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  • Thumbnail for Tamba pottery, view 07., current work from Ichino kiln
    Tamba pottery, view 07., current work from Ichino kiln

    This group of pieces line the edge of a porch across the front of the Ichino home, with its showroom here at the front of the ground floor. The two pieces on the left are very traditional Tamba pieces with their trailed decoration, which is calligraphic on the second piece, a traditional sake bottle.

  • Thumbnail for Tamba pottery, view 02., pots in a shop window
    Tamba pottery, view 02., pots in a shop window

    A group of pots in a shop window show the strong traditional form of Tamba jars. Traditionally made as storage jars, the thick rim allowed a cord to be tied securely around the neck of the jar, to hold a cloth in place to close the mouth of the jar. These bold, simple forms were the result of a direct vocabulary of form handed down through generations of potters over the centuries. The forms were often left totally unglazed and the decoration of the surface would come from the action of the fire and the depositing of ash on the surface, forming a natural glaze, as is the case on the second jar from the left in this photo. The two jars on the right probably had an ash glaze poured on them before they were placed in the kiln and the contrast of the runny dark green ash glaze against the dark iron red of the unglazed clay surfaces creates a dynamic pattern. The two pieces on the right have lugs ("loops" of clay) on their shoulders; originally such lugs were made to allow a lid to be

  • Thumbnail for Tamba pottery, view 03., communal kiln
    Tamba pottery, view 03., communal kiln

    It was common in traditional pottery villages for there to be a large communal kiln which might be fired several times a year, with each workshop in the village filling several chambers with their production. This slide and the next (ecasia000324) show the very long communal tube kiln at Tamba-Tachikui. In this slide western potters may be particularly interested in the stacked wood for the next firing, noting how finely it is split and the uniformity of the length of the wood and the careful sizing of the bundles.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese ceramics: Sake bottle by Fujiwara Yu, modern Bizen potter.
    Japanese ceramics: Sake bottle by Fujiwara Yu, modern Bizen potter. by Fujiwara Yu (1932-2001)

    Sake bottle by Fujiwara Yu (1932-2001), a modern potter in Okayama, Bizen. The piece is perhaps 6 inches tall, made of unglazed stoneware. In the lower right, we see a suggestion of uncovered clay, the dense dark iron red that characterizes much Bizen ware. The rest of piece is heavily covered with deposits of ash from the firing and the crustiness of the surface suggests that perhaps the piece was in a part of the kiln where it was completely buried in charcoal during the firing. On loan from an anonymous collector, R2002.51.1

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Ceremony at the Cenotaph, August 6, 1952.
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Ceremony at the Cenotaph, August 6, 1952.

    Each year on the anniversary of the A-bomb explosion, a memorial ceremony is held in front of the cenotaph. The stone crypt in the cenotaph is opened each year and the names of persons who have died in the previous year from bomb related illnesses are added the the register of names kept in the crypt. This photo shows family members crowding around the crypt, hands clasped in prayer, on August 6, 1952. The annual ceremony continues to this day. It is estimated that approximately 340,000 persons were exposed to the A-bomb blast on August 6, 1945. By the end of December, 1945, 140,000 persons had died, either from the blast or from radiation illness. On August 6, 2004, the number of names of victims enshrined in the Cenotaph was 237,062, having swollen to that number over time because of the slow development of some forms of radiation caused illnesses, such as some forms of cancer. (This photograph, now in the Peace Memorial Museum, was provided courtesy of the Chugoku Shimbun ne

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Pocket watch stopped at the moment of the blast
    Hiroshima: Pocket watch stopped at the moment of the blast

    This watch is on display in the Peace Memorial Museum at Hiroshima. It is one of a number of objects that speak silently and powerfully of the tragedy of August 6, 1945. The watch stopped at the instant of the explosion, 8:15 a.m. The watch belonged to Mr. Kengo Nikawa, who was exposed to the bomb on his way to assigned work on a demolition site in the center of the city. He was 1640 meters away from the hypocenter -- the point of ground zero -- at the time of the explosion and suffered severe burns. He died on August 22. (Donated by Kazuo Nikawa.)

