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14 hits

  • Thumbnail for Small plate - detail of top design
    Small plate - detail of top design

    Stoneware, Dia. 5 3/8". Chinese ceramics are far better understood than Southeast Asian wares because careful excavations and the imperial records of the kilns of Jingdezhen, which began producing ceramics in the Tang dynasty, have provided a clearer chronology of Chinese wares. Although the ceramics of the imperial kilns differ from wares made specifically for export, the stylistic development of the two types share enough traits so that the one informs the other. The Chinese wares produced with underglaze blue range from folkish kitchen ware to sophisticated imperial porcelains. Variations in color from grey to a vivid blue depend on the source of the cobalt. Local Chinese cobalt, discovered in the fifteenth century, has a high content of manganese, which causes the blue to tend toward a pale grey, while the high iron and low manganese content of the imported Middle Eastern cobalt creates an intense blue. Yuan (fourteenth century) blue-and-white wares have been discovered in insular Southeast Asia, but it was during the Ming dynasty that the quantity of blue-and-white exports increased greatly. These small plates are glazed in underglaze blue that is painted freely in plant-like motif. The base is glazed and has an underglaze blue marking that may indicate the potter. Chinese wares can be distinguished from Thai by the clay body, and by the fact glaze is often painted on the base and over the footring.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese feather fan with birds and flowers (side 2)
    Chinese feather fan with birds and flowers (side 2)

    This fan displays a pair of peacocks and peonies and other flowers, which are common subjects in these types of fan. Although its condition is poor,it is a very interesting artifacts. The Chinese export of feather fans first appeared in Europe during the first quarter of the 19th century. They are usually made of goose feathers (occasionally with added peacock feathers on the top) mounted on sticks which can be made of a variety of materials, including ivory and bone. The frames of the fans are carved, showing the quality of their craftsmanship, with flowers and classical scripts, which could be either an imitation of Oracle bone characters or seal/clerical scripts. Originally these fans would have been very costly.

  • Thumbnail for Small plate - detail of top design
    Small plate - detail of top design

    Stoneware, Dia. 5 3/8". Chinese ceramics are far better understood than Southeast Asian wares because careful excavations and the imperial records of the kilns of Jingdezhen, which began producing ceramics in the Tang dynasty, have provided a clearer chronology of Chinese wares. Although the ceramics of the imperial kilns differ from wares made specifically for export, the stylistic development of the two types share enough traits so that the one informs the other. The Chinese wares produced with underglaze blue range from folkish kitchen ware to sophisticated imperial porcelains. Variations in color from grey to a vivid blue depend on the source of the cobalt. Local Chinese cobalt, discovered in the fifteenth century, has a high content of manganese, which causes the blue to tend toward a pale grey, while the high iron and low manganese content of the imported Middle Eastern cobalt creates an intense blue. Yuan (fourteenth century) blue-and-white wares have been discovered in insular Southeast Asia, but it was during the Ming dynasty that the quantity of blue-and-white exports increased greatly. These small plates are glazed in underglaze blue that is painted freely in plant-like motif. The base is glazed and has an underglaze blue marking that may indicate the potter. Chinese wares can be distinguished from Thai by the clay body, and by the fact glaze is often painted on the base and over the footring.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese feather fan with male figures and floral patterns (side 2)
    Chinese feather fan with male figures and floral patterns (side 2)

    This fan centers on two male figures (likely from literary or historical novels) with floral patterns around, which is much more rare than the bird and flower themes. Although their conditions are poor, they are very interesting artifacts. The Chinese export of feather fans first appeared in Europe during the first quarter of the 19th century. They are usually made of goose feathers (occasionally with added peacock feathers on the top) mounted on sticks which can be made of a variety of materials, including ivory and bone. The frames of the fans are carved, showing the quality of their craftsmanship, with flowers and classical scripts, which could be either an imitation of Oracle bone characters or seal/clerical scripts. Originally these fans would have been very costly.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese feather fan with birds and flowers (side 1 )
    Chinese feather fan with birds and flowers (side 1 )

    This fan displays a pair of peacocks and peonies and other flowers, which are common subjects in these types of fan. Although its condition is poor,it is a very interesting artifacts. The Chinese export of feather fans first appeared in Europe during the first quarter of the 19th century. They are usually made of goose feathers (occasionally with added peacock feathers on the top) mounted on sticks which can be made of a variety of materials, including ivory and bone. The frames of the fans are carved, showing the quality of their craftsmanship, with flowers and classical scripts, which could be either an imitation of Oracle bone characters or seal/clerical scripts. Originally these fans would have been very costly.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese feather fan with male figures and floral patterns (detail)
    Chinese feather fan with male figures and floral patterns (detail)

    This fan centers on two male figures (likely from literary or historical novels) with floral patterns around, which is much more rare than the bird and flower themes. Although their conditions are poor, they are very interesting artifacts. The Chinese export of feather fans first appeared in Europe during the first quarter of the 19th century. They are usually made of goose feathers (occasionally with added peacock feathers on the top) mounted on sticks which can be made of a variety of materials, including ivory and bone. The frames of the fans are carved, showing the quality of their craftsmanship, with flowers and classical scripts, which could be either an imitation of Oracle bone characters or seal/clerical scripts. Originally these fans would have been very costly.

