesy of Keisuke Misonoo.

    The First Elementary School, 2,600 meters from the hypocenter, and other building that survived the blast throughout the city were used as relief stations to provide the very minimal aid that was available to the victims of the blast.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Poem of Hope.
    Hiroshima: Poem of Hope.

    In this photo of the ruins of Hiroshima, taken in the autumn, 1945, we can see a plant that had come back to life and blossomed. Superimposed on it is a poem of great hope and affirmation. It is displayed near the exit of the Peace Memorial Museum.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 14  --  "Injured dying one after the next, people looking for family"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 14 -- "Injured dying one after the next, people looking for family" by Anonymous

    Injured dying one after the next, people looking for familyured d -- Explanation by the Artist: king fMorning, noon and night, the injured died. White medicines applied [to] burns made pores look bright red. Many were carrying huge loads, calling out, searching for parents, siblings, friends. Relief teams called, 'Anyone here from such and such neighborhood?' I think it was about the 8th when three young soldiers saluted and left. After they left, we heard they were suicide troops sent in from Etajima island. -- The artist was 19 at the time of the bombing, 49 at the time he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Harvesting seaweed
    Japan, 1951: Harvesting seaweed

    Seaweed gathered and dried before packaging, is a valuable article of food. It furnishes flavor, iodine and salt. --This was the description to accompany this image, as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 20  --  "The female student I passed was my sister."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 20 -- "The female student I passed was my sister." by Ota, Haruyo

    The female student I passed was my sister -- Explanation by the artist: "It was like a road but there was no road. Not a single person could get through. I was worried about getting there before dark, so I walked right by two female students. One had bandages on her head and arms. One arm was in a sling of calico cloth. The other was wearing a uniform drenched with blood, her head wrapped, face covered with blood, hair singed red. She looked like a demon. For some reason, I spoke to her and discovered to my astonishment that she was my sisiter. I pinched my cheek thinking I must be dreaming." -- August 6, 1945, 3:30 - 4:00 p.m. -- 800m from the hypocenter, near Dobashi. The artist was 18 at the time of the bombing, 48 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 18  --  "A line of burned lunchboxes"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 18 -- "A line of burned lunchboxes" by Takeuchi, Isamu

    A line of burned lunchboxes, Art -- Exlpanation by the artist: buriedAfter morning assembly, they were probably doing calisthenics. They seemed to be junior high students. I wonder where the owners of these lunchboxes were, laid out so neatly. Because this drill ground was near the hypocenter, the lost lunchboxes were burned but still retained their shape, which makes my heart ache. Thinking of the kindness and love some mother put into each, for them to become last lunches. . . -- 360 m from the hypocenter, Western Drill Ground, Moto-machi. The artist was 25 at the time of the bombing, 82 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 10  --  "Mother burned black covering her baby under her chest."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 10 -- "Mother burned black covering her baby under her chest." by Taguchi, Mitsuko

    Mother burned black covering her baby under her chest. -- Explanation by Artist: "She was lying in the middle of the road, where she had died trying to get away carrying her child. Her hair was standing on end and her baby was under her chest, as if still alive. Her eyes were wide open, I still can't forget that shocking sight."The scene depicted ws 1,000 meters from the hypocenter, in front of Hiroshima Central Broadcasting Station, Kaminagarekawa-cho (now Nobori-cho). Artist was 30 at the time of the bombing, 60 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Seller of pots, pans, and other household necessities
    Japan, 1951: Seller of pots, pans, and other household necessities

    Japan, 'the workshop of the Orient,' produces quantities of pans, pails, and kettles of iron and aluminum. Such exports we once sold principally in the Orient, but now they are sent to Africa and Latin America --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Abandoned children of the Occupation
    Japan, 1951: Abandoned children of the Occupation

    The disasters of nature are terrible and those of accidents are distressing, but none surpass the human tragedies of war. Here is a group of children- with Japanese mothers and American GI fathers- whom they have never seen. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Woman and children at neighborhood shop
    Japan, 1951: Woman and children at neighborhood shop

