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  • Thumbnail for Two Balinese Shadow Puppets
    Two Balinese Shadow Puppets

    Height: 50 cm Material: Gilt wood; one wearing silk shot through with gold over cotton petticoats, the other wearing a cotton dress. Balinese puppets came from the small island of Bali. “They are made of painted leather or wood and adorned with splendid garments, mantles, diadems, necklaces...their expressions are either ecstatic or demonic...These figures represent jinn, demons, heroes, and divinities from Indian mythology and legend†(Encyclopedia of World Art). The Bali puppets at Beeghly Library are not the flat-leather puppets (of wayang-kulit) which performed before screens, but are wayang-golek, “a completely rounded wooden figure that was developed in Java, it is less powerful because it is more photographic†(McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Art).

  • Thumbnail for Kashmiri Illustrated manuscript about Vishnu (and his Krishna incarnation) (illustration)
    Kashmiri Illustrated manuscript about Vishnu (and his Krishna incarnation) (illustration)

    Book manuscript; ink, colors, and gold on paper. Ohio State University Professor Susan Huntington notes that this is probably a 19th century piece. She notes that it is actually a very nice example with later paintings and manuscripts just now gaining favor compared with older materials.

  • Thumbnail for Khmer Head of a Divinity
    Khmer Head of a Divinity

    Angkor Wat style; sandstone; 10 1/2in. (27cm.) high. The characteristic detail and sensitivity of Khmer religious stone carving emerges in the facial features and intricate hairstyle of this fragment. With its face firmly set and framed within its hairlines, the image is at the same time both powerful and serene.

  • Thumbnail for Unknown - Japanese woodblock print
    Unknown - Japanese woodblock print by Yoshida Toshi (1911-1995)

    Edition: 117/150 Woodblock print; ink, colors, and silver on paper. Born in Tokyo in 1911, Toshi Yoshida was the eldest son of Hiroshi Yoshida. Under his father's influence, Toshi began to learn painting at age 3 and woodblock printing at age 13. From 1925-29 he studied oil painting at Taiheiyo Art School and in 1929 traveled with his father to India and Southeast Asia. In 1936 Toshi journeyed to China and Korea. In 1952-53 he visited the US and Europe where he exhibited works and lectured about woodblock prints. In 1954 he taught printmaking for one month at the Art Institute of Chicago and since that time has often traveled to the US, Canada, Mexico, Africa, Australia and Antarctica for sketching, exhibitions and lectures. For a few years after the war, he made prints of abstract subjects, but then reverted to prints of scenery and animals. In 1980, Toshi opened the Miasa Cultural Center in Nagano Prefecture where he taught students from many countries, including Carol Jessen and Karyn Young.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese table (top surface)
    Chinese table (top surface) by Designed by Carl F. Kupfer, and made by Chinese students at Chinkiang Institute.

    Size: Height: 78.5 cm, length of the table-top: 118.5 cm, width of the table top: 71 cm. Material: Teakwood, Black Lacquer, and Mother of Pearl. The table was designed by Carl F. Kupfer. It was made of teakwood, black lacquer, and mother of pearl by Chinese students at Chinkiang Institute (a mission station) in 1899. No nails were used in its construction. The table is similar to one located in the Baldwin Wallace College Chapel. Both tables have the bishops’ likenesses and Chinese motifs. In the central rectangle of this table, there are figures representing the Board of Bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church; at the corners of the rectangle, four small squares contain the likenesses of S. L. Baldwin, W. T. Smith, A. B. Leonard, and A. L. Palmer.

  • Thumbnail for Indian Text Written on Palm Leaves entitled: Rahasya (Mystery) (leaves spread out)
    Indian Text Written on Palm Leaves entitled: Rahasya (Mystery) (leaves spread out)

    Width: 37 cm. Material: wood and green palm leaves; housed in a silk-covered hammered metal cylinder Date of text, 18th century; container possibly Chinese made later to house this document. This Sanskrit text is entitled “Rahasya†or Mystery and it is ascribed to Brahma. The Mystery contains religious legends. The Mystery is written on palm leaves in Grantham characters. The palm leaves were allowed to yellow to make the written characters more visible.

  • Thumbnail for Korean amulets and chatelaines (8)
    Korean amulets and chatelaines (8)

    These are interesting pedagogically in discussions of Asian shamanism but need further study.

