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Browsing 499 results for facet Temporal (Time) with value of China - Qing Dynasty 1644 - 1911.
  • Thumbnail for Qiu Jin
    Qiu Jin

    Portrait of Qiu Jin, a "spirited radical" woman and supporter of Sun Yat-sen's Revolutionary Alliance.

  • Thumbnail for Beijing Summer Palace
    Beijing Summer Palace

    View of the hills of the Summer Palace in Beijing, once inhabited by the imperial family.

  • Thumbnail for Two children
    Two children

    Colorized postcard, dated October 10, 1908, with English script at bottom of two children in traditional dress in San Francisco's Chinatown. Inscription reads: "10/10/08 Hey Billy, which is the boy and which is the girl? Guess and I will send it to you --Y.E. (?)" Printed red text along bottom reads: "No. 16, San Francisco, California. Chinese Aristocrats. Reduced to poverty by earthquake and fire. April 18, 1906."

  • Thumbnail for Bronze censor
    Bronze censor

    This neatly fashioned rectangular box and openwork cover cleverly becomes a utilitarian incense burner, the pierced cover cast to allow incense to subtly drift upwards through a Buddhist inspired swastika decoration. The taotie handles and the geometric pattern on the ground areas add an archaistic element to the design. The base is inscribed with a dedicatory inscription to the person or persons receiving the gfit. In a panel surrounded by meander squares, there are twenty charcters in seal script. Of these, the character "chen" for "minister or officer" appears twice following characters which must have disignated names, and the character "shi" for "gentleman" follows in the same fashion. 4 1/8in. high, 6in. x 4 5/8 inches wide

  • Thumbnail for Landscape
    Landscape by Wu Tao, 1840-1895

    This painting reflects a strong traditional influence. The inscription: Spring breezes blow over the Peach Blossom Brook, and a touch of green circles the gray land.

  • Thumbnail for Dish with red bat motif - top view
    Dish with red bat motif - top view

    The top of the pedestal dish shows more auspicious symbols, the most prominent being the image of peaches at the center of the plate. Peaches represent longevity in Chinese culture.

  • Thumbnail for Dish with red bat motif - bottom view
    Dish with red bat motif - bottom view

    Bottom view shows hollow pedestal foot of the dish.

  • Thumbnail for Hair ornaments
    Hair ornaments

    This image shows a variety of golden or gilt hair ornaments in forms popular with women of the elite class in the Qing dynasty. Floral imagery and images of phoenixes are common. Other materials present include coral and kingfisher feathers.

  • Thumbnail for Manchu shoe  - top view
    Manchu shoe - top view

    Embroidered shoe worn by a female member of the Manchu ethnicity during the Qing era. As a rule, Manchu women did not bind their feet.

  • Thumbnail for Small black shoes
    Small black shoes

    Shoes for bound feet approximately 3 inches in length.

  • Thumbnail for Red Bridal Outfit
    Red Bridal Outfit

    This garment would be worn at a wedding, and carries the auspicious 'double happiness' character in the center. Red is common for wedding gowns in China historically since it is considered a lucky color.

  • Thumbnail for Coin sword
    Coin sword

    Sword made of coins threaded onto a string. Said to have been hung over the cots of newborn babies to ward off evil spirits.

  • Thumbnail for Embroidered wall hanging
    Embroidered wall hanging

    Embroidered wall hanging depicting a wish for successful completion of the civil service exams.

  • Thumbnail for Large porcelain dish
    Large porcelain dish

    The decoration on this blue and white charger was inspired by Islamic ceramics of the 16th and 17th centuries and influenced the decorative patterns used on 18th century Dutch Delft wares. 14 7/8 inches wide; 2.25 inches high.

  • Thumbnail for Porcelain saucer dish
    Porcelain saucer dish

    This doucai enameled shallow dish is decorated on the interior with a central lappet roundel within double circle borders; the exterior depicts three cranes, emblematic of longevity amongst cloud scrolls and fungus. The base is inscribed with a Yongzheng (1723-1735) reign mark and is of the period, however the quality of the enameling and porcelain suggest that it was not intended for the Imperial household. 1 7/16 inches high x 7 1/16 inches wide.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze oviform vase and hexagonal stand - bottom view
    Bronze oviform vase and hexagonal stand - bottom view

    This solidly cast, evenly patinated simple form recalls the subtlety of Song Dynasty ceramics, themselves, a revival of delicate archaic forms seen in ancient bronzes and pottery. This shape also is seen in varying forms in Ming and Qing Dynasty Imperial porcelains and the attached openwork fret-pattern hexagonal stand is a common early Qing embellishment found in both bronze vessels and porcelain.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze rice measure
    Bronze rice measure

    This rectangular tapering vessel is an example of the everyday, utilitarian objects that were fashioned in mold cast bronze in the 18th century. The decoration, which incorporates neatly finished human figures in genre scenes along with typical decorative border embellishments, no doubt was fashioned for use in an important household, rather than for use in a less grand setting. 3 3/4in. high, 5 1/2in wide.

