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8 hits

  • Thumbnail for Bronze vessel (detail)
    Bronze vessel (detail)

    In ancient Japan (prior to the Meiji era, 1868-1912), metalwork was solely for swords and Buddhist statues. During the Meiji era, a decree abolishing sword-wearing and the restoration of Shintoism, the original religion of Japan, as the national religion caused the making of metalwork to shift to objects for export and home consumption; the functions of objects and subject of decoration tended to be secular. This vase, designed with a style of Chinese bronze vessel, bears 8 different scenes on the entire body. There are four large panels, with subjects ranging from figurative to seascapes, on the main body of the vessel, and four small horizontal scenes, landscapes and seascapes are the subjects (possibly a display of the four seasons), on the bottom. The designs are done in relief. The borders of the panels are also ornamented with plant patterns, chrysanthemums and gingko tree leaves in particular common Japanese floral motif. A great deal of artistic appeal and distinctive styles are the trademark of Meiji metalwork.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze vessel
    Bronze vessel

    In ancient Japan (prior to the Meiji era, 1868-1912), metalwork was solely for swords and Buddhist statues. During the Meiji era, a decree abolishing sword-wearing and the restoration of Shintoism, the original religion of Japan, as the national religion caused the making of metalwork to shift to objects for export and home consumption; the functions of objects and subject of decoration tended to be secular. This vase, designed with a style of Chinese bronze vessel, bears 8 different scenes on the entire body. There are four large panels, with subjects ranging from figurative to seascapes, on the main body of the vessel, and four small horizontal scenes, landscapes and seascapes are the subjects (possibly a display of the four seasons), on the bottom. The designs are done in relief. The borders of the panels are also ornamented with plant patterns, chrysanthemums and gingko tree leaves in particular common Japanese floral motif. A great deal of artistic appeal and distinctive styles are the trademark of Meiji metalwork.

  • Thumbnail for Woman’s skirt
    Woman’s skirt

    In all respects (cut, design, embroidered designs), these two garments are typical of the late 19th – early 20th century feminine fashions. The skirt is an example of one way such garments were fastened around the waist – by placing fabric loops over cloth buttons. A lithographed print by the late 19th century Shanghai artist Wu Youru depicts two women wearing such garments posing in a photographer’s studio.

  • Thumbnail for Pair of ancestor portraits (male)
    Pair of ancestor portraits (male)

    Dating from the late 19th or early 20th century, these two ancestor paintings are typical of the genre. The individuals are in formal poses and each wears formal clothing. He wears formal court dress; she is shown in wedding finery, including an elaborate crown and a red robe. Both have rank badges on the front of their garments. Women were denied any role in officialdom, but were entitled to wear the rank badge of their husband. In the late nineteenth century it was customary for the portrait of the wife to be placed at the right side of that of her husband (on the viewer’s left). The use of shading on the faces indicates the influence of Western art and most likely that of photography. The cranes depicted at the bottom of the portraits are symbols of longevity.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze vessel (handle detail)
    Bronze vessel (handle detail)

    In ancient Japan (prior to the Meiji era, 1868-1912), metalwork was solely for swords and Buddhist statues. During the Meiji era, a decree abolishing sword-wearing and the restoration of Shintoism, the original religion of Japan, as the national religion caused the making of metalwork to shift to objects for export and home consumption; the functions of objects and subject of decoration tended to be secular. This vase, designed with a style of Chinese bronze vessel, bears 8 different scenes on the entire body. There are four large panels, with subjects ranging from figurative to seascapes, on the main body of the vessel, and four small horizontal scenes, landscapes and seascapes are the subjects (possibly a display of the four seasons), on the bottom. The designs are done in relief. The borders of the panels are also ornamented with plant patterns, chrysanthemums and gingko tree leaves in particular common Japanese floral motif. A great deal of artistic appeal and distinctive styles are the trademark of Meiji metalwork.

  • Thumbnail for Woman’s skirt (detail)
    Woman’s skirt (detail)

    In all respects (cut, design, embroidered designs), these two garments are typical of the late 19th – early 20th century feminine fashions. The skirt is an example of one way such garments were fastened around the waist – by placing fabric loops over cloth buttons. A lithographed print by the late 19th century Shanghai artist Wu Youru depicts two women wearing such garments posing in a photographer’s studio.

  • Thumbnail for Pair of ancestor portraits (female)
    Pair of ancestor portraits (female)

    Dating from the late 19th or early 20th century, these two ancestor paintings are typical of the genre. The individuals are in formal poses and each wears formal clothing. He wears formal court dress; she is shown in wedding finery, including an elaborate crown and a red robe. Both have rank badges on the front of their garments. Women were denied any role in officialdom, but were entitled to wear the rank badge of their husband. In the late nineteenth century it was customary for the portrait of the wife to be placed at the right side of that of her husband (on the viewer’s left). The use of shading on the faces indicates the influence of Western art and most likely that of photography. The cranes depicted at the bottom of the portraits are symbols of longevity.

  • Thumbnail for Silver box
    Silver box

    Design of the lotus and sacred "swans" (hamas) based on carved moonstones located at the entrances of ancient Buddhist monuments in Sri Lanka. Swans are organized in the direction of ritual circumambulation around the central lotus. Possibly made for retail sale.