  • Thumbnail for Ladder
    Ladder by Kim Lim (1936-1997)

    Intaglio print on paper. British sculptor and printmaker of Chinese birth. She grew up in Singapore and at the age of 18 decided to go to London to study at Saint Martin’s School of Art (1954–6) where she took a particular interest in wood-carving; she then transferred to the Slade School of Art, where she concentrated on printmaking, graduating in 1960. Whilst at college she often travelled through Asia and Europe en route back to Singapore, with Indian and South-East Asian sculpture and spirituality making a great impact on her work. While Lim always acknowledged a debt to the work of Constantin Brancusi in her simplification and abstraction of forms, it is in her concern for the specific qualties of materials, as in her use of charred wood to create contrast, that the influence of Eastern spirituality and concepts of balance can be seen. In 1960 she married the painter and sculptor William Turnbull, settling in London but continuing to travel widely. In the 1960s and 1970s her sculptures were mainly carved from wood, using forms inspired by basic rhythmic forms and structures, with each element forming a balanced whole. Her prints from this time also explore these modulations, as in the etchings Set of Eight (1975; see 1995 exh. cat., pp. 24 and 28), which consist of simple patterns of blocks and lines.

  • Thumbnail for Mura - 'Village' - building 1
    Mura - 'Village' - building 1 by Inagaki Nenjiro (1902-1963)

    Portfolio of 20 woodblock prints; ink and light colors on paper. Born Kyoto. Alt. name: Inagaki Nenjiro. Graduated in 1922 Kyoto City School of Fine Arts and Crafts. Became a designer of stencil patterns for fine kimonos. Exhibited in craft divisions of Bunten and Kokugakai from 1941. Held several positions at Kyoto City College of Fine Arts. His work as a stencil-dyed fabric designer was designated an Intangible Cultural Property in 1962. In the 1950s he designed multicolor hanga which have the stylized quality of his textile designs but were printed from single woodblocks at Mikumo Mokuhansha in Kyoto. This company had been founded by Ishihara Tadao in January 1942. It still exists today. The prints in the OWU collection are characteristic of Inagaki's works of the 1950s that resemble his textile designs.

  • Thumbnail for Mura - 'Village' - figures working 2
    Mura - 'Village' - figures working 2 by Inagaki Nenjiro (1902-1963)

    Portfolio of 20 woodblock prints; ink and light colors on paper. Born Kyoto. Alt. name: Inagaki Nenjir_. Grad. 1922 Kyoto City School of Fine Arts and Crafts. Became a designer of stencil patterns for fine kimonos. Exhibited in craft divisions of Bunten and Kokugakai from 1941. Held several positions at Kyoto City College of Fine Arts. His work as a stencil-dyed fabric designer was designated an Intangible Cultural Property in 1962. In the 1950s he designed multicolor hanga which have the stylized quality of his textile designs but were printed from single woodblocks at Mikumo Mokuhansha in Kyoto. This company had been founded by Ishihara Tadao in January 1942. It still exists today. The prints in the OWU collection are characteristic of Inagaki's works of the 1950s that resemble his textile designs.

  • Thumbnail for Indian Text Written on Palm Leaves entitled: Rahasya (Mystery) (leaves in tube)
    Indian Text Written on Palm Leaves entitled: Rahasya (Mystery) (leaves in tube)

    Width: 37 cm. Material: wood and green palm leaves; housed in a silk-covered hammered metal cylinder Date of text, 18th century; container possibly Chinese-made later to house this document. This Sanskrit text is entitled “Rahasya†or Mystery and it is ascribed to Brahma. The Mystery contains religious legends. The Mystery is written on palm leaves in Grantham characters. The palm leaves were allowed to yellow to make the written characters more visible.

  • Thumbnail for Korean Meiping (plum shaped) vase with celadon glaze
    Korean Meiping (plum shaped) vase with celadon glaze

    Size: Height: 27 ½ cm. A letter from the donor is preserved and states that “The choicest article in the box (of items he sent to the library) is a celadon vase of the rare old Korean pottery, for hundreds of years only to be had from desecration of the royal tombs in which this ware had been buried with the bodies of departed dignitaries who had died prior to some five hundred years ago. This particular piece came from a royal tomb looted by Japanese.â€

  • Thumbnail for Korean amulets and chatelaines (7)
    Korean amulets and chatelaines (7)

    These are interesting pedagogically in discussions of Asian shamanism but need further study.