  • Thumbnail for Small plate
    Small plate

    Stoneware, Dia. 5 3/8". Chinese ceramics are far better understood than Southeast Asian wares because careful excavations and the imperial records of the kilns of Jingdezhen, which began producing ceramics in the Tang dynasty, have provided a clearer chronology of Chinese wares. Although the ceramics of the imperial kilns differ from wares made specifically for export, the stylistic development of the two types share enough traits so that the one informs the other. The Chinese wares produced with underglaze blue range from folkish kitchen ware to sophisticated imperial porcelains. Variations in color from grey to a vivid blue depend on the source of the cobalt. Local Chinese cobalt, discovered in the fifteenth century, has a high content of manganese, which causes the blue to tend toward a pale grey, while the high iron and low manganese content of the imported Middle Eastern cobalt creates an intense blue. Yuan (fourteenth century) blue-and-white wares have been discovered in insular Southeast Asia, but it was during the Ming dynasty that the quantity of blue-and-white exports increased greatly. These small plates are glazed in underglaze blue that is painted freely in plant-like motif. The base is glazed and has an underglaze blue marking that may indicate the potter. Chinese wares can be distinguished from Thai by the clay body, and by the fact glaze is often painted on the base and over the footring.

  • Thumbnail for Small plate - detail of top design
    Small plate - detail of top design

    Stoneware, Dia. 5 3/8". Chinese ceramics are far better understood than Southeast Asian wares because careful excavations and the imperial records of the kilns of Jingdezhen, which began producing ceramics in the Tang dynasty, have provided a clearer chronology of Chinese wares. Although the ceramics of the imperial kilns differ from wares made specifically for export, the stylistic development of the two types share enough traits so that the one informs the other. The Chinese wares produced with underglaze blue range from folkish kitchen ware to sophisticated imperial porcelains. Variations in color from grey to a vivid blue depend on the source of the cobalt. Local Chinese cobalt, discovered in the fifteenth century, has a high content of manganese, which causes the blue to tend toward a pale grey, while the high iron and low manganese content of the imported Middle Eastern cobalt creates an intense blue. Yuan (fourteenth century) blue-and-white wares have been discovered in insular Southeast Asia, but it was during the Ming dynasty that the quantity of blue-and-white exports increased greatly. These small plates are glazed in underglaze blue that is painted freely in plant-like motif. The base is glazed and has an underglaze blue marking that may indicate the potter. Chinese wares can be distinguished from Thai by the clay body, and by the fact glaze is often painted on the base and over the footring.

  • Thumbnail for Small plate - detail of bottom
    Small plate - detail of bottom

    Stoneware, Dia. 5 3/8". Chinese ceramics are far better understood than Southeast Asian wares because careful excavations and the imperial records of the kilns of Jingdezhen, which began producing ceramics in the Tang dynasty, have provided a clearer chronology of Chinese wares. Although the ceramics of the imperial kilns differ from wares made specifically for export, the stylistic development of the two types share enough traits so that the one informs the other. The Chinese wares produced with underglaze blue range from folkish kitchen ware to sophisticated imperial porcelains. Variations in color from grey to a vivid blue depend on the source of the cobalt. Local Chinese cobalt, discovered in the fifteenth century, has a high content of manganese, which causes the blue to tend toward a pale grey, while the high iron and low manganese content of the imported Middle Eastern cobalt creates an intense blue. Yuan (fourteenth century) blue-and-white wares have been discovered in insular Southeast Asia, but it was during the Ming dynasty that the quantity of blue-and-white exports increased greatly. These small plates are glazed in underglaze blue that is painted freely in plant-like motif. The base is glazed and has an underglaze blue marking that may indicate the potter. Chinese wares can be distinguished from Thai by the clay body, and by the fact glaze is often painted on the base and over the footring.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese feather fan with birds and flowers (detail)
    Chinese feather fan with birds and flowers (detail)

