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Browsing 265 results for facet Temporal (Time) with value of 2003-01.
  • Thumbnail for Auspicious figures on door lintel
    Auspicious figures on door lintel

    Carved auspicious figures frame the entranceways to several of the caves. These figures include amorous couples, apsaras and gandharvas, and leaping horses. These figures associate the caves with good fortune.

  • Thumbnail for Bodhisattva figure
    Bodhisattva figure

    Bodhisattva figures adorn the outer walls of the caves. These bodhisattva figures represent the ideal of leaving one's family, wealth, and social standing to take up the life of a wandering Buddhist mendicant seeking enlightenment

  • Thumbnail for Buddha in seated lotus position, behind unadorned rectangular doorway
    Buddha in seated lotus position, behind unadorned rectangular doorway

    This Buddha figure, seated in the lotus position, is an early sculpture demonstrating the dharmacakra mudra, the hand gesture of teaching. A traditional depiction of the Buddha Sakyamuni as Teacher.

  • Thumbnail for Khuldabad, Aurangzeb Mosque minarets
    Khuldabad, Aurangzeb Mosque minarets

    The speakers visible in this photo are used to announce the call to prayer.

  • Thumbnail for Aurangzeb Mosque, entranceway and view from outside
    Aurangzeb Mosque, entranceway and view from outside

    The yellow gate area marks the entrance into the mosque and tomb of the Emporor Aurangzeb. Stalls selling various religious goods line the passage leading into mosque. Worshippers can buy plaques inscribed with Qur'anic passages, scale models and photographs of religious shrines, scarves, prayer caps (topis), and books, among other religious goods. The sign "STD, ISD" designates a long distance telephone booth.

  • Thumbnail for Ellora Buddhist Caves, school field trip
    Ellora Buddhist Caves, school field trip

    The Ellora Caves are a popular site for school field trips. Students learn the history of the early religious communities who lived in this area as they walk through the caves and observe the figures and symbols.

  • Thumbnail for Ellora Hindu Caves, wedding of Shiva and Parvati
    Ellora Hindu Caves, wedding of Shiva and Parvati

    Shiva takes Parvati's hand to lead her around the sacred fire to solemnize their wedding. Attending the ceremony are dozens of celestial apsaras and gandharvas to dance and sing, as well as Brahma and Vishnu at Shiva's left. The couple standing next to Parvati may be her parents, Himalaya and Meena.

  • Thumbnail for Zar Zari Zar Baksh Dargah Entrance
    Zar Zari Zar Baksh Dargah Entrance

    The patron saint of this popular dargah, Muntajib al-Din, known best by his epithet Zar Zari Zar Baksh, is said to have come to this area of the Deccan in the fourteenth century at the request of his teacher, Nizamuddin Awliya of Delhi. The Zar Zari Zar Baksh Dargah in Khuldabad attracts hundreds of pilgrims each year for ordinary rituals such as seeking the blessings of prayer at a holy place. But to commemorate the urs, or death anniversary, of the saint, thousands of pilgrims travel great distances to participate in this celebration which is immediately followed by the commemoration of the death of the Prophet Muhammad.

  • Thumbnail for Zar Zari Zar Baksh tomb entrance
    Zar Zari Zar Baksh tomb entrance

    The doorway opens into a closed circular room housing a sarcophagus to represent the tomb of the saint, Zar Zari Zar Baksh. A domed roof covers this tomb shrine. Men enter this room and pray next to the tomb while women pray at the doorway. Both men and women are touched with a peacock feather on each shoulder as a symbol of the blessings received by all who pray at this site.

  • Thumbnail for Kailash Cave Temple, Gandharva
    Kailash Cave Temple, Gandharva

    This carving of a gandharva or celestial musician on an outside wall behind the main part of the temple appears to be attached to the wall with a post. This depiction makes the gandharva appear to be flying in mid-air, an appropriate pose for a celestial musician not bound by the gravity of earth.

  • Thumbnail for Kailash Cave Temple, entrance
    Kailash Cave Temple, entrance

    In the 8th and 9th centuries CE, the Kailash Cave Temple was carved out of the volcanic rock that formed countless plateaus in the western ghats (small mountain range), part of the geological formation known as the Deccan Plateau. Part of a group of 34 caves carved into the side of this plateau, Kailash, cave number 16, is monumental by any standards. The Kailash rock-cut temple stands 30 meters (99 feet) high, 52 meters (170 feet) in length, and 33 meters (108 feet) wide. The other 33 caves, Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain, were created by digging into the side of the plateau much like other cave dwellings, but Kailash appears to have been literally excavated from the top in order to create a free-standing temple encircled by smaller cave shrines.

