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Browsing 499 results for facet Temporal (Time) with value of China - Qing Dynasty 1644 - 1911.
  • Thumbnail for Confucius
    Confucius

    Portrait of Confucius, with Chinese inscription underneath. Based on image carved in stone at Qufu, Confucius' hometown.

  • Thumbnail for Water dropper for ink stone
    Water dropper for ink stone

    Small glazed ceramic container used for holding water for grinding ink on a Chinese ink stone. Mark on bottom gives Daoguang era of Qing dynasty as date.

  • Thumbnail for Embroidered baby hat
    Embroidered baby hat

    Hat put on infant or young child in order to protect it from evil spirits.

  • Thumbnail for Cloissone bowl - bottom view
    Cloissone bowl - bottom view

    Bottom of bowl showing metalwork rim as well as "bottom" of the lotus image.

  • Thumbnail for Pink embroidered garment - back view
    Pink embroidered garment - back view

    This view shows how the textile artist conceptualized of the embroidery as flowing around the woman's figure. It also highlights how the garment is one continuous piece of silk wrapped around, rather than pieced together as much modern clothing is today.

  • Thumbnail for Manchu shoe  - top view
    Manchu shoe - top view

    Embroidered shoe worn by a female member of the Manchu ethnicity during the Qing era. As a rule, Manchu women did not bind their feet.

  • Thumbnail for Coin sword
    Coin sword

    Sword made of coins threaded onto a string. Said to have been hung over the cots of newborn babies to ward off evil spirits.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze censor - detail of bottom
    Bronze censor - detail of bottom

    This neatly fashioned rectangular box and openwork cover cleverly becomes a utilitarian incense burner, the pierced cover cast to allow incense to subtly drift upwards through a Buddhist inspired swastika decoration. The taotie handles and the geometric pattern on the ground areas add an archaistic element to the design. The base is inscribed with a dedicatory inscription. The base is inscribed with a dedicatory inscription to the person or persons receiving the gfit. In a panel surrounded by meander squares, there are twenty charcters in seal script. Of these, the character "chen" for "minister or officer" appears twice following characters which must have disignated names, and the character "shi" for "gentleman" follows in the same fashion. 4 1/8in. high, 6in. x 4 5/8 inches wide.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze rice measure - side view
    Bronze rice measure - side view

    This rectangular tapering vessel is an example of the everyday, utilitarian objects that were fashioned in mold cast bronze in the 18th century. The decoration, which incorporates neatly finished human figures in genre scenes along with typical decorative border embellishments, no doubt was fashioned for use in an important household, rather than for use in a less grand setting. 3 3/4in. high, 5 1/2in wide.

  • Thumbnail for Landscape
    Landscape by Wu Tao, 1840-1895

    This painting reflects a strong traditional influence. The inscription: Spring breezes blow over the Peach Blossom Brook, and a touch of green circles the gray land.

  • Thumbnail for Large porcelain dish - sideview
    Large porcelain dish - sideview

    The decoration on this blue and white charger was inspired by Islamic ceramics of the 16th and 17th centuries and influenced the decorative patterns used on 18th century Dutch Delft wares.

  • Thumbnail for Tang Yin portrait, full view
    Tang Yin portrait, full view by Signed 'Tang Yin'

    Chinese vertical scroll painting, likely a forgery; colors on silk, brocade frame mounted on paper, flush roller with brocade ends; image area 20.4 cm x 55.8 cm; subject Chang Hsien the archer, patron of child-bearing; birth of male child announced by hanging bow at door or gate, calligraphy, five seals. The subject matter does not match the artist’s inscription. Tang Yin is very well known for his versatility, including calligraphy, figures, and landscapes. He was also known for his literary talents and free-spirited lifestyle. His artistic reputation is reflected in many writings, including novels and dramas in later eras and his love of women is depicted in the performing arts and popular culture. Tang Yin was known as a commercial painter who sold his works and took commissions. Many of the extant works that bear his signature are forgeries. The artist of this painting displays a unique manner in his brushwork, with angular and edgy outlines that reflect the influence of Zhou Chen (still alive in the 1530s), another famous painter of Tang Yin’s era. Tang Yin originally studied painting with Zhou Chen, however Zhou Chen occasionally ghost-painted for Tang Yin due to the huge demand for Tang’s paintings. Another possibility is that the inscription of this painting was done by Tang Yin and the figure was done by Zhou Chen.

  • Thumbnail for Xu Diao, Ferret and Mellon, view of roller
    Xu Diao, Ferret and Mellon, view of roller by Zhao, Zhiqian

    Chinese hanging scroll with vertically-oriented painting depicting a ferret or porcupine nibbling a melon. The image area is 40 cm x 108 cm and was made with black and grey ink on silk and mounted with a brocade frame on a paper mount with teak roller. Zhao, well-known for his calligraphy and seal carving, is one of the most important Qing painters. His style synthesized the styles of Xu Wei ((1521-1593), shi Tao (or Dao Ji, among the “Four Monks of the Ming†1630 – unknown), and Li Shan (1686-unknown). This painting reflects one of Zhao’s later interests in zoology and marine creatures, in addition to his whimsical commentary on the ferret chewing the melon.