  • Thumbnail for Korean amulets and chatelaines (6)
    Korean amulets and chatelaines (6)

    These are interesting pedagogically in discussions of Asian shamanism but need further study.

  • Thumbnail for Mura - 'Village' - plants 2
    Mura - 'Village' - plants 2 by Inagaki Nenjiro (1902-1963)

    Portfolio of 20 woodblock prints; ink and light colors on paper. Born Kyoto. Alt. name: Inagaki Nenjiro. Graduated in 1922 Kyoto City School of Fine Arts and Crafts. Became a designer of stencil patterns for fine kimonos. Exhibited in craft divisions of Bunten and Kokugakai from 1941. Held several positions at Kyoto City College of Fine Arts. His work as a stencil-dyed fabric designer was designated an Intangible Cultural Property in 1962. In the 1950s he designed multicolor hanga which have the stylized quality of his textile designs but were printed from single woodblocks at Mikumo Mokuhansha in Kyoto. This company had been founded by Ishihara Tadao in January 1942. It still exists today. The prints in the OWU collection are characteristic of Inagaki's works of the 1950s that resemble his textile designs.

  • Thumbnail for Clock Tower on Street Corner of Washington D.C.
    Clock Tower on Street Corner of Washington D.C. by Hiratsuka Un'ichi (1895-1997)

    Woodblock print; ink on paper, framed under glass. Hiratsuka, one of the preeminent figures in the sosaku hanga movement, was born in Matsue, Honshû. In 1913 he met the artist Ishii Hakutei (1882-1958), a western-style painter and printmaker who had published the first sosaku hanga print (Yamamoto Kanae's "Fisherman") in the magazine Myôjô in 1904. Ishii admired Hiratsuka's painting, and in 1915 the younger artist moved to Tokyo to continue his study with Ishii, who urged him to learn block carving and printing. He did so for about six months with Igami Bonkotsu (1875-1933), becoming the best-trained block carver in the sosaku hanga movement. Hiratsuka exhibited his first prints in 1916 at an exhibition of the independent Nika-kai ("Second Division Society"), and by the 1920s his reputation in the world of printmaking was considerable. It is likely that Hiratsuka had some influence upon nearly every important sosaku hanga artist. He taught sessions on woodblock printing in various parts of Japan, inspiring, among many students, the great Munakata Shiko, who learned to use the v-shaped chisel from Hiratsuka when they first met in 1928. Between 1935 and 1944 Hiratsuka taught the first blockprinting course at the Tokyo School of Fine Arts (Kitaoka Fumio and Hashimoto Oike were among his students). In 1948 he established his own school in Tokyo. He moved to Washington D.C. in 1962, but ultimately returned to Japan in 1994. Hiratsuka was awarded the Order of Cultural Merit by the Japanese government in 1970, and in 1991, the Hiratsuka Un'ichi Print Museum was opened in Suzaka, Nagano Prefecture.

  • Thumbnail for Korean amulets and chatelaines (5)
    Korean amulets and chatelaines (5)

    These are interesting pedagogically in discussions of Asian shamanism but need further study.

  • Thumbnail for Kaki (Persimmons)
    Kaki (Persimmons) by Tomoe Yokoi (born 1943)

    Mezzotint; ink and colors on paper, framed under glass. Tomoe Yokoi was born in Nagoya Japan in 1943. She began art studies at Bunk Tokyo College of Art, were the curriculum was traditional techniques. Subject matter stressed was realistic everyday images such as fruits, musical instruments, and flowers. In 1964, following graduation, Yokoi moved to Paris, and studied intaglio printmaking with S. W. Hayter as this famous workshop, Atelier. In Paris Yokoi perfected her technique of mezzotint, expanding its parameters to include more complex images and subtle color nuances. In 1971 Yokoi moved to New York City where she worked and introduced her art to New York audiences. She developed a unique style which combines and is a synthesis of her Japanese, Parisian, and New York experiences.

  • Thumbnail for Portrait of Thoreau
    Portrait of Thoreau by Matsubara Naoko (born 1937)

    Edition: 45/100. Woodblock print; ink on paper.This is a fine, interesting work by this woman artist, indicative of modern Japanese artist-intellectuals' interest in Western philosophers. Born in Tokushima, on the island of Shikoku, Matsubara Naoko grew up mostly in the city of Kyoto. Her father was one of the most senior Shinto priests in Japan, and her mother came from a very old Shinto family. After graduating from the Kyoto Academy of Fine Arts (now Kyoto Fine Arts University), she went to the United States as a Fulbright scholar, spending a year at the Carnegie Institute of Art (now Carnegie Mellon University) in Pittsburgh, where she received her MFA.