    In winter, warmth in a Japanese home is supplied from charcoal in a beautiful hibachi. On a cold November day this mother carries her son on her back, covered by a heavy kimono which keeps them both warm. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Tokyo office building with vent pipes from heating
    Japan, 1951: Tokyo office building with vent pipes from heating

    'Tokyo Pipe Organ' -1950 version of heating a large office building from which the radiators were taken for scrap metal during the war. --This was the description to accompany this image, as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Unloading of whale meat
    Japan, 1951: Unloading of whale meat

    Whale meat, brought in refrigerator ships from the Arctic regions is unloaded to be sold from retail meat shops. --This was the description to accompany this image, as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Rice cultivation, threshing machine
    Japan, 1951: Rice cultivation, threshing machine by 1992

    Rice farming supports 5 times as many people as a diet of meat and milk like ours, on a given acre of land would. The threshing maching is operated by hydroelectric power. The farmer's wife helps him feed the machine, while the grandmother begins to separate the grain from the chaff. Now, tractors are being used extensively. -- The dominant landscape in Japan is still rural. More than half of the arable land is given over to rice cultivation, and 90% of the laborers are farmers. But 84% of the land area is mountainous--which means that each acre of tillable land must support 3,400 persons. The comparable figure for China is 1,400 while for the U.S. it is only 270 persons. -- SCAP--Supreme Command of Allied Powers helped greatly by reclaiming 750,000 acres of mountainous or swamp land. Also, thanks to an effective Dept. of Agriculture, improved fertilizers have been introduced so that Japanese land yields are among the highest in the world. Also, SCAP sold much land to Japan Japan - Showa 1926 - 1989 1951 Rinden, Arthur O. Business-Agriculture; Daily Life-Family; Daily Life-Food still image Image/jpeg 1200 w x 819 h, 150ppi 1951 Material may be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only, in accordance with Fair Use policies. Acknowledgement to be given to the IDEAS Project, to Earlham College, and to the photographer. Arthur O. Rinden estate retains copyright. Rinden Kanost Collection Earlham College ecasia000541 ecasia_a_000541 Thiedeman, Michael 2000-08-07 2006-08-05 The images in the Rinden Kanost Collection were all taken by Arthur Rinden and conserved by his daughter, Margaret Kanost, and her husband, Richard. The material is presented here through the generosity of Margaret Kanost. -- Please see images ecasia000573 and ecasia000574 for detailed information regarding this set of images and about the collection, as a whole. -- Editorial assistant: Marcus Davis. Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. Please send comments or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address: mikethiedeman@mac.com 2006-08-06 2006-09-01 http://cdm16304.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p139501coll4/id/1210 1210 1211.jpg /p139501coll4/image/1211.jpg Hiroshima: A warning to the future from J. Robert Oppenheimer “ . . . With the end of the Cold War, the danger of nuclear annihilation seemed to pass, but in another ironic twist, the threat of nuclear war and nuclear terrorism is probably more imminent in the twenty-first century than ever before. -- “ In the post-9/11 era, it is worth recalling that at the dawn of the nuclear age, the father of the atomic bomb [ J. Robert Oppenheimer ] warned us that it was a weapon of indiscriminate terror that instantly had made America more vulnerable to wanton attack. When he was asked in a closed Senate hearing in 1946 ‘whether three or four men couldn’t smuggle units of an [ atomic ] bomb into New York and blow up the whole city,’ he responded pointedly, ‘Of course it could be done, and people could destroy New York.’ To the follow-up question of a startled senator, ‘What instrument would you use to detect an atomic bomb hidden somewhere in a city?’ Oppenheimer quipped, ‘A screwdriver [to open each and every crate or suitcase].’ The only defense against nuclear terrorism was the elimination of nuclear weapons. “ United States of America 1946; 2005 Bird, Kai and Sherman, Martin J. Government-Documents; Government-Military; Government-Protest Movements; Media-Print; People-Historical Figures still image Image/jpeg 1200 w x 752 h, 150ppi text source: preface to the book, litaryAmerican Prometheus - The Triumph and Tradedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer,ot;&qu by Kai Bird and Martin J. Sherwin. Alfred A. Knopf, N.Y., 2005; photo: Peace Memorial Museum, Hiroshima May be used only for educational, non-commercial purposes, in accordance with Fair Use Policies. Text credit must be given to authors Kai Bird and Martin J. Sherwin, who retain copyright. Earlham College Asian Cultures Collection Earlham College ecasia000794 ecasia_a_000794 Thiedeman, Michael Image: 2005-11-18; text: 2006-08-10 2006-08-10 2006-08-10 2006-08-27 http://cdm16304.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p139501coll4/id/1215 1215 1216.jpg /p139501coll4/image/1216.jpg Hiroshima: Panoramic photo from October, 1945 This panoramic photograph was taken by Shigeo Hayashi on October 7, 1945. [Note that enlarged details may be viewed by clicking the magnifying tool to the upper left of the image and by using the left-right arrows just to the right of the magnification percentage box.] -- Mr. Hayashi commented, “This panoramic photograph was taken from the rooftop of the Hiroshima Chamber of Commerce and Industry which was then located at the eastern end of the Aioi Bridge. Since it is physically impossible to take this sort of picture from one place, some of the joints between the views are slightly unnatural because I moved to each corner of the roof. I hope that I am the last man to take such a picture and that we will have a world in which no one will ever again take such a picture anywhere on earth.†-- The photograph, photoprinted on ceramic tiles by Kango Kataoka, in mounted on the base of the Hiroshima Monument for the A-bomb Victims, near the edge of the Motoyasu River, not far from the Japan Japan - Showa 1926 - 1989 1945-10-07 Hayashi, Shigeo Government-Monuments ecasia000795; ecasia000796 Atomic bomb--Hiroshima; Atomic bomb--victims Chugoku (region), Hiroshima (prefecture), Hiroshima (inhabited place) 7004499 still image Image/jpeg 2400 w x 386 h, 150ppi 20051116 Material may be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only, in accordance with Fair Use policies. Acknowldgement to be given to the IDEAS Project and the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park. Photographer retains copyright. Earlham College Asian Cultures Collection Earlham College ecasia000797 ecasia_a_000797 Thiedeman, Michael 20051116 20060824 Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. Please send comments or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address: thiedmi@earlham.edu 2006-08-24 2006-08-31 http://cdm16304.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p139501coll4/id/1216 1216 1217.jpg /p139501coll4/image/1217.jpg Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Park -- Hiroshima Monument for the A-bomb Victims The bronze statue atop the Monument for the A-bomb Victims is a highly expressive work, suggesting the soul of a victim going to heaven. Titled “Wind of No Return,†the sculpture was created by Hisashi Akutagawa, a professor at Hijiyama Women’s Junior College. -- The epitaph is a poem written by Junko Kurata, a second generation survivor who was a high school student at the time of the construction of the monument -- “When the sky turned suddenly light, my body began to melt. Friends around the world, join in the cry from Hiroshima!†Japan Japan - Showa 1926 - 1989 1945-08-06; 1982-08 Akutagawa, Hisashi and Jurata, Junko Thiedeman, Michael Government-Monuments ecasia000797 Japanese Hiroshima--Atomic bomb; Atomic bomb victims Chugoku (region), Hiroshima (prefecture), Hiroshima (inhabited place) 7004499 still image Image/jpeg 1200 w x 810 w, 150ppi 2005-11-17 Material may be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only, in accordance with Fair Use policies. Acknowledgement to be given to the IDEAS Project, the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park, and Earlham College. Photographer retains copyright. Earlham College Asian Cultures Collection Earlham College ecasia000795 ecasia_a_000795 Thiedeman, Michael 2005-11-17 2006-08-25 Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. Please send comments or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address: thiedmi@earlham.edu 2006-08-25 2006-08-31 http://cdm16304.