    This fan displays a pair of peacocks and peonies and other flowers, which are common subjects in these types of fan. Although its condition is poor,it is a very interesting artifacts. The Chinese export of feather fans first appeared in Europe during the first quarter of the 19th century. They are usually made of goose feathers (occasionally with added peacock feathers on the top) mounted on sticks which can be made of a variety of materials, including ivory and bone. The frames of the fans are carved, showing the quality of their craftsmanship, with flowers and classical scripts, which could be either an imitation of Oracle bone characters or seal/clerical scripts. Originally these fans would have been very costly.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese feather fan with male figures and floral patterns (side 1)
    Chinese feather fan with male figures and floral patterns (side 1)

    This fan centers on two male figures (likely from literary or historical novels) with floral patterns around, which is much more rare than the bird and flower themes. Although their conditions are poor, they are very interesting artifacts. The Chinese export of feather fans first appeared in Europe during the first quarter of the 19th century. They are usually made of goose feathers (occasionally with added peacock feathers on the top) mounted on sticks which can be made of a variety of materials, including ivory and bone. The frames of the fans are carved, showing the quality of their craftsmanship, with flowers and classical scripts, which could be either an imitation of Oracle bone characters or seal/clerical scripts. Originally these fans would have been very costly.

  • Thumbnail for Small plate - detail of top design
    Small plate - detail of top design

    Stoneware, Dia. 5 3/8". Chinese ceramics are far better understood than Southeast Asian wares because careful excavations and the imperial records of the kilns of Jingdezhen, which began producing ceramics in the Tang dynasty, have provided a clearer chronology of Chinese wares. Although the ceramics of the imperial kilns differ from wares made specifically for export, the stylistic development of the two types share enough traits so that the one informs the other. The Chinese wares produced with underglaze blue range from folkish kitchen ware to sophisticated imperial porcelains. Variations in color from grey to a vivid blue depend on the source of the cobalt. Local Chinese cobalt, discovered in the fifteenth century, has a high content of manganese, which causes the blue to tend toward a pale grey, while the high iron and low manganese content of the imported Middle Eastern cobalt creates an intense blue. Yuan (fourteenth century) blue-and-white wares have been discovered in insular Southeast Asia, but it was during the Ming dynasty that the quantity of blue-and-white exports increased greatly. These small plates are glazed in underglaze blue that is painted freely in plant-like motif. The base is glazed and has an underglaze blue marking that may indicate the potter. Chinese wares can be distinguished from Thai by the clay body, and by the fact glaze is often painted on the base and over the footring.

  • Thumbnail for Small plate - view from side
    Small plate - view from side

    Stoneware, Dia. 5 3/8". Chinese ceramics are far better understood than Southeast Asian wares because careful excavations and the imperial records of the kilns of Jingdezhen, which began producing ceramics in the Tang dynasty, have provided a clearer chronology of Chinese wares. Although the ceramics of the imperial kilns differ from wares made specifically for export, the stylistic development of the two types share enough traits so that the one informs the other. The Chinese wares produced with underglaze blue range from folkish kitchen ware to sophisticated imperial porcelains. Variations in color from grey to a vivid blue depend on the source of the cobalt. Local Chinese cobalt, discovered in the fifteenth century, has a high content of manganese, which causes the blue to tend toward a pale grey, while the high iron and low manganese content of the imported Middle Eastern cobalt creates an intense blue. Yuan (fourteenth century) blue-and-white wares have been discovered in insular Southeast Asia, but it was during the Ming dynasty that the quantity of blue-and-white exports increased greatly. These small plates are glazed in underglaze blue that is painted freely in plant-like motif. The base is glazed and has an underglaze blue marking that may indicate the potter. Chinese wares can be distinguished from Thai by the clay body, and by the fact glaze is often painted on the base and over the footring.

  • Thumbnail for Small plate - detail of top design
    Small plate - detail of top design

    Stoneware, Dia. 5 3/8". Chinese ceramics are far better understood than Southeast Asian wares because careful excavations and the imperial records of the kilns of Jingdezhen, which began producing ceramics in the Tang dynasty, have provided a clearer chronology of Chinese wares. Although the ceramics of the imperial kilns differ from wares made specifically for export, the stylistic development of the two types share enough traits so that the one informs the other. The Chinese wares produced with underglaze blue range from folkish kitchen ware to sophisticated imperial porcelains. Variations in color from grey to a vivid blue depend on the source of the cobalt. Local Chinese cobalt, discovered in the fifteenth century, has a high content of manganese, which causes the blue to tend toward a pale grey, while the high iron and low manganese content of the imported Middle Eastern cobalt creates an intense blue. Yuan (fourteenth century) blue-and-white wares have been discovered in insular Southeast Asia, but it was during the Ming dynasty that the quantity of blue-and-white exports increased greatly. These small plates are glazed in underglaze blue that is painted freely in plant-like motif. The base is glazed and has an underglaze blue marking that may indicate the potter. Chinese wares can be distinguished from Thai by the clay body, and by the fact glaze is often painted on the base and over the footring.