Colorado College Logo

  DigitalCC

Use AND (in capitals) to search multiple keywords.
Example: harmonica AND cobos

89 hits

  • Thumbnail for Meiji Shrine
    Meiji Shrine

    The Meiji Shring is a controversial shrine for many. It is where all of the war dead are entombed, including those who were executed at the end of WWII as war criminals.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze vessel
    Bronze vessel

    In ancient Japan (prior to the Meiji era, 1868-1912), metalwork was solely for swords and Buddhist statues. During the Meiji era, a decree abolishing sword-wearing and the restoration of Shintoism, the original religion of Japan, as the national religion caused the making of metalwork to shift to objects for export and home consumption; the functions of objects and subject of decoration tended to be secular. This vase, designed with a style of Chinese bronze vessel, bears 8 different scenes on the entire body. There are four large panels, with subjects ranging from figurative to seascapes, on the main body of the vessel, and four small horizontal scenes, landscapes and seascapes are the subjects (possibly a display of the four seasons), on the bottom. The designs are done in relief. The borders of the panels are also ornamented with plant patterns, chrysanthemums and gingko tree leaves in particular common Japanese floral motif. A great deal of artistic appeal and distinctive styles are the trademark of Meiji metalwork.

  • Thumbnail for Family photo from Photo Album of Osaka and Kobe with Gold Lacquer Decorated Cover
    Family photo from Photo Album of Osaka and Kobe with Gold Lacquer Decorated Cover

    H: 10.75", W: 14", D: 2.25". Exterior has relief design of geese and flora with stream on front; ivory and mother-of-pearl inlay; back decorated with insects and plants in gold leather spine; hand tinted photographs of places, mainly in Osaka and Kobe, Japan. Inside inscription reads: "Presented to N.W. Utley and Wife by Rev. C.B. Moseley; Aug 9, 1890, Kobe, Japan".

  • Thumbnail for Japanese double gourd shape miniature vase with design of figures in courtly garb lined up for a festival procession (side 1)
    Japanese double gourd shape miniature vase with design of figures in courtly garb lined up for a festival procession (side 1)

    Height: 12 cm. This is a very fine quality piece of Satsuma-style ware made for export to the West in the late 19th century, a time when Japan was avidly promoting production of such wares to expand their economy internationally. The piece does not have the Satsuma mark, and hence should not be defined as "Satsuma ware" proper, but was made at a high quality kiln that imitated this popular export ware product. Probably from a kiln in Kyoto, Osaka, or Tokyo.

  • Thumbnail for 36 Immortal Beauties
    36 Immortal Beauties by Toshikata Mizuno (1866-1908)

    Second of two woodblock prints (with 2005.017). three figures. Woodblock print; image: 12 7/8†x 8 5/8†(32.7 cm x 22 cm), sheet: 13†x 8 3/4†(33.2 cm x 22.2 cm).

  • Thumbnail for Jidai Kagami (Mirror of the Ages)
    Jidai Kagami (Mirror of the Ages) by Chikanobu, Toyohara (1837-1912)

    Sixrth set of two images of women from bound accordion-fold album of 30 woodblock prints with colophon. One half of full series of 50 prints depicting Japanese women of different historical periods highlighting their hairstyles and modes of dress.

  • Thumbnail for Main Building at Meiji Shrine.
    Main Building at Meiji Shrine.

    The main building at the Meiji Shrine on a sunny day.

  • Thumbnail for Ceramic vase (handle detail)
    Ceramic vase (handle detail)

    This is an example of Japanese exported ceramics called “Satsuma ware,†which is characterized by eggshell-colored, clay bodies with finely crackled transparent glazes and painted decoration in gold and other warm tones. After the 1873 Vienna world fair, Satsuma ware became popular and spread to different cities in Japan. However, Satsuma wares were largely produced in Kyoto, Tokyo, and Yokohama. The motifs, which somehow function as a display for different kinds of ceramics/cups/plate, attempted to impress the viewers (foreigners) with the wealth of the discoveries and purchases.

  • Thumbnail for Ceramic vase
    Ceramic vase

    This is an example of Japanese exported ceramics called “Satsuma ware,†which is characterized by eggshell-colored, clay bodies with finely crackled transparent glazes and painted decoration in gold and other warm tones. After the 1873 Vienna world fair, Satsuma ware became popular and spread to different cities in Japan. However, Satsuma wares were largely produced in Kyoto, Tokyo, and Yokohama. The motifs, which somehow function as a display for different kinds of ceramics/cups/plate, attempted to impress the viewers (foreigners) with the wealth of the discoveries and purchases.

  • Thumbnail for Ceramic vase (base pattern detail)
    Ceramic vase (base pattern detail)

    This is an example of Japanese exported ceramics called “Satsuma ware,†which is characterized by eggshell-colored, clay bodies with finely crackled transparent glazes and painted decoration in gold and other warm tones. After the 1873 Vienna world fair, Satsuma ware became popular and spread to different cities in Japan. However, Satsuma wares were largely produced in Kyoto, Tokyo, and Yokohama. The motifs, which somehow function as a display for different kinds of ceramics/cups/plate, attempted to impress the viewers (foreigners) with the wealth of the discoveries and purchases.

