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  • Thumbnail for Jade Bok Choy
    Jade Bok Choy

    A carved jade bok choy (cabbage) in white and green jade.

  • Thumbnail for General Charles
    General Charles

    Portrait of General Charles "Chinese" Gordon, dressed here in robes presented by the Emperor, who led the Chinese army to victory against the Taipings.

  • Thumbnail for Ruins of the Yuan Ming Yuan
    Ruins of the Yuan Ming Yuan by Childe, Thomas

    Ruins of the Yuan Ming Yuan (Summer Palace), photographed by Thomas Childe in 1875. On October 18, 1860, Britain's Lord Elgin ordered his troops to destroy the summer palace designed by Jesuit architects for Emperor Qianlong. That same day, the Qing capitulated to further British demands.

  • Thumbnail for Confucius
    Confucius

    Portrait of Confucius, with Chinese inscription underneath. Based on image carved in stone at Qufu, Confucius' hometown.

  • Thumbnail for Yixing teapot - bottom
    Yixing teapot - bottom

    Bottom of Yixing teapot showing impression of seal.

  • Thumbnail for Embroidered baby hat
    Embroidered baby hat

    Hat put on infant or young child in order to protect it from evil spirits.

  • Thumbnail for Small black shoes
    Small black shoes

    Shoes for bound feet approximately 3 inches in length.

  • Thumbnail for Geese on a Pond [A]
    Geese on a Pond [A] by Ren Zun, 1835-1893

    This pair of paintings was painted by an artist of the "Shanghai School" at that time a derogatory term applied by the traditionalists. He was a member of a family of professional artists. The inscription: Painted in the summer of 1872 in the reign of Emperor Tangzhi by Fuchang, Ren Zun, in Wumen.

  • Thumbnail for Large porcelain dish - sideview
    Large porcelain dish - sideview

    The decoration on this blue and white charger was inspired by Islamic ceramics of the 16th and 17th centuries and influenced the decorative patterns used on 18th century Dutch Delft wares.

  • Thumbnail for Shallow porcelain saucer dish - detail of bottom
    Shallow porcelain saucer dish - detail of bottom

    This doucai enameled dish is decorated with maidens in a terrace garden scene within a border of pine, prunus and bamboo, the “three friends of winterâ€. These plants are emblematic of longevity, as each hearty growth survives the cold, harsh winter months. The dish is inscribed on the base with an apocryphal Ming Dynasty Zhenghua (1465-1487) reign mark, but the decoration, enamel technique and subject matter are clearly 18th century.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze censor
    Bronze censor

    This neatly fashioned rectangular box and openwork cover cleverly becomes a utilitarian incense burner, the pierced cover cast to allow incense to subtly drift upwards through a Buddhist inspired swastika decoration. The taotie handles and the geometric pattern on the ground areas add an archaistic element to the design. The base is inscribed with a dedicatory inscription to the person or persons receiving the gfit. In a panel surrounded by meander squares, there are twenty charcters in seal script. Of these, the character "chen" for "minister or officer" appears twice following characters which must have disignated names, and the character "shi" for "gentleman" follows in the same fashion. 4 1/8in. high, 6in. x 4 5/8 inches wide

  • Thumbnail for Bronze ritual vessel gu - central view
    Bronze ritual vessel gu - central view

    In the same tradition as the preceding object, this well cast archaistic revival vessel is decorated with the requisite zoomorphic design employing the use of taotie masks and classical leiwen background pattern. The solidly defined flanges and the three registers of decorative spaces (upper, central and lower) reflect the metal smith’s attention to the strict orthodoxy of ancient bronze decoration.

  • Thumbnail for Pink embroidered garment - back view
    Pink embroidered garment - back view

    This view shows how the textile artist conceptualized of the embroidery as flowing around the woman's figure. It also highlights how the garment is one continuous piece of silk wrapped around, rather than pieced together as much modern clothing is today.

  • Thumbnail for Small Purse
    Small Purse

    Embroidered purse of about 3 inches square sowing images of butterflies and peonies. Given the subject matter of the images, it was probably used by a woman.

