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  • Thumbnail for Sandalwood Smoke, Manchuria -- Fumees De Santal. Mandchoukuo
    Sandalwood Smoke, Manchuria -- Fumees De Santal. Mandchoukuo by Paul Jacoulet (1896-1960)

    Woodblock print in ink and colors on paper. Size: paper: 14.25" x 18.75"; image: 11.75" x 15.5". Image of Chinese woman leaning over a railing inhaling incense smoke. French, active in Japan,Jacoulet came to Japan from his native France with his parents when he was ten. He produced very fine Japanese-style prints and his work is widely appreciated by collectors and scholars of modern Japanese printmaking.

  • Thumbnail for Group of Japanese Netsuke
    Group of Japanese Netsuke

    All are carved and stained ivory. Some are okimono (small sculptures made to look like netsuke but lacking the holes netsuke have for tying strings through them).

  • Thumbnail for Souvenir of Mexico
    Souvenir of Mexico by Sekino Junichirō (1914-1988)

    Woodblock print in ink and colors on paper. 16 3/4" x 13 3/4". Signed in pencil in Roman letters: Jun Sekino. Depicts a stylized toy bird.

  • Thumbnail for Bingata (Okinawan resist dyed kimono)
    Bingata (Okinawan resist dyed kimono) by Sekino Junichirō (1914-1988)

    Woodblock print in ink and colors on paper. Signed in pencil in Roman letters: Jun Sekino, with edition number 125/128.Sekino taught printmaking at Oregon State University briefly, in 1963. The forest depicted may be in Oregon.

  • Thumbnail for Wandering Buddhist Priest – Korea -- Le Bonze Errant Corée
    Wandering Buddhist Priest – Korea -- Le Bonze Errant Corée by Paul Jacoulet (1896-1960)

    French, active in Japan. Woodblock print in ink and colors on paper. Size: 17.875" x 14.25"; image: 15.5" x 11.875".

  • Thumbnail for From the series: A Collection of Famous Restaurants of Modern Times
    From the series: A Collection of Famous Restaurants of Modern Times by Utagawa Kunisada (Toyokuni III, 1786-1864) and Utagawa Hiroshige 1797-1858)

    In the upper rectangle: Kinoeneya Restaurant at Mukojima-mazaki. In the main section: Koshiro in the role of Soroku in the play Go-taiheiki Shiroishi-banashi Woodblock print in ink and colors on paper. Vertical ōban size. Signatures: Toyokuni ga, Hiroshige Publisher: Fujiokaya Keijiro These prints have a landscape and still-life by Hiroshige above, and below is an actor in a stage role by Kunisada.

  • Thumbnail for Pair of Roof Brackets
    Pair of Roof Brackets

    From South India,teak wood. 26†x 3.5†x 9.5â€

  • Thumbnail for Looking as if She Wants to Change: The Appearance of a Proprietess of the Kaei era (1848-1854) (Kaita-so: Kaei nenkan o kamisan no fuzoku)
    Looking as if She Wants to Change: The Appearance of a Proprietess of the Kaei era (1848-1854) (Kaita-so: Kaei nenkan o kamisan no fuzoku) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839-1892)

    # 18 from the series: Thirty-two Aspects of Customs and Manners (Fuzoku sanjuniso). Woodblock print in ink and colors on paper. Vertical ōban size. This image is a nice, but not great, later printing. Reference: John Stevenson, Yoshitoshi's Women: The Woodblock Print Series "Fuzoku Sanjuni so." Boulder, CO: Avery Press, 1986; reprinted in 1995 in association with the University of Washington Press.

  • Thumbnail for Actor Ichikawa Komazo as a Samurai
    Actor Ichikawa Komazo as a Samurai by Katsukawa Shunko (1743-1812)

    image size: 11.75" x 5.25". Woodblock print in ink and colors on paper. Condition is very faded; framed behind glass. Vertical hosoban size. This print comes from a group of six prints of similar style and size, all acquired from T.Z. Shiota in San Francisco between 1961 and 1966. They all portray famous Kabuki actors in roles from Kabuki plays. This print is distinguished from the others because impressed on its surface is a round red seal reading "Hayashi Tada," which is the seal of one of the earliest Japanese Ukiyo-e print dealers to sell prints in Paris, Hayashi Tadamasa (1853-1906).