  • Thumbnail for Large porcelain dish - detail of bottom
    Large porcelain dish - detail of bottom

    The decoration on this blue and white charger was inspired by Islamic ceramics of the 16th and 17th centuries and influenced the decorative patterns used on 18th century Dutch Delft wares.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze rice measure - side view
    Bronze rice measure - side view

    This rectangular tapering vessel is an example of the everyday, utilitarian objects that were fashioned in mold cast bronze in the 18th century. The decoration, which incorporates neatly finished human figures in genre scenes along with typical decorative border embellishments, no doubt was fashioned for use in an important household, rather than for use in a less grand setting. 3 3/4in. high, 5 1/2in wide.

  • Thumbnail for Figures in a Garden
    Figures in a Garden by Qian, Hui'an

    Chinese hanging scroll with vertically-oriented painting; ink and colors on paper; image area 39.4 cm x 142.8 cm; brocade frame, mounted on paper with flush roller and brocade ends; subject bearded sage with staff, possibly Confucius or Lao Tzu, and woman standing on a bridge; calligraphy and seal.

  • Thumbnail for Tang Yin portrait, close-up of figure
    Tang Yin portrait, close-up of figure by Signed 'Tang Yin'

    Chinese vertical scroll painting, likely a forgery; colors on silk, brocade frame mounted on paper, flush roller with brocade ends; image area 20.4 cm x 55.8 cm; subject Chang Hsien the archer, patron of child-bearing; birth of male child announced by hanging bow at door or gate, calligraphy, five seals. The subject matter does not match the artist’s inscription. Tang Yin is very well known for his versatility, including calligraphy, figures, and landscapes. He was also known for his literary talents and free-spirited lifestyle. His artistic reputation is reflected in many writings, including novels and dramas in later eras and his love of women is depicted in the performing arts and popular culture. Tang Yin was known as a commercial painter who sold his works and took commissions. Many of the extant works that bear his signature are forgeries. The artist of this painting displays a unique manner in his brushwork, with angular and edgy outlines that reflect the influence of Zhou Chen (still alive in the 1530s), another famous painter of Tang Yin’s era. Tang Yin originally studied painting with Zhou Chen, however Zhou Chen occasionally ghost-painted for Tang Yin due to the huge demand for Tang’s paintings. Another possibility is that the inscription of this painting was done by Tang Yin and the figure was done by Zhou Chen.

  • Thumbnail for Gilt bronze pin
    Gilt bronze pin

    This intricate and beautifully detailed applique comprising three overlapping circular dragon discs could have been an adornment on a court or military dress or perhaps an attachment for a horse trapping. 1 inch high by 3 inches wide.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze ritual vessel gu
    Bronze ritual vessel gu

    In the same tradition as the preceding object, this well cast archaistic revival vessel is decorated with the requisite zoomorphic design employing the use of taotie masks and classical leiwen background pattern. The solidly defined flanges and the three registers of decorative spaces (upper, central and lower) reflect the metal smith’s attention to the strict orthodoxy of ancient bronze decoration. College of Wooster records show several Chinese characters are painted on the inside face of flanges. One legible character is "shou", which means longevity. Over these characters are four others in red - the first is "Song" for the dynasty, the fourth means "recorded", and the second may be "liang", meaning good in quality. 16 inches high x 7.75 wide; base of 4.75 inches.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze oviform vase and hexagonal stand
    Bronze oviform vase and hexagonal stand

    This solidly cast, evenly patinated simple form recalls the subtlety of Song Dynasty ceramics, themselves, a revival of delicate archaic forms seen in ancient bronzes and pottery. This shape also is seen in varying forms in Ming and Qing Dynasty Imperial porcelains and the attached openwork fret-pattern hexagonal stand is a common early Qing embellishment found in both bronze vessels and porcelain. 19.25 inches in height x 9.5 width.

  • Thumbnail for Shallow porcelain saucer dish - detail of side
    Shallow porcelain saucer dish - detail of side

    This doucai enameled dish is decorated with maidens in a terrace garden scene within a border of pine, prunus and bamboo, the “three friends of winterâ€. These plants are emblematic of longevity, as each hearty growth survives the cold, harsh winter months. The dish is inscribed on the base with an apocryphal Ming Dynasty Zhenghua (1465-1487) reign mark, but the decoration, enamel technique and subject matter are clearly 18th century.