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  • Thumbnail for Commencement Program 2002
    Commencement Program 2002 by Colorado College

    Program of Colorado College Class of 2002 Commencement ceremony, May 20, 2002, Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colorado. CC President Kathryn Mohrman presiding. Commencement speaker, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, C.S. and D.J. Davidson Professor, Peter F. Drucker School of Management, Claremont Graduate University, "The True Bottom Line."

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 02 -- "Help my Daddy and Mommy!"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 02 -- "Help my Daddy and Mommy!" by Onoyama, Hiroko

    Help my Daddy and Mommy! -- Explanation by the artist: "A boy not yet of school age was standing on a crumbled pile of roof tiles shouting, 'My Daddy and Mommy are under here! Somebody help them!' A little baby on his back was crying. but no one could help that young boy." The scene depicted was 1200 meters from the hypocenter, near the Takanobashi Streetcar Stop. Hiroko Onoyama, the artist, was 23 at the time of the bombing, 80 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 01 –-  “Injured, like creatures from another worldâ€
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 01 –- “Injured, like creatures from another world†by Yoshimura, Kichisuke

    Explanation by the artist: “Covered with blood, trudging silently away like ghosts from the city, the injured looked like creatures from another world.†The scene depicted was 4,000 meters from the hypocenter, near the current Yaga 5-chome, at about 10:00 am, August 6, 1945. The artist, Kichisuke Yoshimura, was 18 years old at the time of the bombing, 75 when he did this drawing. -- The drawings presented in this group of images, “Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors,†were photographed in November, 2005, in the gallery area of the Museum in Hiroshima. They were part of an exhibition that rotates annually, presenting drawings created by survivors of the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima. -- A sign at the entrance to the exhibition space introduces us to the drawings on display. Quoting the sign, “ This exhibit displays drawings by A-bomb survivors. A drawing by a survivor in 1974 inspired Hiroshima Station of NHK (Japan’s public TV and radio network) to invite

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 08  --  "Water! Water, please!"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 08 -- "Water! Water, please!" by Sato, Yasuko

    Water! Water, please! -- Explanation by the Artist: -- "'Water! Water! Water!' Voices reverberated through the brick building. I was told, 'get their names and addresses,' so I went around asking them. Some moved their mouths but I couldn't hear what they said. Some were already dead. One answered clearly. 'I'm Hitoshi Miyake. first year, Class 1, First Hiroshima Prefectural Junior High School.' A little later I went back to see him and Hitoshi was dead, too. Thinking about how he must have felt, I felt compelled to report his death to his family. On my way home, I found his house and told them. His parents just cried and cried." -- The scene depicted was 2,670 meters from the hypocenter, Hiroshima Army clothing Depot, Deshio-cho (now, Deshio-cho 2-chome). The artist was 17 at the time of the bombing, 74 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Noh
    Noh

    The actor Umewaka Rokuro leads a busy life, reviving ancient Noh plays, presenting new Noh productions and performing overseas.

  • Thumbnail for 2002 The nugget
    2002 The nugget

    The Colorado College yearbook, published 1900-2007, was known as The Pikes Peak Nugget from 1900-1941 and The Nugget or Colorado College Nugget afterward. Year on cover differs from title page in some years.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 04  --   " Father appearing from under the roof tiles holding my sister".
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 04 -- " Father appearing from under the roof tiles holding my sister". by Kanachika, Mamoru

    Father appearing from under the roof tiles holding my sister -- Explanation by Artist: "My father, my younger sister and I were completely buried under our collapsed house. My mother ran half-crazed around the house calling our names but got no answer. I don't know how much time passed, but at one point the roof tiles began to rattle and move. Then father, holding me under one arm and my sister under another, appeared at the surface. He looked like Nio, the guard of heaven. My mother always said that she was never happier before or since." The scene depicted was 1,300 meters from the hypocenter, tenme-cho. Artist was 2 at the time of the bombing, 59 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 18  --  "A line of burned lunchboxes"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 18 -- "A line of burned lunchboxes" by Takeuchi, Isamu