  • Thumbnail for Autumn Leaves and Chrysanthemums, full view
    Autumn Leaves and Chrysanthemums, full view by Jin Dui

    Horizontal Chinese painting; ink and colors on paper; 34.2 cm x 27.3 cm; white chrysanthemums, symbol of 9th month, autumn and fruit blossoms; calligraphy and one seal by artist.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze censor - open
    Bronze censor - open

    This neatly fashioned rectangular box and openwork cover cleverly becomes a utilitarian incense burner, the pierced cover cast to allow incense to subtly drift upwards through a Buddhist inspired swastika decoration. The taotie handles and the geometric pattern on the ground areas add an archaistic element to the design. The base is inscribed with a dedicatory inscription. 41/8in. high, 6in. x 4 5/8 inches wide

  • Thumbnail for Bronze mirror stand
    Bronze mirror stand

    Cast in the form of a recumbent unicorn or qilin supporting a crescent shaped base for a mirror, this mythical beast carries its head turned to its left and has its legs folded beneath the equine body. In traditional Chinese mythology the predominant characteristic of the qilin is that of benevolence and kindness, offering an evocative addition to a court dressing table. 5.75 inches high x 7 5/16 wide x 4.25 deep.

  • Thumbnail for Porcelain saucer dish
    Porcelain saucer dish

    This doucai enameled shallow dish is decorated on the interior with a central lappet roundel within double circle borders; the exterior depicts three cranes, emblematic of longevity amongst cloud scrolls and fungus. The base is inscribed with a Yongzheng (1723-1735) reign mark and is of the period, however the quality of the enameling and porcelain suggest that it was not intended for the Imperial household. 1 7/16 inches high x 7 1/16 inches wide.

  • Thumbnail for Tang Yin portrait, close-up of figure
    Tang Yin portrait, close-up of figure by Signed 'Tang Yin'

    Chinese vertical scroll painting, likely a forgery; colors on silk, brocade frame mounted on paper, flush roller with brocade ends; image area 20.4 cm x 55.8 cm; subject Chang Hsien the archer, patron of child-bearing; birth of male child announced by hanging bow at door or gate, calligraphy, five seals. The subject matter does not match the artist’s inscription. Tang Yin is very well known for his versatility, including calligraphy, figures, and landscapes. He was also known for his literary talents and free-spirited lifestyle. His artistic reputation is reflected in many writings, including novels and dramas in later eras and his love of women is depicted in the performing arts and popular culture. Tang Yin was known as a commercial painter who sold his works and took commissions. Many of the extant works that bear his signature are forgeries. The artist of this painting displays a unique manner in his brushwork, with angular and edgy outlines that reflect the influence of Zhou Chen (still alive in the 1530s), another famous painter of Tang Yin’s era. Tang Yin originally studied painting with Zhou Chen, however Zhou Chen occasionally ghost-painted for Tang Yin due to the huge demand for Tang’s paintings. Another possibility is that the inscription of this painting was done by Tang Yin and the figure was done by Zhou Chen.

  • Thumbnail for Landscapes and Figures, mountain scene with house
    Landscapes and Figures, mountain scene with house by Ren Xun

    Chinese painting of a mountain scene that is part of a set of four related paintings. Ren Xun was the younger brother of Ren Xiong (1820-1864) and his family members were successful commercial painters in Shanghai and nearby regions and skilled in many subjects, including portraiture. Ren Xun followed the style of one of the eccentric painters, Chen Hongshu (1598-1652) in his figure paintings and was also skilled in bird-and-flower subjects. Both brothers were active in Shanghai and their styles are labeled “Shanghai School†for their colorful and decorative features and popular subjects.

  • Thumbnail for Shadow puppet (set of 3)
    Shadow puppet (set of 3)

    These shadow puppets represent one of the traditional Chinese crafts. They also represent one of the popular-level puppet theater traditions in China (the others being hand puppets and string puppets). The shadow puppets are cut and carved out of thin sections of hide, which is then given coatings of color. These examples are in pristine condition and retain their brilliant colors. One of the shadow puppets wears a Manchu headdress and Manchu platform shoes. The treatment of the eye sockets suggests that these puppets were made in the Beijing area

  • Thumbnail for Imperial bronze bell (handle detail)
    Imperial bronze bell (handle detail)

    This bell is dated by the inscription in a cartouche as having been made in the 50th year of the reign of Emperor Kangxi, i.e. 1711. The bell was evidently meant to be part of a larger set of bells, thus it represents a continuation of the ancient practice of producing sets of bells that were suspended from a rack. Each bell was specifically manufactured to produce a particular note in the Chinese musical scale. The inscription on the opposite side of the bell has three characters indicating which musical note the bell produces when struck. In addition, this bell is an excellent example of superior quality, imperial level bronze casting.

  • Thumbnail for Imperial throne cover
    Imperial throne cover

    Prince's imperial yellow silk throne cover with a central embroidered (three and four toed) dragon. The dragon is flanked by dragons on each corner, auspicious clouds, and magic pearls on the sides.

  • Thumbnail for Pair of ancestor portraits (female)
    Pair of ancestor portraits (female)

    Dating from the late 19th or early 20th century, these two ancestor paintings are typical of the genre. The individuals are in formal poses and each wears formal clothing. He wears formal court dress; she is shown in wedding finery, including an elaborate crown and a red robe. Both have rank badges on the front of their garments. Women were denied any role in officialdom, but were entitled to wear the rank badge of their husband. In the late nineteenth century it was customary for the portrait of the wife to be placed at the right side of that of her husband (on the viewer’s left). The use of shading on the faces indicates the influence of Western art and most likely that of photography. The cranes depicted at the bottom of the portraits are symbols of longevity.

  • Thumbnail for Red shoes for bound feet (pair)
    Red shoes for bound feet (pair)

    Pair of embroidered shoes for bound feet of Chinese women: would appear to come from South China.

  • Thumbnail for Vertical painting of bird and flowers
    Vertical painting of bird and flowers

    Vertical painting of bird, lotus, and autumn grasses.