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10 hits

  • Thumbnail for Kubera
    Kubera

    Dark, red sandstone artifact from Madhya Pradesh. 6 x 4.5 x 3 inches. One of the guardians of the eight directions, Kubera belongs to a class of ancient folk deities called yakshas, who were adopted by Buddhism, Jainism, and Hinduism. He represents the power of monetary wealth. He conventionally holds a bowl or pomegranate in his right hand and a moneybag in his left. A mongoose that has the power to vomit a wish-fulfilling gem normally accompanies him. This is a fine quality image that was originally made as an architectural detail for a Hindu temple.

  • Thumbnail for Boar (Varaha) Incarnation of Vishnu
    Boar (Varaha) Incarnation of Vishnu

    As described on the museum label, "According to Hindu mythology, the earth began to sink under the burden of evil or overpopulation, and Vishnu, assuming the form of a boar (Varaha), recovered her from the ocean. This work represents the moment when Varaha (usually depicted as an anthropomorphic figure with a boar's head) has rescued the earth, personified as a beautiful woman perched demurely on his bent left elbow. She lays her right hand gently on his snout both for support and as a token of gratitude. The serpents (nagas) below vishnu's left foot symbolize water." -- Red sandstone -- Coll. Art Institute of Chicago (Gift of Marilynn B. Alsdorf, 1997.707)

  • Thumbnail for Copy of Persian Miniature
    Copy of Persian Miniature

    8 x 14 inches. Depicts a palace scene. These are extremely well executed copies of 15th- and 16th-century Persian miniatures (Timurid and Safavid). They lend themselves to pedagogical purposes in several ways. First, they raise the issue of copies and how we approach and consider these; certainly they will not be the only works in the project that are relevant to such questions, but they are quite fine works. Second, and perhaps far more significant, is that they represent folios from manuscripts that were created at the Muslim courts of 16th-century Persia (Tabriz and Shiraz) and thus exemplify the subjects that typify Muslim manuscripts of the era. Opportunities to engage issues relevant to the Islamic world (considering that the vast majority of the world's Muslims live in Asia, not the Middle East) will be of great value to students. For example, these paintings lend themselves to discussions of the nature of iconoclasm in Islamic art, to what kinds of subjects might and which might not be depicted in painting, as well as to the diverse attitudes within various schools of Islam regarding the acceptability of painting. They include depictions of historical themes and themes from poetry. Thus they could also generate interesting research projects for students: they lend themselves to research on the styles of Persian painting they represent; to identification of the particular themes depicted; and of course students could likely identify the particular paintings they copy. Finally, because these styles of Persian painting formed an essential element in shaping the Mughal painting school that arose in 16th-century India (the two artists that headed the emperor Akbar's painting workshop came to India from the Safavid court at Tabriz), they represent a direct link to Mughal painting in India.

  • Thumbnail for Vishnu
    Vishnu

    Copper alloy; 20.5 inches in height. Vishnu is one of the three major deities in Hinduism and is thought to be the preserver of the universe. Here he is shown with his attributes of the conch shell ('sankha') and the wheel ('cakra') in two of his four hands, his dhoti neatly pleated and with meditation cords around his waist. His crown is typically cylindrical and surmounted with a bud-shaped finial and bordered with triangular foliate medallions. Created during the Vijayanagar period (1350-1565 CE), the god is posed to be carried by the temple priests in a parade-like procession through the streets.

  • Thumbnail for Copy of Persian Miniature
    Copy of Persian Miniature

    8 x 14 inches, depicting a hunting scene. These are extremely well executed copies of 15th- and 16th-century Persian miniatures (Timurid and Safavid). This image lends itself to pedagogical purposes in several ways. First, they raise the issue of copies and how we approach and consider these; certainly they will not be the only works in the project that are relevant to such questions, but they are quite fine works. Second, and perhaps far more significant, is that they represent folios from manuscripts that were created at the Muslim courts of 16th-century Persia (Tabriz and Shiraz) and thus exemplify the subjects that typify Muslim manuscripts of the era. Opportunities to engage issues relevant to the Islamic world (considering that the vast majority of the world's Muslims live in Asia, not the Middle East) will be of great value to students. For example, these paintings lend themselves to discussions of the nature of iconoclasm in Islamic art, to what kinds of subjects might and which might not be depicted in painting, as well as to the diverse attitudes within various schools of Islam regarding the acceptability of painting. They include depictions of historical themes and themes from poetry. Thus they could also generate interesting research projects for students: they lend themselves to research on the styles of Persian painting they represent; to identification of the particular themes depicted; and of course students could likely identify the particular paintings they copy. Finally, because these styles of Persian painting formed an essential element in shaping the Mughal painting school that arose in 16th-century India (the two artists that headed the emperor Akbar's painting workshop came to India from the Safavid court at Tabriz), they represent a direct link to Mughal painting in India.

