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  • Thumbnail for Tamba pottery, view 08., wheel in the Ichino workshop
    Tamba pottery, view 08., wheel in the Ichino workshop

    Potter's wheel in the Ichino workshop at Tamba-Tachikui. This is a "Korean-style" wheel, which is operated by kicking or, usually, with a pawing action of the left foot, rather than with the wheel head stick that is customary in most traditional Japanese potteries. The "fly-wheel" is relatively small and is made of wood, so it has little weight and carries limited momentum, meaning that the wheel must be "kicked" almost constantly and that the rotation speed is slower than would be the case on a western, European-style kick wheel. One other point of interest is the fact that the Korean wheel is kicked counter-clockwise, the same as a potter would work in the west, while Japanese style wheels are rotated clockwise. The direction of rotation of a potter's wheel often will provide a clue as to whether the potter is working from a tradition that is purely Japanese or from a tradition that is influenced by the Korean potters who were brought to Japan by Hideyoshi after his Korean campai

  • Thumbnail for Tamba pottery, view 04., communal kiln
    Tamba pottery, view 04., communal kiln

    Again, this is a photo of the long communal kiln at Tamba-Tachikui. This is the lower portion of the kiln, which stretches on up the hill. The larger pieces of wood stacked on the left here will be used at the beginning of the firing of the kiln, because the large pieces burn slowly, allowing a slow heat rise in the early stages of firing to dry out pots in the kiln. This side of the kiln shows stoke holes for fuel; the doors into the chambers are on the other side of the kiln. It is a tube kiln, with the axis of the arch running up the length of the kiln. The tube is segmented into chambers by walls that cut across the kiln -- essentially, like the structure of a piece of bamboo, and this style of kiln is sometimes called a "split bamboo kiln." In a smaller version, the same structure can be seen clearly in the photos of the Ichino workshop kiln, images ecasia000334 and 335.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Sadako Sasaki's Paper Cranes.
    Hiroshima: Sadako Sasaki's Paper Cranes.

    These origami paper cranes were among those distributed at her funeral. In a story now known worldwide by millions of school children, Sadako Sasaki was exposed to the atomic bomb as an infant of two years age. She appeared to have escaped harm from the exposure, until ten years later, when, in her sixth year in elementary school, she suddenly became ill with leukemia. She was hospitalized and fought for her life for eight months, before succumbing to the leukemia. During her illness, she continually folded paper cranes, believing that they would help her to recover, and the paper cranes have come to be a symbol of both tragedy and hope. Sadako's death gave birth to a movement to erect a monument in the Peace Park to all of the children who perished in the A-bomb explosion.

  • Thumbnail for Nagasaki, Atomic Bomb Museum:  Clock stopped at 11:02
    Nagasaki, Atomic Bomb Museum: Clock stopped at 11:02

    This clock, now in the Atomic Bomb Museum in Nagasaki, stopped at the instant of the atomic bomb blast, 11:02 am, August 9, 1945.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Immediately after the Bombing, photo and statement by Yoshito Matsushige.
    Hiroshima: Immediately after the Bombing, photo and statement by Yoshito Matsushige. by Matsushige, Yoshito.

    This is another of the very rare photographs of the immediate aftermath of the bombing. The photo, taken by Yoshito Matsushige, shows victims huddled at the west end of the Miyuki Bridge, 2,270 meters from the hypocenter, about 11:00 a.m., August 6, 1945. In the book, The Viewfinder Clouded with Tears, Mr. Matsushige writes, "I fought with myself for 30 minutes before I could take the first picture. After taking the first, I grew strangely calm and wanted to get closer. I took about ten steps forward and tried to snap another, but the scenes I saw were so gruesome my viewfinder clouded with tears."

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Poem of Hope.
    Hiroshima: Poem of Hope.

    In this photo of the ruins of Hiroshima, taken in the autumn, 1945, we can see a plant that had come back to life and blossomed. Superimposed on it is a poem of great hope and affirmation. It is displayed near the exit of the Peace Memorial Museum.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Black Rain.
    Hiroshima: Black Rain.

    This is a section of a white wall from a house that was 3,700 meters from the hypocenter. The roof of the house had been set askew by the force of the atomic blast, allowing the black rain that fell following the blast to run down the white plaster wall, staining it. Analysis of the stains indicated that the black rain contained radioactive fallout from the atomic bomb blast. This section of wall was donated by Akijiro Yashima, and it is now displayed in the Peace Memorial Museum, Hiroshima.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Cremation of the dead.
    Hiroshima: Cremation of the dead. by Photo by Hajime Miyatake. Courtesy of Asahi Shimbun.

    Because of the summer heat, it was crucial to cremate the bodies of victims quickly, although it was difficult because of the enormous number of bodies. Temporary cremation sites were set up throughout the city to cremate the bodies that were being brought continuously. In this photo we can see the bodies being piled one upon another with firewood to burn the bodies.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  A-bomb Dome 03, Peace Memorial Park.
    Hiroshima: A-bomb Dome 03, Peace Memorial Park.