  • Thumbnail for Stone and Sand
    Stone and Sand by Hagiwara Hideo (born 1913)

    Edition: 9/30. Woodblock print; ink, colors, and silver on paper. Hideo Hagiwara was born in Kofu City, Yamanishi Prefecture. Between 1921 and 1929 he lived in Korea and Manchuria. He studied at the Tokyo School of Fine Arts, where he graduated at the Oil Painting Section in 1938. While still there he attended Un'ichi Hiratsuka's extracurricular woodblock printing course, and in the same year he became quality controller at the Takamizawa Woodblock Print Company. He was conscripted into the army in 1943. In 1945 he had lost his house, his atelier and nearly all his early works. Around 1950 he had sufficiently recovered to start painting again. At the same time he started making Sosaku hanga (creative prints), both figurative and abstract subjects. He is known as a constant innovator and he is generally considered one of the best post-WWII Sosaku hanga artists.

  • Thumbnail for Blue Engraving
    Blue Engraving by Kim Lim (1936-1997)

    Intaglio print on paper. British sculptor and printmaker of Chinese birth. She grew up in Singapore and at the age of 18 decided to go to London to study at Saint Martin’s School of Art (1954–6) where she took a particular interest in wood-carving; she then transferred to the Slade School of Art, where she concentrated on printmaking, graduating in 1960. Whilst at college she often travelled through Asia and Europe en route back to Singapore, with Indian and South-East Asian sculpture and spirituality making a great impact on her work. While Lim always acknowledged a debt to the work of Constantin Brancusi in her simplification and abstraction of forms, it is in her concern for the specific qualties of materials, as in her use of charred wood to create contrast, that the influence of Eastern spirituality and concepts of balance can be seen. In 1960 she married the painter and sculptor William Turnbull, settling in London but continuing to travel widely. In the 1960s and 1970s her sculptures were mainly carved from wood, using forms inspired by basic rhythmic forms and structures, with each element forming a balanced whole. Her prints from this time also explore these modulations, as in the etchings Set of Eight (1975; see 1995 exh. cat., pp. 24 and 28), which consist of simple patterns of blocks and lines.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese double gourd shape miniature vase with design of figures in courtly garb lined up for a festival procession (side 2)
    Japanese double gourd shape miniature vase with design of figures in courtly garb lined up for a festival procession (side 2)

    Height: 12 cm. This is a very fine quality piece of Satsuma-style ware made for export to the West in the late 19th century, a time when Japan was avidly promoting production of such wares to expand their economy internationally. The piece does not have the Satsuma mark, and hence should not be defined as "Satsuma ware" proper, but was made at a high quality kiln that imitated this popular export ware product. Probably from a kiln in Kyoto, Osaka, or Tokyo.

  • Thumbnail for Kashmiri Illustrated manuscript about Vishnu (and his Krishna incarnation) (text 1)
    Kashmiri Illustrated manuscript about Vishnu (and his Krishna incarnation) (text 1)

    Book manuscript; ink, colors, and gold on paper. Ohio State University Professor Susan Huntington notes that this is probably a 19th century piece. She notes that it is actually a very nice example with later paintings and manuscripts just now gaining favor compared with the older materials.

  • Thumbnail for Two Thai pots (pot 1)
    Two Thai pots (pot 1)

    Allegedly from the ancient Thailand site of Ban Chiang. Painted earthenware. When this archaeological site was discovered in the 1960s, it predated the earliest known bronze age site in Thailand, and southeast Asian prehistory was rewritten. Ban Chiang was occupied for over 2000 years prior to the Common Era and its accidental discovery pushed the date of civilization in southeast Asia back nearly two millennia. Ban Chiang is a UNESCO World Heritage Area site, considered the most important prehistoric settlement so far discovered in South-East Asia. It marks an important stage in human cultural, social and technological evolution during the prehistoric era in Southeast Asia 3600 BCE - 200 CE.

  • Thumbnail for Korean amulets and chatelaines (2)
    Korean amulets and chatelaines (2)

    These are interesting pedagogically in discussions of Asian shamanism but need further study.