  • Thumbnail for Copy of Persian Miniature
    Copy of Persian Miniature

    8 x 14 inches, depicting a hunting scene. These are extremely well executed copies of 15th- and 16th-century Persian miniatures (Timurid and Safavid). This image lends itself to pedagogical purposes in several ways. First, they raise the issue of copies and how we approach and consider these; certainly they will not be the only works in the project that are relevant to such questions, but they are quite fine works. Second, and perhaps far more significant, is that they represent folios from manuscripts that were created at the Muslim courts of 16th-century Persia (Tabriz and Shiraz) and thus exemplify the subjects that typify Muslim manuscripts of the era. Opportunities to engage issues relevant to the Islamic world (considering that the vast majority of the world's Muslims live in Asia, not the Middle East) will be of great value to students. For example, these paintings lend themselves to discussions of the nature of iconoclasm in Islamic art, to what kinds of subjects might and which might not be depicted in painting, as well as to the diverse attitudes within various schools of Islam regarding the acceptability of painting. They include depictions of historical themes and themes from poetry. Thus they could also generate interesting research projects for students: they lend themselves to research on the styles of Persian painting they represent; to identification of the particular themes depicted; and of course students could likely identify the particular paintings they copy. Finally, because these styles of Persian painting formed an essential element in shaping the Mughal painting school that arose in 16th-century India (the two artists that headed the emperor Akbar's painting workshop came to India from the Safavid court at Tabriz), they represent a direct link to Mughal painting in India.

  • Thumbnail for Vishnu and Sridevi
    Vishnu and Sridevi

    Recombined copper alloy figures of Vishnu and Sridevi showing how they would have originally looked as a pair. Sridevi is the consort of Vishnu.

  • Thumbnail for Copy of Persian Miniature
    Copy of Persian Miniature

    8 x 14 inches; subject matter here a palace scene. These are extremely well executed copies of 15th- and 16th-century Persian miniatures (Timurid and Safavid). This image lends itself to pedagogical purposes in several ways. First, they raise the issue of copies and how we approach and consider these; certainly they will not be the only works in the project that are relevant to such questions, but they are quite fine works. Second, and perhaps far more significant, is that they represent folios from manuscripts that were created at the Muslim courts of 16th-century Persia (Tabriz and Shiraz) and thus exemplify the subjects that typify Muslim manuscripts of the era. Opportunities to engage issues relevant to the Islamic world (considering that the vast majority of the world's Muslims live in Asia, not the Middle East) will be of great value to students. For example, these paintings lend themselves to discussions of the nature of iconoclasm in Islamic art, to what kinds of subjects might and which might not be depicted in painting, as well as to the diverse attitudes within various schools of Islam regarding the acceptability of painting. They include depictions of historical themes and themes from poetry. Thus they could also generate interesting research projects for students: they lend themselves to research on the styles of Persian painting they represent; to identification of the particular themes depicted; and of course students could likely identify the particular paintings they copy. Finally, because these styles of Persian painting formed an essential element in shaping the Mughal painting school that arose in 16th-century India (the two artists that headed the emperor Akbar's painting workshop came to India from the Safavid court at Tabriz), they represent a direct link to Mughal painting in India.

  • Thumbnail for Sridevi
    Sridevi

    Copper alloy; 16.5 inches in height. One of two consorts of Vishnu, this figure created, during the Vijayanagar period (1350-1565), would have flanked to the right of the Vishnu companion figure also in this collection. The goddess holds a lotus bud in her left hand and wears a neatly pleated dhoti with meditation cords around her waist. The voluptuously sensuous deity wears a tiered crown and drapes her right arm gracefully from her hip.

  • Thumbnail for Copy of Persian Miniature
    Copy of Persian Miniature

    8 x 14 inches; subject matter a meeting in an exterior setting. These are extremely well executed copies of 15th- and 16th-century Persian miniatures (Timurid and Safavid). This image lends itself to pedagogical purposes in several ways. First, they raise the issue of copies and how we approach and consider these; certainly they will not be the only works in the project that are relevant to such questions, but they are quite fine works. Second, and perhaps far more significant, is that they represent folios from manuscripts that were created at the Muslim courts of 16th-century Persia (Tabriz and Shiraz) and thus exemplify the subjects that typify Muslim manuscripts of the era. Opportunities to engage issues relevant to the Islamic world (considering that the vast majority of the world's Muslims live in Asia, not the Middle East) will be of great value to students. For example, these paintings lend themselves to discussions of the nature of iconoclasm in Islamic art, to what kinds of subjects might and which might not be depicted in painting, as well as to the diverse attitudes within various schools of Islam regarding the acceptability of painting. They include depictions of historical themes and themes from poetry. Thus they could also generate interesting research projects for students: they lend themselves to research on the styles of Persian painting they represent; to identification of the particular themes depicted; and of course students could likely identify the particular paintings they copy. Finally, because these styles of Persian painting formed an essential element in shaping the Mughal painting school that arose in 16th-century India (the two artists that headed the emperor Akbar's painting workshop came to India from the Safavid court at Tabriz), they represent a direct link to Mughal painting in India.