    View 2. The A-bomb Dome in the Peace Memorial Park, Hiroshima.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 20  --  "The female student I passed was my sister."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 20 -- "The female student I passed was my sister." by Ota, Haruyo

    The female student I passed was my sister -- Explanation by the artist: "It was like a road but there was no road. Not a single person could get through. I was worried about getting there before dark, so I walked right by two female students. One had bandages on her head and arms. One arm was in a sling of calico cloth. The other was wearing a uniform drenched with blood, her head wrapped, face covered with blood, hair singed red. She looked like a demon. For some reason, I spoke to her and discovered to my astonishment that she was my sisiter. I pinched my cheek thinking I must be dreaming." -- August 6, 1945, 3:30 - 4:00 p.m. -- 800m from the hypocenter, near Dobashi. The artist was 18 at the time of the bombing, 48 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 10  --  "Mother burned black covering her baby under her chest."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 10 -- "Mother burned black covering her baby under her chest." by Taguchi, Mitsuko

    Mother burned black covering her baby under her chest. -- Explanation by Artist: "She was lying in the middle of the road, where she had died trying to get away carrying her child. Her hair was standing on end and her baby was under her chest, as if still alive. Her eyes were wide open, I still can't forget that shocking sight."The scene depicted ws 1,000 meters from the hypocenter, in front of Hiroshima Central Broadcasting Station, Kaminagarekawa-cho (now Nobori-cho). Artist was 30 at the time of the bombing, 60 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 06  --   " Parents and crying child, wandering aimlessly.
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 06 -- " Parents and crying child, wandering aimlessly. by Abe, Hatsuko

    Parents and crying child wandering aimlessly -- Explanation by Artist: " My husband's skin peeled off because of the burn. I held my babywith a broken arm. Blood covered our heads and faces. Skin from our faces and our arms dangled. Barefoot, clothes torn to shreds. "Don't cry. Don't cry. When your cry, I get sad." "Waahhh! Waahhh! (give me the breast)" " I haven't eaten since morning. My milk has dried up. Poor thing." "Waa, Waa." Artist was 24 at the time of the bombing, 81 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Vegetable plots within an urban setting
    Japan, 1951: Vegetable plots within an urban setting

    The dominant landscape in Japan is still rural. More than half of the arable land is given over to rice cultivation, and 90% of the laborers are farmers. But 84% of the land area is mountainous- which means that each acre of tillable land must support 3,400 persons. The comparable figure for China is 1,400 while for the U.S. it is only 270 persons. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of the images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Street scene, advertising, Charlie Chaplin
    Japan, 1951: Street scene, advertising, Charlie Chaplin

    Only on holidays are the beautiful kimono seen in significant numbers. 'Charlie Chaplin' proves that Japanese businessmen also believe that 'It pays to advertise.' --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Itinerant rice processor puffing rice
    Japan, 1951: Itinerant rice processor puffing rice

    We eat four times as much protein as the average Japanese. Puffed rice made on the spot by an itinerant processor. He puffs the rice supplied to him. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Artisan making tatami mats
    Japan, 1951: Artisan making tatami mats

    Rice straw is used to make rope, mats, and sandals. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Despair and homelessness in the post-war period
  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Post-war street scene with Japanese-English sign
  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Transporting goods by horse and cart
  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Fisherman tending his ropes and nets
  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Fish or squid being dried in the sun
  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  National Peace Memorial Hall, sign, Hall of Rememberance
    Hiroshima: National Peace Memorial Hall, sign, Hall of Rememberance

    “The Hall of Rememberance - The Hall of Remembrance is provided for recollection of the victims, prayer for the peaceful repose of their souls, and contemplation of peace.†-- The Hiroshima National Peace Memorial Hall for the Atomic Bomb Victims, and a similar monument in Nagasaki, were founded by the Japanese national government recently. The Hall in Hiroshima was founded in 2002, and is housed in a stunning architectural achievement designed by Kenzo Tange. -- The center contains several elements, including the Hall of Rememberance, a staggering exhibition of the names and photographs of the victims of the explosion, and a library devoted to collecting and preserving memoirs of the victims.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  National Peace Memorial Hall, sign stating the mission of the Memorial
    Hiroshima: National Peace Memorial Hall, sign stating the mission of the Memorial

    We hereby mourn those who perished in the atomic bombing. At the same time, we recall with great sorrow the many lives sacrificed to mistaken national policy. To ensure that no such tragedies are ever repeated, we pledge to convey the truth of these events throughout Japan and around the world, to pass it on to future generations, and to build, as soon as possible, a peaceful world free from nuclear weapons.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Children’s Peace Monument, figure at top of monument
    Hiroshima: Children’s Peace Monument, figure at top of monument

    At the top of the monument, which is nine-meters high, is this bronze statue of a young girl, perhaps a reference to Sadako Sasaki. In her hands, she lifts a golden crane above her head. The crane carries dreams for a peaceful future. -- On the sides of monument are bronze figures of a young boy and another young girl.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima: Monument to Korean Victims and Survivors
    Hiroshima: Monument to Korean Victims and Survivors

    Over-view of the monument erected on the edge of the Peace Park in 1970, by a group of Koreans. It is dedicated to the many Koreans who died or were injured in Hiroshima by the A-bomb explosion.