  • Thumbnail for Pine Tree with Birds and Flowers
    Pine Tree with Birds and Flowers by Anonymous artist of the Kano school

    Single six-panel screen. Ink, colors, and gold leaf on paper. 68" x 132.5". Although the artist is unidentified, there is a single jar-shaped seal, with the characters effaced, impressed on the right side. This shape seal is typically used by artists of the Kano school. This attribution concurs with the style of the painting, which is typical of Kano-school artists. Normally screens are made in pairs, so this one is missing its mate. The presence of the seal on the right side, as well as the composition (with the pine tree on the right and body of water on the left) suggest this is the right side of a pair. One of the most interesting features of this painting is the appearance of black underdrawing outlines of flowers adjacent to the white flowers, composed of thickly applied pigment, on the second panel from the right. These flowers were never meant to be visible in the finished painting. Their outlines were preliminary design features created by the artist in the process of sketching out his composition and then covered over by the gold leaf. Over time, the ink has bled through the gold which once obscured them. Painting has undergone restoration twice, in the 1920s and again in 1974.

  • Thumbnail for Embroidered Bridal Shawl from the Swat Region of Pakistan
    Embroidered Bridal Shawl from the Swat Region of Pakistan

    Silk embroidered cotton with applied border and metallic threads 42.5†x 78

  • Thumbnail for Happiness Grows
    Happiness Grows by Fukazawa Yukio, born 1924

    Collagraph with etching and aquatint. 19.5" x 16.75". Information found on the internet notes that Fukazawa Yukio was born in Yamanashi Prefecture. In 1948 Fukazawa graduated from the Tokyo Art College. In the 50s and 60s the young artist gained the attention of the Japanese art community and later in the 70s of an International audience. The favorite medium of Yukio Fukazawa are copper engravings. The artist is the head of the Japan Print Association (JPA). Art critics describe his works as lyrical prints. His prints are in the collections of renowned museums like the New York Modern Art Museum and the Tokyo National Museum of Modern Art

  • Thumbnail for Trees in Snowy Forest
    Trees in Snowy Forest by Sekino Junichirō (1914-1988)

    Woodblock print in ink and colors on paper. Signed in pencil in Roman letters: Jun Sekino, with edition number: 132/182.

  • Thumbnail for Embroidered Sindhi shawl with mirrors
    Embroidered Sindhi shawl with mirrors

    Possibly a table runner, produced in the late 19th-early 20th century and purchased in the 1950s or 1960s. 23†x 86.5â€.

  • Thumbnail for Buddhist Relief with Bowl Bearers
    Buddhist Relief with Bowl Bearers

    From the Gandhara region, dated 3rd – 4th century CE. Gray schist, 7.625" x 7.25".

  • Thumbnail for One Hundred Images of the Buddha Amida
    One Hundred Images of the Buddha Amida by Anonymous

    Woodblock print in ink on paper; 17.5" x 12". This remarkable object from Jōruriji temple, Kyoto Prefecture, represents multiple stamped woodblock images of Amida, the Buddha of the Western Paradise, whose popularity as an object of devotion in Japan had begun to surge from around the year 1000. It so closely resembles other sheets of similar images that were found inside the central Buddha statue at the temple of Jōruriji, in the mountains between Kyoto and Nara, that it must also come from that group. The statue has been recently dated to the second half of the 11th century and the prints are generally considered to have been made at that time. The sheets were discovered when the statue was restored early in the twentieth century. Many were sold off. They all contain images in ten horizontal rows of ten column length. In this one, although there are only nine rows, the edges of a damaged left column of images are visible. Most, like this one, are made from a single block of nearly identical images. This repetition of images allowed the sheets to be filled faster, and it was believed that the more sheets a devotee filled, the more spiritual merit s/he received. Although the execution of the printing is unsophisticated, compositionally the images create an elegant religious aura. For a discussion of this set and pictures of other, very similar prints from this set, see: John M. Rosenfield and Shūjirō Shimada, Traditions of Japanese Art: Selections from the Kimiko and John Powers Collection. Cambridge, MA: Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University, 1970, plate 28, pp. 68-69. See also Miyeko Murase, ed. The Written Image: Japanese Calligraphy and Painting from the Sylvan Barnet and William Burto Collection. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art and New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002, pp. 84-85.

  • Thumbnail for Portrait of Prince Shōtoku (Shōtoku Taishi) with His Younger Brother and Son
    Portrait of Prince Shōtoku (Shōtoku Taishi) with His Younger Brother and Son by Anonymous

    Hanging scroll; ink, gold, and colors on silk. 70" x 26 1/2". Stored in paulownia wood (kiri) box. Prince Shōtoku (Shōtoku Taishi or Imperial Prince of Holy Virtue; 574-622) is regarded by later admirers as Japan's first great imperial statesman, the founding father of Buddhism in Japan, and the human incarnation of assorted Buddhist deities and distinguished monks. Belief in the interrelated nature of these accomplishments assured his leap to the status of mythic hero. This painting is a later version of a very famous, iconic portrait of Prince Shōtoku and his brother and son wearing Chinese-style court robes, dating to the late 7th or early 8th century and owned by the Imperial Household Agency. Paintings such as this and the cult with which they are associated came about in part because of the successful promotion of Prince Shōtoku by those with a vested interest in perpetuating the lineage of the imperial family by portraying its members as national heroes. Ironically, although power struggles within the imperial family shortly after Prince Shōtoku's death wrested authority away from his direct heirs, the usurpers could not undo the mythologizing of the Prince that elevated him to divine status.