  • Thumbnail for Ellora Buddhist Caves, Teen Tal, close up
    Ellora Buddhist Caves, Teen Tal, close up

    Buddhist monks lived in small room on the upper levels of this vihara, or monastery.

  • Thumbnail for Bhajan singing 1
    Bhajan singing 1

    Singers from the Rama Temple in Ellora sing devotional songs (bhajans) to Rama, Krishna, and other Vaishnava deities. Accompanying the singers are musicians playing the harmonium, hand cymbals, and drum. As this gathering was on a cool January evening (2003), the singers are wrapped in woolen scarves and sweaters.

  • Thumbnail for Bhajan singing 3
    Bhajan singing 3

    As noted in Bhajan singing 1 and 2, the warmly dressed singers from the Rama Temple are singing songs of praise to Vaishnava deities. Women and men sing together in these groups.

  • Thumbnail for Zar Zari Zar Baksh Dargah, ritual of thanksgiving for child, child sitting in the balance
    Zar Zari Zar Baksh Dargah, ritual of thanksgiving for child, child sitting in the balance

    This child in her finest dress and blud scarf sits patiently in the metal crate of the balance as she is weighed against the bags of sweetbreads to be distributed to the community. Following a custom widely practiced in all religious communities in South Asia, the girl, as the primary participant in the ritual, wears a garland of fresh flowers.

  • Thumbnail for Kailash Cave Temple, Bhagiratha's Penance
    Kailash Cave Temple, Bhagiratha's Penance

    This wall sculpture tells the story of Bhagiratha who practiced penance for eons to purify the sins of his ancestors.

  • Thumbnail for Kailash Cave Temple, Mata Ganga
    Kailash Cave Temple, Mata Ganga

    Mata Ganga stands in this shrine niche on top of her vahana, the makara. A representation of the River Ganga, she stands next to two other river goddesses, Yamuna and Saraswati.

  • Thumbnail for Khuldabad, dome of the Aurangzeb Mosque
    Khuldabad, dome of the Aurangzeb Mosque

    A staunchly religious man, Aurangzeb enforced Sharia law for all, forbidding drinking and gambling in his realm, and reinstating the hated jizya tax on non-Muslims.

  • Thumbnail for Zar Zari Zar Baksh Dargah Mosque
    Zar Zari Zar Baksh Dargah Mosque

    Within the inner courtyard of the dargah, just oustide the tomb of the saint, is a mosque where men pray five times a day. This mehrab marks the direction of Mecca, the direction faced during prayer. On the two plates above the mehrab, on either side of the clock, are written the names of the two most revered figures in Sufi practice, Muhammad and Ali. Written in gold underneath the clock is the credal statement, the shahada, "There is no god but God, and Muhammad is the messenger of God."

  • Thumbnail for Khuldabad fairies' tank, pariyon ka talab
    Khuldabad fairies' tank, pariyon ka talab

    The Jalal al-Din Dargah overlooks this spring-fed pond which is understood to have miraculous healing properties. In particular, people with mental illnesses drink and touch this water hoping to regain their health.

  • Thumbnail for Ellora, Jain Caves, Yaksha Elephant detail
    Ellora, Jain Caves, Yaksha Elephant detail

    Held in the trunk of the elephant is a lotus symboliizing spiritual pursuits and a gentle nature. Placing this lotus in the trunk of this wild and powerful beast, the sculptor may be commenting on the greater power of the Jain practice of non-violence toward all creatures.

  • Thumbnail for Ellora, Datta Temple, silver makara
    Ellora, Datta Temple, silver makara

    On a pillar of the temple is this gray makara, a mythical aquatic beast associated with the Ganges gharial, a species of crocodile. The makara is associated with Kamadeva, god of desire, as well as the goddess Ganga and the Vedic god of the sea, Varuna.

  • Thumbnail for Ellora, Ganapati Temple, archway entrance
    Ellora, Ganapati Temple, archway entrance

    This archway marks the entrance to the Ganapati Temple grounds: A holy temple to Shri Vinayaka Ganapati.

  • Thumbnail for Ellora, Jain Caves, Yaksha's elephant seat
    Ellora, Jain Caves, Yaksha's elephant seat

    The yaksha guardian, Matanga, sits on a grand elephant who has knelt to offer his back as a seat for the yaksha. The sculptor has placed a lotus bud in the trunk of the elephant to show his docile nature in the presence of this yaksha protector.

  • Thumbnail for Ellora, Ganapati Temple, puja with flowers
    Ellora, Ganapati Temple, puja with flowers

    Performing puja to the deity, Ganapathy, the priest and a worshipper offer flowers.