  • Thumbnail for Sumo Wrestler Defeating a Westerner
    Sumo Wrestler Defeating a Westerner by Ipposai YOSHIFUJI (1828-87)

    Image of Sumo wrestler successfully tossing a westerner while man and woman looking on. Japanese characters are written on the top of the print and the lower right side. One of a series of prints that appeared during the time between the arrival of Commodore Matthew Perry in 1853, and the actual beginning of the Meiji Era (1868-1912).

  • Thumbnail for Jidai Kagami (Mirror of the Ages)
    Jidai Kagami (Mirror of the Ages) by Chikanobu, Toyohara (1837-1912)

    Third set of images of women from bound accordion-fold album of 30 woodblock prints with colophon. One half of full series of 50 prints depicting Japanese women of different historical periods highlighting their hairstyles and modes of dress.

  • Thumbnail for Jidai Kagami (Mirror of the Ages)
    Jidai Kagami (Mirror of the Ages) by Chikanobu, Toyohara (1837-1912)

    Second two images of women from bound accordion-fold album of 30 woodblock prints with colophon. One half of full series of 50 prints depicting Japanese women of different historical periods highlighting their hairstyles and modes of dress.

  • Thumbnail for Jidai Kagami (Mirror of the Ages) - colophon
    Jidai Kagami (Mirror of the Ages) - colophon by Chikanobu, Toyohara (1837-1912)

    Bound accordion-fold album of 30 woodblock prints with colophon. One half of full series of 50 prints depicting Japanese women of different historical periods highlighting their hairstyles and modes of dress. Color woodblock print; 9 1/2 x 14 1/2".

  • Thumbnail for Jidai Kagami (Mirror of the Ages)
    Jidai Kagami (Mirror of the Ages) by Chikanobu, Toyohara (1837-1912)

    Eighth set of two images of women from bound accordion-fold album of 30 woodblock prints with colophon. One half of full series of 50 prints depicting Japanese women of different historical periods highlighting their hairstyles and modes of dress.

  • Thumbnail for Jidai Kagami (Mirror of the Ages)
    Jidai Kagami (Mirror of the Ages) by Chikanobu, Toyohara (1837-1912)

    Thirteenth set of two images of women from bound accordion-fold album of 30 woodblock prints with colophon. One half of full series of 50 prints depicting Japanese women of different historical periods highlighting their hairstyles and modes of dress.

  • Thumbnail for Jidai Kagami (Mirror of the Ages)
    Jidai Kagami (Mirror of the Ages) by Chikanobu, Toyohara (1837-1912)

    Fourth set of two images of women from bound accordion-fold album of 30 woodblock prints with colophon. One half of full series of 50 prints depicting Japanese women of different historical periods highlighting their hairstyles and modes of dress.

  • Thumbnail for Jidai Kagami (Mirror of the Ages)
    Jidai Kagami (Mirror of the Ages) by Chikanobu, Toyohara (1837-1912)

    First two images of women from bound accordion-fold album of 30 woodblock prints with colophon. One half of full series of 50 prints depicting Japanese women of different historical periods highlighting their hairstyles and modes of dress.

  • Thumbnail for Upstairs balcony of theater building with lanterns and banners bearing actors crests in background
    Upstairs balcony of theater building with lanterns and banners bearing actors crests in background by Ginko Adachi (1874-1895)

    Upstairs scene of couple relaxing in theater building. Color woodblock print;9†x 14â€.

  • Thumbnail for 36 Immortal Beauties
    36 Immortal Beauties by Toshikata Mizuno (1866-1908)

    One of two woodblock prints (with 2005.018). One female figure. Image: 12 3/4†x 8 5/8†(32.5 cm x 22 cm), sheet: 13†x 9†(33 cm x 22.9 cm).

  • Thumbnail for Album of Landscape Paintings in the Shape of Folding Fans
  • Thumbnail for Household Shrine to Benzaiten
    Household Shrine to Benzaiten by Anonymous

    Dedicated to the Goddess of Wisdom and Fertility. Lacquered wood.

  • Thumbnail for Eikan-do shrine, building
    Eikan-do shrine, building

    A building at Eikan-Do shrine in Kyoto stands against a cloudy sky.

  • Thumbnail for Fort Goryokaku
    Fort Goryokaku

    Aerial photo of Hakodate on the northern island of Hokkaido, where loyal supporters of the Tokugawa clan staged a final, but unsuccessful stand against the Meiji government.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze vessel (detail)
    Bronze vessel (detail)

    In ancient Japan (prior to the Meiji era, 1868-1912), metalwork was solely for swords and Buddhist statues. During the Meiji era, a decree abolishing sword-wearing and the restoration of Shintoism, the original religion of Japan, as the national religion caused the making of metalwork to shift to objects for export and home consumption; the functions of objects and subject of decoration tended to be secular. This vase, designed with a style of Chinese bronze vessel, bears 8 different scenes on the entire body. There are four large panels, with subjects ranging from figurative to seascapes, on the main body of the vessel, and four small horizontal scenes, landscapes and seascapes are the subjects (possibly a display of the four seasons), on the bottom. The designs are done in relief. The borders of the panels are also ornamented with plant patterns, chrysanthemums and gingko tree leaves in particular common Japanese floral motif. A great deal of artistic appeal and distinctive styles are the trademark of Meiji metalwork.