    A line of burned lunchboxes, Art -- Exlpanation by the artist: buriedAfter morning assembly, they were probably doing calisthenics. They seemed to be junior high students. I wonder where the owners of these lunchboxes were, laid out so neatly. Because this drill ground was near the hypocenter, the lost lunchboxes were burned but still retained their shape, which makes my heart ache. Thinking of the kindness and love some mother put into each, for them to become last lunches. . . -- 360 m from the hypocenter, Western Drill Ground, Moto-machi. The artist was 25 at the time of the bombing, 82 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 13  --  "A-bombed woman searching for family."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 13 -- "A-bombed woman searching for family." by Akashi, Masanobu

    A-bombed woman searching for family. -- Expalnation by the Artist: " An A-bombed woman searching for her family west entrance, Hiroshima Station." The scene depicted was 1,900 meters fro the hypocenter, west entrance of Hiroshima Station, Matsubara-cho. Artist was 19 at the time of the bombing, 76 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 15  --  "Searching"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 15 -- "Searching" by Takeuchi, Isamu

    Searching -- Explanation by the artist: "Bodies lined up along the road for pick-up." The artist was 25 at the time of the bombing, 82 at the time when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for La tertulia [2002-2003 v. 18 no. 3 Fall]
    La tertulia [2002-2003 v. 18 no. 3 Fall] by Colorado College. Dept. of Southwest Studies

    La Tertulia is the newsletter of the Hulbert Center for Southwest Studies of the Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 22  --  "Finding a husband by his leather belt"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 22 -- "Finding a husband by his leather belt" by Ogasawara, Shodo

    Finding a husband by his leather belturvivo -- Explanation by the artist: his leA woman (perhaps 34 or 35) with a baby on her back brought what seemed to be her mother-in-law, a woman of about 60, to the place where bodies were being kept. She had spent two days searching the city fruitlessly for her husband. All of the bodies were black from soot and dirt and terribly swollen. 'This leather belt is definitely my husband's. The face is also similar. I'm sure it's him.' A reunion of tears. -- 1290m from the hypocenter, on the grounds of Sumiyoshi Shrine, Kako-machi (now Sumiyoshi-cho). The artist was 17 at the time of the bombing, 74 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 16  --  "Searching for mother among the straw mats"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 16 -- "Searching for mother among the straw mats" by Kuwamoto, Katsuko

    Searching for mother among the straw mats -- Explanation by the artist: "My mother, who lived in HIroshima, was missing so my aunt and I (I was 6 years old), who had been at an evacuation site, went to the riverbank near Misasa. We searched for her under the straw mats covering the many people who had breathed their last on the riverbank. One face was swollen reddish copper, but was still white around the eyes (probably where glasses had reflected the heat ray). Under the mid-summer sun, the stench was unbearable." -- The artist was 6 at the time of the bombing, 63 at the time when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 06  --   " Parents and crying child, wandering aimlessly.
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 06 -- " Parents and crying child, wandering aimlessly. by Abe, Hatsuko

    Parents and crying child wandering aimlessly -- Explanation by Artist: " My husband's skin peeled off because of the burn. I held my babywith a broken arm. Blood covered our heads and faces. Skin from our faces and our arms dangled. Barefoot, clothes torn to shreds. "Don't cry. Don't cry. When your cry, I get sad." "Waahhh! Waahhh! (give me the breast)" " I haven't eaten since morning. My milk has dried up. Poor thing." "Waa, Waa." Artist was 24 at the time of the bombing, 81 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 03  --  "I couldn't get my grandmother out"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 03 -- "I couldn't get my grandmother out" by Yamada, Ichiro

    I couldn't get my grandmother out -- Explanation by Artist: "I am running away from my grandmother without answering her. I had only a second to get out. There was nothing I could do. I wish at least I has answered her. It's so sad I never wanted to tell anyone this story. There is no way to atone for this sin." Artist was 18 at the time of the bombing, 75 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Street Scene
    Street Scene

    Pedestrians clad in winter coats walk the streets. A pair of bright yellow street cars bedecked with garlands stand in the background.

