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  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Dedication of the Cenotaph, 1952.
    Hiroshima: Dedication of the Cenotaph, 1952. by Photo courtesy of Chugoku Shimbun, the Chugoku newspaper

    On August 6, 1952, seven years after the bombing of Hiroshima, five war orphans unveiled the cenotaph for the victims of the A-bomb blast. It is known as the Memorial Monument for Hiroshima, City of Peace. Approximately 1,000 persons attended the unveiling ceremony. Each year, on August 6, the memorial service is held in front of this monument located in the Peace Memorial Park. In this photo from 1952, one can still see private houses that had been rebuilt after the war in the area that is now the Peace Park.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Ceremony at the Cenotaph, August 6, 1952.
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Ceremony at the Cenotaph, August 6, 1952.

    Each year on the anniversary of the A-bomb explosion, a memorial ceremony is held in front of the cenotaph. The stone crypt in the cenotaph is opened each year and the names of persons who have died in the previous year from bomb related illnesses are added the the register of names kept in the crypt. This photo shows family members crowding around the crypt, hands clasped in prayer, on August 6, 1952. The annual ceremony continues to this day. It is estimated that approximately 340,000 persons were exposed to the A-bomb blast on August 6, 1945. By the end of December, 1945, 140,000 persons had died, either from the blast or from radiation illness. On August 6, 2004, the number of names of victims enshrined in the Cenotaph was 237,062, having swollen to that number over time because of the slow development of some forms of radiation caused illnesses, such as some forms of cancer. (This photograph, now in the Peace Memorial Museum, was provided courtesy of the Chugoku Shimbun ne

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 02 -- "Help my Daddy and Mommy!"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 02 -- "Help my Daddy and Mommy!" by Onoyama, Hiroko

    Help my Daddy and Mommy! -- Explanation by the artist: "A boy not yet of school age was standing on a crumbled pile of roof tiles shouting, 'My Daddy and Mommy are under here! Somebody help them!' A little baby on his back was crying. but no one could help that young boy." The scene depicted was 1200 meters from the hypocenter, near the Takanobashi Streetcar Stop. Hiroko Onoyama, the artist, was 23 at the time of the bombing, 80 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 01 –-  “Injured, like creatures from another worldâ€
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 01 –- “Injured, like creatures from another world†by Yoshimura, Kichisuke

    Explanation by the artist: “Covered with blood, trudging silently away like ghosts from the city, the injured looked like creatures from another world.†The scene depicted was 4,000 meters from the hypocenter, near the current Yaga 5-chome, at about 10:00 am, August 6, 1945. The artist, Kichisuke Yoshimura, was 18 years old at the time of the bombing, 75 when he did this drawing. -- The drawings presented in this group of images, “Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors,†were photographed in November, 2005, in the gallery area of the Museum in Hiroshima. They were part of an exhibition that rotates annually, presenting drawings created by survivors of the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima. -- A sign at the entrance to the exhibition space introduces us to the drawings on display. Quoting the sign, “ This exhibit displays drawings by A-bomb survivors. A drawing by a survivor in 1974 inspired Hiroshima Station of NHK (Japan’s public TV and radio network) to invite