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p139501coll4/id/1217 1217 1218.jpg /p139501coll4/image/1218.jpg Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Park -- Hiroshima Monument for the A-bomb Victims This monument was completed on August 5, 1982. It is in the Peace Memorial Park, near the bank of the Motoyasu River. It is located perhaps a quarter of a mile downstream from the A-bomb Dome, the hypocenter of the atomic blast. Buried in the immediate vicinity were ceramic roof tiles that had been partially melted by the heat of the explosion. In 1981, high school students began work on a project to beautify the Motoyasu River and uncovered many of these fragments of fused tile. The students issued a call for the building of a monument at this spot, to further the call for world peace. Inlaid in the surface of the monument are pieces of the fused ceramic tile found in the area by the students. Japan Japan - Showa 1926 - 1989 1945-08-06; 1982-08 Thiedeman, Michael Government-Monuments ecasia000797 Japanese Hiroshima--Atomic bomb; Atomic bomb victims Chugoku (region), Hiroshima (prefecture), Hiroshima (inhabited place) 7004499 still image Image/jpeg 1200 w x 859 h, 150ppi 2005-11-17 Material may be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only, in accordance with Fair Use policies. Acknowledgement to be given to the IDEAS Project, the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park, and Earlham College. Photographer retains copyright. Earlham College Asian Cultures Collection Earlham College ecasia000796 ecasia-a_000796 Thiedeman, Michael 2005-11-17 2006-08-25 Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. Please send comments or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address: thiedmi@earlham.edu 2006-08-25 2006-08-31 http://cdm16304.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p139501coll4/id/1218 1218 1219.jpg /p139501coll4/image/1219.jpg Hiroshima: View of the reborn city today Hiroshima today is a vibrant city, as seen in this image taken at the east end of the Peace Bridge across the Motoyasu river. The Peace Memorial Museum is just several hundred meters away, near the other end of the Peace Bridge, and the A-bomb Dome, near the center of the A-bomb explosion, is perhaps half a mile up the river from the site where this photograph was taken. Japan Japan - Heisei 1989 - present 2005-11-26 Thiedeman, Michael Daily Life; Geography-Cityscapes ecasia000799 Chugoku (region), Hiroshima (prefecture), Hiroshima (inhabited place) 7004499 still image Image/jpeg 1200 w x 798 h, 150ppi 2005-11-26 Material may be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only, in accordance with Fair Use policies. Acknowledgement to be given to the IDEAS Project, the photographer, and Earlham College. Photographer retains copyright. Earlham College Asian Cultures Collection Earlham College ecasia000798 ecasia_a_000798 Thiedeman, Michael 2005-11-26 2006-08-26 Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. Please send comments or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address: thiedmi@earlham.edu 2006-08-26 2006-08-26 http://cdm16304.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p139501coll4/id/1219 1219 1220.jpg /p139501coll4/image/1220.jpg Hiroshima: View of the reborn city today -- Panoramic photo from the Aioi Bridge, November, 2005 This panoramic view is a collage of photographs taken from the observation point on the Aioi Bridge in Hiroshima, November, 2005. The Aioi Bridge spans the Ota River at the point at which the river splits into two channels, the Honkawa River to the west and the Motoyasu River on the east. The bridge, itself, is a “T†shaped structure, with an element that leads off from the main bridge, forming a bridge to the head of the island-delta where the Peace Memorial is located. This “T†was the aiming point for the crew of the Enola Gay on that fateful morning, August 6, 1945. -- Note: you may view detail enlargements of sections of the panoramic image by clicking on the magnification tool to the upper left of the image and scroll across the image by using the left-right arrows just to the right of the magnification percentage box. -- In the center of the panoramic photo, the view is that of looking south from the Aioi Bridge, looking down the middle of the Motoyasu River. The A-bomb Dome is seen on the left bank of the Motoyasu River, several hundred meters downstream