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics:  Covered box by Kawai Hirotsugu.
    Japanese Ceramics: Covered box by Kawai Hirotsugu. by Kawai, Hirotsugu (b. 1919)

    Porcelain box with underglaze cobalt and overglaze enamel decoration. (Gift of William Vredenburg, 1991.102.a-.c )

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  A-bomb Dome 02.  Plaque of dedication.
    Hiroshima: A-bomb Dome 02. Plaque of dedication.

    Hiroshima: A-bomb Dome. Plaque at entrance to site of the A-bomb Dome in the Peace Memorial Park.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 20  --  "The female student I passed was my sister."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 20 -- "The female student I passed was my sister." by Ota, Haruyo

    The female student I passed was my sister -- Explanation by the artist: "It was like a road but there was no road. Not a single person could get through. I was worried about getting there before dark, so I walked right by two female students. One had bandages on her head and arms. One arm was in a sling of calico cloth. The other was wearing a uniform drenched with blood, her head wrapped, face covered with blood, hair singed red. She looked like a demon. For some reason, I spoke to her and discovered to my astonishment that she was my sisiter. I pinched my cheek thinking I must be dreaming." -- August 6, 1945, 3:30 - 4:00 p.m. -- 800m from the hypocenter, near Dobashi. The artist was 18 at the time of the bombing, 48 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 07  --   "Mother and child begging for water."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 07 -- "Mother and child begging for water." by Tasaka, Hajime

    Mother and child begging for watery Surv -- Explanation by the Artist: eggingIn front of Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital, a badly burned mother, a child too weak to stand. Big burn blisters cover their bodies, their hair is singed. 'Water, water please.' the mother weakly begs of passers-by. -- The scene depicted was 1,500 meters from the hypocenter, in front of Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital, Senda-machi 1-chome. The artist was 15 at the time of the bombing, 45 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 03  --  "I couldn't get my grandmother out"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 03 -- "I couldn't get my grandmother out" by Yamada, Ichiro

    I couldn't get my grandmother out -- Explanation by Artist: "I am running away from my grandmother without answering her. I had only a second to get out. There was nothing I could do. I wish at least I has answered her. It's so sad I never wanted to tell anyone this story. There is no way to atone for this sin." Artist was 18 at the time of the bombing, 75 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Rice cultivation, terraced farming methods
    Japan, 1951: Rice cultivation, terraced farming methods

    The dominant landscape in Japan is still rural. More than half of the arable land is given over to rice cultivation, and 90% of the laborers are farmers. But 84% of the land area is mountainous- which means that each acre of tillable land must support 3,400 persons. The comparable figure for China is 1,400 while for the U.S. it is only 270 persons. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of the images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951: Cityscape as viewed from Tokyo Tower
    Japan, 1951: Cityscape as viewed from Tokyo Tower

    Kyoto and Tokyo scenes, symbolic of modern Japan. 1966 rebuilt city viewed from the Tokyo Tower- electric wires , modern cars, highways, buildings. Japan is the most highly industrialized country of the Orient. She depends on international trade for the means of her national livelihood. --This was the description to accompany this image, as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Cremation of the dead.
    Hiroshima: Cremation of the dead. by Photo by Hajime Miyatake. Courtesy of Asahi Shimbun.

    Because of the summer heat, it was crucial to cremate the bodies of victims quickly, although it was difficult because of the enormous number of bodies. Temporary cremation sites were set up throughout the city to cremate the bodies that were being brought continuously. In this photo we can see the bodies being piled one upon another with firewood to burn the bodies.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Bicycles frequently used for transportation
    Japan, 1951: Bicycles frequently used for transportation

    In the early period after the war, bicycle were perhaps the most common form of transportation used in Japan, even for the transporting of goods, as seen in this image. [note: description written by IDEAS editor. The photographer, Arthur O. Rinden, did not provide a description for this image.]