  • Thumbnail for Chrysanthemums and Birds by Rock
    Chrysanthemums and Birds by Rock by Zhang, Gun

    Chinese hanging scroll with vertically-oriented painting and a bronze-colored brocade silk mounting. The image is 33 cm x 120 cm and has dry, lively brush strokes illustrating an autumn scene of flowering chrysanthemum emerging from a deeply worn rock with two birds 'fighting' while a third bird perches above.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze ritual vessel fanggu
    Bronze ritual vessel fanggu

    This solidly cast archaistic model of an ancient classical ritual vessel was cast for use as decoration in an upper class household or scholarly pavilion. The fashion of having visual manifestations of ancient objects was an important one in Manchu court circles where great effort was made to demonstrate an affinity to classical Han culture as the foreign Qing rulers were seriously consolidating their rule over China – a process that started with the overthrow of the ethnically Chinese Ming Dynasty in 1644. 15.25 inches high x 7.5 wide ; base 4.5 inches.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze ritual vessel gu
    Bronze ritual vessel gu

    In the same tradition as the preceding object, this well cast archaistic revival vessel is decorated with the requisite zoomorphic design employing the use of taotie masks and classical leiwen background pattern. The solidly defined flanges and the three registers of decorative spaces (upper, central and lower) reflect the metal smith’s attention to the strict orthodoxy of ancient bronze decoration. College of Wooster records show several Chinese characters are painted on the inside face of flanges. One legible character is "shou", which means longevity. Over these characters are four others in red - the first is "Song" for the dynasty, the fourth means "recorded", and the second may be "liang", meaning good in quality. 16 inches high x 7.75 wide; base of 4.75 inches.

  • Thumbnail for Tang Yin portrait, character inscription
    Tang Yin portrait, character inscription by Signed 'Tang Yin'

    Chinese vertical scroll painting, likely a forgery; colors on silk, brocade frame mounted on paper, flush roller with brocade ends; image area 20.4 cm x 55.8 cm; subject Chang Hsien the archer, patron of child-bearing; birth of male child announced by hanging bow at door or gate, calligraphy, five seals. The subject matter does not match the artist’s inscription. Tang Yin is very well known for his versatility, including calligraphy, figures, and landscapes. He was also known for his literary talents and free-spirited lifestyle.

  • Thumbnail for Lotus, characters
    Lotus, characters by Wu Shouxian

    Chinese hanging scroll with vertically-oriented painting; black ink and trace of red on paper; image area 31 cm x 132.4 cm; brocade frame, flush roller with brocade ends; lotus represents purity, perfection, summer, and the flower carried by Ho Hsien-Ku, the eighth of the eight immortals revered in Buddhist worship; calligraphy, one seal by the artist.

  • Thumbnail for Large porcelain dish
    Large porcelain dish

    The decoration on this blue and white charger was inspired by Islamic ceramics of the 16th and 17th centuries and influenced the decorative patterns used on 18th century Dutch Delft wares. 14 7/8 inches wide; 2.25 inches high.

  • Thumbnail for Woman’s coat (front)
    Woman’s coat (front)

    This garment with the accompanying skirt are typical of the late 19th – early 20th century feminine fashions. A lithographed print by the late 19th century Shanghai artist Wu Youru depicts two women wearing such garments posing in a photographer’s studio.

  • Thumbnail for Rank badge (part of set)
    Rank badge (part of set)

    These late nineteenth century rank badges were for use by holders of civil office (as opposed to military office). Civil officials of the second rank were entitled to wear a badge depicting a golden pheasant; officials of the fifth rank used the emblem of a silver pheasant. The bird emblems are surrounded by auspicious images. These rank badges could be elaborately produced, utilizing a range of embroidery stitches, metallic thread, kesi tapestry weaving technique and appliquéd motifs. There are two golden pheasant rank badges in this set (although they have been photographed as one, apparently the photographer was unaware that there was a second identical badge below the top one); the one on the bottom is split up the center for attachment to the front of the garment.

  • Thumbnail for Woman’s skirt (detail)
    Woman’s skirt (detail)

    In all respects (cut, design, embroidered designs), these two garments are typical of the late 19th – early 20th century feminine fashions. The skirt is an example of one way such garments were fastened around the waist – by placing fabric loops over cloth buttons. A lithographed print by the late 19th century Shanghai artist Wu Youru depicts two women wearing such garments posing in a photographer’s studio.

  • Thumbnail for Woman’s coat (back sleeve detail)
    Woman’s coat (back sleeve detail)

    This garment with the accompanying skirt are typical of the late 19th – early 20th century feminine fashions. A lithographed print by the late 19th century Shanghai artist Wu Youru depicts two women wearing such garments posing in a photographer’s studio.

  • Thumbnail for Imperial bronze bell (side detail)
    Imperial bronze bell (side detail)

    This bell is dated by the inscription in a cartouche as having been made in the 50th year of the reign of Emperor Kangxi, i.e. 1711. The bell was evidently meant to be part of a larger set of bells, thus it represents a continuation of the ancient practice of producing sets of bells that were suspended from a rack. Each bell was specifically manufactured to produce a particular note in the Chinese musical scale. The inscription on the opposite side of the bell has three characters indicating which musical note the bell produces when struck. In addition, this bell is an excellent example of superior quality, imperial level bronze casting.