  • Thumbnail for Six of the Thirty-six Immortal Poets - Henjo Yoshimine Munesada, one of the six
    Six of the Thirty-six Immortal Poets - Henjo Yoshimine Munesada, one of the six by Anonymous artist of the Tosa school

    Six framed pictures (once pages from an album with pictures of all 36 poets); ink and light colors on paper decorated with yaki-e (burned designs). Each 8 1/2" x 6". The artist of these paintings trained in the style of the Tosa school, an esteemed artistic lineage founded in the early Muromachi era (1392-1568) that painted both secular and religious-themed pictures for the emperor and other aristocratic families. These paintings though, were painted by an emulator of that lineage for affluent, well-educated merchant patrons who had, from the 18th century, had begun to appreciate Japan's ancient courtly artistic and literary heritage. Romantic and nostalgic poetry in Japanese was highly admired among ancient Japanese aristocrats. They particularly favored handwritten anthologies of poetry by thirty-six celebrated poets, who since the 11h century, had been designated as the “Immortal Poets,†and a special compilation of these poets’ works was produced. Compilations of their work came to include one poem by each Immortal Poet, a short biography, and, as in these pictures, an imaginary portrait.

  • Thumbnail for Head of a Buddha or Bodhisattva
    Head of a Buddha or Bodhisattva

    Portion of image created in the Gandhara Region. Gray schist, Height: 7"

  • Thumbnail for Ogura nazarae hyakunin isshū (Ogura imitation of the hundred poets), # 2 in the series: Empress Jitō (645-702)
    Ogura nazarae hyakunin isshū (Ogura imitation of the hundred poets), # 2 in the series: Empress Jitō (645-702) by Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1797-1861)

    Woodblock print; ink and colors on paper. Vertical ōban size. Signature: Ichiyusai Kuniyoshi ga. Scene: Saimyo-ji “Tokiaki†(monk) and Shiratae (woman: name of joro). Censor seal: Kinugasa; publisher: Ibaya Sensaburo; carver: chōkō Fusajirō [Matsushima Fusajirō]. The artist of this print was one of the most prolific and popular of the late Edo period Ukiyo-e printmakers active in Edo (Tokyo). He specialized in prints of warriors, historical tales, landscapes, and geisha, often, as in this print from a big series, collaborating with other printmakers.

  • Thumbnail for Head of a Buddha
    Head of a Buddha

    Gilt bronze. H: 3 1/2"

  • Thumbnail for Dish with Design of a Duck in Water
    Dish with Design of a Duck in Water

    Seto ware stoneware with cream colored glaze, underglaze iron oxide and cobalt blue. Diameter: 10.75" Potters at Seto kilns near the city of Nagoya operated the most commercially successful pottery industry in pre-modern Japan. In the medieval era, they caterd to elite consumers, producing fine glazed wares for everyday use and for the tea ceremony. By the time this plate was made in the 18th century, Seto potters had turned to the mass production of everyday tableware for commercial establishments and for the households of commoners. The deftly-brushed duck and waves on this plate are characteristic of Seto plate designs. Although a mingei (folk art) product, the fluid drawing reveals the hand of a master decorator.

  • Thumbnail for Vase with Stylized Flowers and Phoenix Design
    Vase with Stylized Flowers and Phoenix Design

    Cloisonne enamels over metal base. H: 7 1/". Brightly-colored vessels such as this were made for export to the West where they found great favor with collectors.

  • Thumbnail for Charger Decorated with Floral Motifs
    Charger Decorated with Floral Motifs

    Arita ware porcelain with overglaze enamels, underglaze blue, and gold. Diameter: 12 1/2". Porcelains made in Arita are known by various names according to their dating and decorative schemes. Those ornamented exclusively with underglaze cobalt blue, the first porcelains made in Japan, are generally known as Imari, the name for the port city from which some of them were exported to Europe. Those with brightly colored overglaze enamel colors are generally known as Arita wares. Their production required special technical knowledge garnered from China. This fine bowl is adorned with brightly-colored chrysanthemum flowers and graceful, scrolling leaf vines articulated in kinrande (gold brocade decoration). This bowl was created during the 18th century, when Japanese artisans had refined and naturalized Chinese decorative schemes.

  • Thumbnail for Embroidered Sindhi table covering
    Embroidered Sindhi table covering

    55†x 73.5â€