from the bridge. To the right in the middle of the panorama is the bridge to the tip of the island where the main body of the Peace Park and the Peace Memorial Museum are located. The tower at the tip of the island is the Peace Clock Tower, which tolls “No More Hiroshimas†each morning at 8:15 a.m. -- This view should be compared with that presented in the panorama from October, 1945, photographed by Shigeo Hayashi, image I.D. ecasia000797. The recovery of Hiroshima in the half century separating the two views seems little short of miraculous and is a testament to the strength and resilience of the human spirit. However, it should remind us, also, of the crucial importance of the the Peace Memorial Park and the Peace Memorial Museum, lest we forget the lessons of the past in the richness of our present. Japan Japan - Heisei 1989 - present 2005-11-17 Thiedeman, Michael Geography-Cityscapes ecasia000797; 000793; 000798 Atomic bomb-Hiroshima Chugoku (region), Hiroshima (prefecture), Hiroshima (inhabited place) 7004499 still image Image/jpeg 4800 w x 620 h, 150ppi 2005-11-17 Material may be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only, in accordance with Fair Use policies. Acknowledgement to be given to the IDEAS Project, the photographer, and Earlham College. Photographer retains copyright. Earlham College Asian Cultures Collection Earlham College ecasia000799 ecasia_a_000799 Thiedeman, Michael 2005-11-17 2006-08-26 Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. Please send comments or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address: thiedmi@earlham.edu 2006-08-26 2006-08-26 http://cdm16304.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p139501coll4/id/1220 1220 1221.jpg /p139501coll4/image/1221.jpg Hiroshima: View of the reborn city today, aerial photograph Aerial view of the city of Hiroshima today, showing the geography of the city, built on a river delta with several river branches that form the islands on which the city is built. The Peace Memorial Park is located at the point where the Ota River diverges to form the Motoyasu River and the Hanogawa River. At that point is the Aioi Bridge, which was the aiming point for the Enola Gay, the B-29 bomber that dropped the atomic bomb on August 6, 1945. As can be seen here, this ground zero was the center of the city. The next image, ecasia000801, is an enlargement of this image, showing the locations of some of the elements of the Peace Memorial Park. -- License restrictions prevent us from duplicating a clear aerial image from Google Earth, but you may wish to visit that site. Japan Japan - Heisei 1989 - present 2005 Environment-Geology; Geography-Aerial Imagery ecasia000801;ecasia000721;ecasia000797;ecasia000799 Japanese Chugoku (region), Hiroshima (prefecture), Hiroshima (inhabited place) 7004499 still image Image/jpeg 1200 w x 708 h, 150ppi 2005-11-17 City guide poster on kiosk in front of the Hiroshima Rail Station Material may be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only, in accordance with Fair Use policies. Acknowledgement to be given to the IDEAS Project and Earlham College. Earlham College Asian Cultures Collection Earlham College ecasia000800 ecasia_a_000800 Thiedeman, Michael 2005-11-17 2006-08-27 Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. Please send comments or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address: thiedmi@earlham.edu 2006-08-27 2006-08-27 http://cdm16304.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p139501coll4/id/1221 1221 1222.jpg /p139501coll4/image/1222.jpg Hiroshima: View of the reborn city today, Aerial photograph, cental city and the Peace Memorial Park Aerial view of the city of Hiroshima today, an enlargement of image ecasia000800. It shows the location of the Peace Memorial Park and some of the landmarks close to the Aioi Bridge, which was the target of the atomic bomb dropped by the Enola Gay on August 6, 1945. To view detail in Google Earth, use coordinates 34 degrees 24 minutes North and 132 degrees 27 minutes East. Japan Japan - Heisei 1989 - present 2005 Geography-Aerial Imagery ecasia000800 Japanese Chugoku (region), Hiroshima (prefecture), Hiroshima (inhabited place) 7004499 still image Image/jpeg 1200 w x 953 h, 150ppi 2005-11-17 City guide poster on kiosk in front of the Hiroshima Rail Station Material may be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only, in accordance with Fair Use policies. Acknowledgement to be given to the IDEAS Project and Earlham College. Earlham College Asian Cultures Collection Earlham College ecasia000801 ecasia_a_000801 Thiedeman, Michael 2005-11-17 2006-08-27 Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. Please send comments or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address: thiedmi@earlham.edu 2006-08-27 2006-08-27 http://cdm16304.