  • Thumbnail for Heroic Mountain God
    Heroic Mountain God

    Nakamura Kantaro, a 20 year old kabuki actor, plays a heroic mountain god with supernatural powers in Momiji-gari. Kabuki, Japan's most famous classical theatre, has a history of about 400 years. It began as a women's dance routine (kabuki odori), but soon evolved into stage plays, with men taking all of the acting roles. Kabuki acting techniques are passed from father to son, and so techniques tend to remain within a limited number of acting families. Each family becomes the custodian of certain acting roles, and these roles, too, are passed from one generation to the next.

  • Thumbnail for Common data set [2002-2003]
    Common data set [2002-2003] by Colorado College. Office of Institutional Research

    The Common Data Set is a standardized compilation of descriptive elements created by publishers and data providers in the higher education community to meet the external needs of the community through standard reporting. Institutions annually submit data in the standard form of the Common Data Set and have access to each other's data for comparative purposes. The CDS includes data on enrollment and persistence, admissions, academic offerings and policies, student life, tuition and fees, financial aid, faculty and class size, and degrees conferred.

  • Thumbnail for La tertulia [2001-2002 v. 18 no. 1 Winter]
    La tertulia [2001-2002 v. 18 no. 1 Winter] by Colorado College. Dept. of Southwest Studies

    La Tertulia is the newsletter of the Hulbert Center for Southwest Studies of the Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for La tertulia [2001-2002 v. 18 no. 2 Spring]
    La tertulia [2001-2002 v. 18 no. 2 Spring] by Colorado College. Dept. of Southwest Studies

    La Tertulia is the newsletter of the Hulbert Center for Southwest Studies of the Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for East Asian Ceramics:  Then and Now, 02  Oribe-ware Box.
    East Asian Ceramics: Then and Now, 02 Oribe-ware Box. by Higashida Shigemasa

    This is a contemporary ceramic object with a fluid green glaze that pools and catches on the texture of the surface, creating a strongly accented surface that is related directly to form and the process by which the piece was formed. The color, the "accidental" flow of the glaze across the heavily textured surface, the white glaze that is said to cover the inside of the piece, and the casual irregularity of the form, are all references to the style of historic Oribe-ware. -- Roger L. Watson and Margaret Dornbusch funds, 2005.52 -- [A parenthetic observation: photographs and images of works of art can be very misleading. This box, in fact, is perhaps 6 or 7 inches long, yet, in this image, it could easily be mistaken as being a much larger sculptural object. Without something to indicate scale, it may be very difficult to judge the actual size of an art object from an image of the object.]

  • Thumbnail for Mukkuri
    Mukkuri

    Traditional instrument of the Ainu people of Hokkaido. Sound is made by pulling on strings attached to a thin bamboo board. The mouth is used to add resonance.

  • Thumbnail for Rampei Monogurui
    Rampei Monogurui

    One scene in Rampei Monogurui (Rampei Goes Insane). Here the main character, Rampei (played by Onoe Shoroku), fights with his enemies. Traditionally, Kabuki skills are passed from older members of a family of actors to the younger members, down through the generations. But in 1969, the National Theater established the Kabuki Actor Taining Center to teach aspiring performers from outside the Kabuki world as well. The training program lasts two years and is free. A few participants join every second year, and after they graduate, they are eligible for a role on the Kabuki stage. Almost all of the actors shown here graduated from the Kabuki Actor Training Center.

  • Thumbnail for Kyogen
    Kyogen

    Top: Shigeyama Motohiko (left) and his brother Ippei in a short kyogen play. Kyogen is Japan's oldest form of spoken drama. It is closely associated with the Noh theater and was originally performed during the intervals between the acts of a Noh play. While Noh themes are often serious, kyogen presents a comical view of everyday situations, making it easier to enjoy. Lower: The folding fan : an important prop on the kyogen stage.

  • Thumbnail for Kabuki Woman
    Kabuki Woman

    Nakamura Kantaro, a 20 year old kabuki actor, plays a woman in the play Sannin Kichisa.