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 19  --  "Mother and me joyfully reuniting in the ruins"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 19 -- "Mother and me joyfully reuniting in the ruins" by Furui, Natsuko

    Mother and me joyfully reuniting in the ruins -- Explanation by the artist: "Looking for my mother, I searched among the crowds of people trudging out of the city. Then, ahead of me I noticed my mother walking my way in her underwear and with blood on her shoulder. 'Mother!!' We held each other and cried by the side of the road. My mother had been trapped under the house, unable to get out, but neighbors freed her. It was a miracle. If we hadn't met then, I would have spent the whole night wandering through the rubble and smoke looking for her." -- The artist was 22 at the time of the bombing, 78 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  National Peace Memorial Hall, photographic registry of victims
    Hiroshima: National Peace Memorial Hall, photographic registry of victims

    Approximately 240,000 names of victims who were exposed to the atomic bomb in Hiroshima are written in the Hiroshima Register of Deceased Atomic Bomb Victims. It is stored in the Cenotaph for the A-bomb Victims (Memorial Monument for Hiroshima, City of Peace). -- A room in the National Peace Memorial Hall houses a searchable registry of the names and, when available, photographs of the victims. The photographs of the victims are displayed serially on this wall panel monitor. The photos include persons of all ages and stations in life; the bomb destroyed lives indiscriminately.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Abandoned children of the Occupation
    Japan, 1951: Abandoned children of the Occupation

    The disasters of nature are terrible and those of accidents are distressing, but none surpass the human tragedies of war. Here is a group of children- with Japanese mothers and American GI fathers- whom they have never seen. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Woman and children at neighborhood shop
    Japan, 1951: Woman and children at neighborhood shop

    In winter, warmth in a Japanese home is supplied from charcoal in a beautiful hibachi. On a cold November day this mother carries her son on her back, covered by a heavy kimono which keeps them both warm. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Local fish vendor
    Japan, 1951: Local fish vendor

    Women daily buy fresh fish. Products of the sea are the chief source of protein in the Japanese diet. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Giant radishes, daikan, being processed
    Japan, 1951: Giant radishes, daikan, being processed

    Giant radishes, processed like saurkraut, give flavor and vitamins to a meal of rice. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima Memoir:  Yasuko Imai
    Hiroshima Memoir: Yasuko Imai by Imai, Yasuko

    Passage from the Memoir of Yasuko Imai (female) “The morning sun shone into the reception room, lighting up a corner where a young man lay facing the wall. He turned his eyes – which probably were losing vision – toward me and mustered his strength. ‘Nurse,’ he called, and I stopped. He said, ‘I got here before all these other people, can’t the doctor see me yet?’ I said, ‘I’m sorry for the delay. I’ll get the doctor to see you right away. You must not give up.’ He said, ‘Excuse me, but please give me water.’ He died when he drank a sip of water. I picked up the cup with trembling hands. I could no longer control my feelings. Tears flowed onto my monpe work trousers. How he must have wanted to call out, ‘Mother!’â€

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  National Peace Memorial Hall, sign telling facts about the power of the explosion
    Hiroshima: National Peace Memorial Hall, sign telling facts about the power of the explosion

    The atomic bomb dropped at 8:15 a.m., August 6, 1945, exploded at an altitude of approximately 580 meters over the city of Hiroshima. It emitted heat rays, blast, and radiation. In the vicinity of the hypocenter, heat from the bomb raised surface temperatures to 3,000 to 4,000 degrees C. and generated a blast that bkew 440 meters per second (aoubt 984 miles per hour). Simultaneously, an enormous amount of radiation was emitted. These three forms of energy instantly destroyed the entire city, indiscriminatey taking many precious lives.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  National Peace Memorial Hall, sign, Hall of Rememberance
    Hiroshima: National Peace Memorial Hall, sign, Hall of Rememberance

    “The Hall of Rememberance - The Hall of Remembrance is provided for recollection of the victims, prayer for the peaceful repose of their souls, and contemplation of peace.†-- The Hiroshima National Peace Memorial Hall for the Atomic Bomb Victims, and a similar monument in Nagasaki, were founded by the Japanese national government recently. The Hall in Hiroshima was founded in 2002, and is housed in a stunning architectural achievement designed by Kenzo Tange. -- The center contains several elements, including the Hall of Rememberance, a staggering exhibition of the names and photographs of the victims of the explosion, and a library devoted to collecting and preserving memoirs of the victims.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  National Peace Memorial Hall, sign stating the mission of the Memorial
    Hiroshima: National Peace Memorial Hall, sign stating the mission of the Memorial

    We hereby mourn those who perished in the atomic bombing. At the same time, we recall with great sorrow the many lives sacrificed to mistaken national policy. To ensure that no such tragedies are ever repeated, we pledge to convey the truth of these events throughout Japan and around the world, to pass it on to future generations, and to build, as soon as possible, a peaceful world free from nuclear weapons.