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p139501coll4/id/1222 1222 1223.jpg /p139501coll4/image/1223.jpg Ainu robes and jewelry Japan Japan - Heisei 1989 - present Taylor, Nancy Arts-Textiles; Arts-Decorative Arts; Daily Life-Clothing still image image/jpeg 600 w x 800 h May be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only, in accordance with Fair Use policies. Acknowledgement must be given to the IDEAS Project, to Earlham College, and to the photographer. Photographer retains copyright. Earlham College Asian Cultures Collection Earlham College ecasia000802 ecasia_a_000802 Thiedeman, Michael Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. Please send comments or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address thiedmi@earlham.edu 2006-08-29 2006-09-03 http://cdm16304.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p139501coll4/id/1223 1223 1224.jpg /p139501coll4/image/1224.jpg Ainu barkcloth robe A contemporary example of an Ainu robe Japan Japan - Heisei 1989 - present Taylor, Nancy Arts-Textiles; Arts-Decorative Arts; Daily Life-Clothing; Hokkaido (region) still image image/jpeg 600 w x 800 h 2003-07-07 May be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only, in accordance with Fair Use policies. Acknowledgement must be given to the IDEAS Project, to Earlham College, and to the photographer. Photographer retains copyright. Earlham College Asian Cultures Collection Earlham College ecasia000803 ecasia_a_000803 Thiedeman, Michael 2003-07-07 2006-08-29 Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. Please send comments or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address: thiedmi@earlham.edu 2006-08-29 2006-09-03 http://cdm16304.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p139501coll4/id/1224 1224 1225.jpg /p139501coll4/image/1225.jpg Ainu salmon skin coat and other Ainu textiles Salmon skin pieced coat, applique bonet Japan Japan - Heisei 1989 - present Taylor, Nancy Arts-Textiles; Arts-Decorative Arts; Daily Life-Clothing; Hokkaido (region) still image image/jpeg 800 w x 600 h 2003-07-07 May be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only, in accordance with Fair Use policies. Acknowledgement must be given to the IDEAS Project, to Earlham College, and to the photographer. Photographer retains copyright. Earlham College Asian Cultures Collection Earlham College ecasia000804 ecasia_a_000804 Thiedeman, Michael 2003-07-07 2006-08-29 Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. Please send comments or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address: thiedmi@earlham.edu 2006-08-29 2006-08-29 http://cdm16304.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p139501coll4/id/1225 1225 1226.jpg /p139501coll4/image/1226.jpg Ainu robes The outer robes are woven from bark. All are appliqued and embroidered. Japan Japan - Heisei 1989 - present Taylor, Nancy Arts-Textiles; Daily Life-Clothing still image image/jpeg 800 w x 600 h 2003-07-07 Material may be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only, in accordance with Fair Use policies. Acknowledgement to be given to the IDEAS Project, Earlham College, and the photographer. Photographer retains copyright. Earlham College Asian Cultures Collection Earlham College ecasia000805 ecasia_a_000805 Thiedeman, Michael 2003-07-07 2006-08-29 Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. Please send comments or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address: thiedmi@earlham.edu 2006-08-29 2006-09-03 http://cdm16304.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p139501coll4/id/1226 1226 1227.jpg /p139501coll4/image/1227.jpg Ainu weaver 'An Ainu backstrap weaver, working with bark fiber, at the Noribetsu Ainu Museum in Hokkaido.' Japan Japan - Heisei 1989 - present Taylor, Nancy Arts-Textiles; Daily Life-Clothing Hokkaido (region), Hokkaido (prefecture), Hokkaido (island), Date (inhabited place) 1079906 still image image/jpeg 800 w x 600 h 2003-07-07 Material may be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only, in accordance with Fair Use policies. Acknowledgement to be given to the IDEAS Project, Earlham College, and the photographer. Photographer retains copyright. Earlham College Asian Cultures Collection Earlham College ecasia000806 ecasia_a_000806 Thiedeman, Michael 2003-07-07 2006-08-29 Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. Please send comments or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address: thiedmi@earlham.edu 2006-08-29 2006-08-29 http://cdm16304.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p139501coll4/id/1227 1227 1228.jpg /p139501coll4/image/1228.jpg Indigo fabrics 'Indigo dyed fabrics in the Date, Hokkaido indigo center. Designs are formed by shibori (tie dye) and rice paste resist.' Japan Japan - Heisei 1989 - present Taylor, Nancy Arts-Textiles; Daily Life-Clothing Hokkaido (region), Hokkaido (prefecture), Hokkaido (island), Hakodate (inhabited place) 7004843 still image image/jpeg 800 w x 600 h 2003-07-07 Material may be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only, in accordance with Fair Use policies. Acknowledgement to be given to the IDEAS Project, Earlham College, and the photographer. Photographer retains copyright. Earlham College Asian Cultures Collection Earlham College ecasia000807 ecasia_a_000807 Thiedeman, Michael 2003-07-07 2006-08-29 Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. Please send comments or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address: thiedmi@earlham.edu 2006-08-29 2006-08-29 http://cdm16304.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p139501coll4/id/1228 1228 1229.jpg /p139501coll4/image/1229.jpg Daisetsu-zan National Park Japan Japan - Heisei 1989 - present 2003-07-07 Taylor, Nancy Environment-Parks; Geography-Landscapes Hokkaido (region), Hokkaido (prefecture), Hokkaido (island), Daisetsuzan-kokuritsu-koen (national park) 1101484 Still image Image/jpeg 800 w x 600 h 2003-07-07 May be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only, in accordance with Fair Use policies. Acknowledgement to be given to the IDEAS Project, to Earlham College, and to the photographer. Photographer retains copyright. Earlham College Asian Cultures Collection Earlham College ecasia000808 ecasia_a_000808 Thiedeman, Michael 2003-07-07 2006-08-29 Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. Please send comments or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address: thiedmi@earlham.edu 2006-08-29 2006-08-29 http://cdm16304.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p139501coll4/id/1229 1229 1230.jpg /p139501coll4/image/1230.jpg Sea urchins for sale in Hakodate, Hokkaido Japan Japan - Heisei 1989 - present 2003-07-07 Taylor, Nancy Business-Stores; Daily Life-Food Japanese Hokkaido (region), Hokkaido (prefecture), Hokkaido (island), Hakodate (inhabited place) 7004843 Still image Image/jpeg 800 w x 600 h 2003-07-07 May be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only, in accordance with Fair Use policies. Acknowledgement to be given to the IDEAS Project, to Earlham College, and to the photographer. Photographer retains copyright. Earlham College Asian Cultures Collection Earlham College ecasia000809 ecasia_a_000809 Thiedeman, Michael 2003-07-07 2006-08-29 Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. Please send comments or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address: thiedmi@earlham.edu 2006-08-29 2006-08-29 http://cdm16304.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p139501coll4/id/1230 1230 1231.jpg /p139501coll4/image/1231.jpg Market in Hakodate, Hokkaido Japan Japan - Heisei 1989 - present 2003-07-07 Taylor, Nancy Business-Stores; Daily Life-Food Japanese Hokkaido (region), Hokkaido (prefecture), Hokkaido (island), Hakodate (inhabited place) 7004843 Still image Image/jpeg 800 w x 600 h 2003-07-07 May be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only, in accordance with Fair Use policies. Acknowledgement to be given to the IDEAS Project, to Earlham College, and to the photographer. Photographer retains copyright. Earlham College Asian Cultures Collection Earlham College ecasia000810 ecasia_a_000810 Thiedeman, Michael 2003-07-07 2006-08-29 Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. Please send comments or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address: thiedmi@earlham.edu 2006-08-29 2006-08-29 http://cdm16304.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p139501coll4/id/1231 1231 1232.jpg /p139501coll4/image/1232.jpg Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Park, Peace Bell Near the north end of the Peace Memorial Park is the Peace Bell. When struck, it issues forth a deep, resonate sound that permeates the space of the park, in the same way as the bell of a Buddhist temple reverberates through a surrounding neighborhood. It is a sound of peace and one that calls us to contemplation. -- The plaque at the base of the bell states, “We dedicate this bell/ As a symbol of Hiroshima Aspiration/ Let all nuclear arms and wars be gone, and the nations live in true peace!/ May it ring to all corners of the earth to meet the ear of every man, for in it throb and palpitate the hearts of its peace-loving donors./ So may you, too, friends, step forward, and toll this bell for peace! Dedicated September 20th, 1964/ By Hiroshima Higan-No-Kai.†-- Throughout the day, the sound of the bell echoes across the Peace Park, with the bell often being struck by children from the groups of school children who move through the park each day. It is interesting to watch t Japan Japan - Showa 1926 - 1989 Thiedeman, Michael Government-Monuments; People-Children Atomic bomb -- Hiroshima Chugoku (region), Hiroshima (prefecture), Hiroshima (inhabited place) 7004499 still image Image/jpeg 1200 w x 875 h, 150ppi 2005-11-17 Material may be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only, in accordance with Fair Use policies. Acknowledgement to be given to the IDEAS Project, the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park, and Earlham College. Photographer retains copyright. Earlham College Asian Cultures Collection Earlham College ecasia000811 ecasia_a_000811 Thiedeman, Michael 2005-11-17 2006-08-30 Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. Please send comments or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address: thiedmi@earlham.edu 2006-08-30 2006-08-31 http://cdm16304.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p139501coll4/id/1232 1232 1233.jpg /p139501coll4/image/1233.jpg Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Park, Peace Bell Dedication Plaque The plaque in front of the Peace Bell in the Peace Memorial Park, with its invocation in both Japanese and English. Japan Japan - Showa 1926 - 1989 Thiedeman, Michael Government-Monuments Atomic bomb -- Hiroshima Chugoku (region), Hiroshima (prefecture), Hiroshima (inhabited place) 7004499 still image Image/jpeg 1200 w x 682 h, 150ppi 2005-11-17 Material may be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only, in accordance with Fair Use policies. Acknowledgement to be given to the IDEAS Project, the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park, and Earlham College. Photographer retains copyright. Earlham College Asian Cultures Collection Earlham College ecasia000812 ecasia_a_000812 Thiedeman, Michael 2005-11-17 2006-08-30 Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. Please send comments or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address: thiedmi@earlham.edu 2006-08-30 2006-08-31 http://cdm16304.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p139501coll4/id/1233 1233 1234.jpg /p139501coll4/image/1234.jpg An Introduction to the Rinden Kanost Collection NOT POSTED YET. -- This item will be a document outlining the background for all of the images included in the Rinden Kanost Collection. ecasia000573 Rinden Kanost Collection Earlham College ecasia000574 Thiedeman, Michael 2006-09-01 2006-09-01 http://cdm16304.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p139501coll4/id/1237 1237 1238.jpg /p139501coll4/image/1238.jpg Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 23 -- A father carries his transformed son on his bicycle."

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Children exposed to radiation before birth; young A-bomb microcephaly patient with her mother
    Hiroshima: Children exposed to radiation before birth; young A-bomb microcephaly patient with her mother

    Many children who were exposed to the radiation of the A-bomb blast while still in their mother's wombs were born with what has become known as "A-bomb microcephaly." Such children suffered from mental retardation or physical disabilities. They have been cared for by relatives, with independence for them being difficult or impossible. As their care-giving relatives age, assistance for them has become a major issue.