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  • Thumbnail for Standing female figure wearing skirt and headdress
    Standing female figure wearing skirt and headdress

    Wood-carved with added white paint. This handsome figure is another Manderman folk piece. She seems to most closely resemble what are often called bhuta figures from 19th-20th-century Karnataka. Bhuta is another term that is used in various ways; in the orthodox tradition it has meaning associated with ghosts, with evil forces, with potentially malevolent spirits. Bhuta has been used as a term to signify those malevolent spritis outside the orthodox traditions of Hinduism and thus has also come to signifiy, more generically, folk deities, powerful forces outside the pantheon of the Hindu tradition; but in this sense these are not necessarily malevolent or destructive; rather they are beings/ forces/ spirits of limited and often highly localized powers. What this figure shares with other Karnataka figures that have been termed bhutas are the material and general form: she is made of wood, rather simply carved, with a strongly stylized, geometric body. Her body is contructed of a series of geometric shapes, with tubular arms, a cylindrical trunk pinched at the waist, her face strongly circular with large ears that project at a direct perpendicular from the cheeks. The details of the face are simplified in a manner that is shared with the marble Jina. There are several details that set this figure apart from better-known so-called bhutas from Karnataka: she seems to wear a garment that covers her upper body, a feature quite unusual in the depiction of females in Indian art in general and in typical bhutas from Karnataka, in which the upper body is also usually nude except for jewelry; her skirt falls in wide gores with only a few folds, while in most bhuta figures from Karnataka the skirt is rendered in a continuous series of thin folds that create a more detailed pattern of vertical forms along the lower body; and rarely are typical Karnataka bhutas painted, as this figure is. Further research may suggest a different provenance, as wooden 'folk' figures hail from many regions.

  • Thumbnail for Offering Pitcher with Feathers
    Offering Pitcher with Feathers by Unknown

    Pitcher: 4-3/8 (H) x 1-7/8 (dia); feather top: 14-1/2 (L) x 3-1/4 (W) inches. Brass vase-shaped Bumpa or offering pitcher with a flat lozenge design pierced overhanging rim and a high matched pierced foot with a long tapering spout. A long copper stopper fitted with peacock feathers and a grass filler sits into the top of the pitcher and functions as a sprinkler for the consecrated water.

  • Thumbnail for Standing female figure wearing skirt and headdress - back view
    Standing female figure wearing skirt and headdress - back view

    Wood-carved with added white paint. This handsome figure is another Manderman folk piece. She seems to most closely resemble what are often called bhuta figures from 19th-20th-century Karnataka. Bhuta is another term that is used in various ways; in the orthodox tradition it has meaning associated with ghosts, with evil forces, with potentially malevolent spirits. Bhuta has been used as a term to signify those malevolent spritis outside the orthodox traditions of Hinduism and thus has also come to signifiy, more generically, folk deities, powerful forces outside the pantheon of the Hindu tradition; but in this sense these are not necessarily malevolent or destructive; rather they are beings/ forces/ spirits of limited and often highly localized powers. What this figure shares with other Karnataka figures that have been termed bhutas are the material and general form: she is made of wood, rather simply carved, with a strongly stylized, geometric body. Her body is contructed of a series of geometric shapes, with tubular arms, a cylindrical trunk pinched at the waist, her face strongly circular with large ears that project at a direct perpendicular from the cheeks. The details of the face are simplified in a manner that is shared with the marble Jina. There are several details that set this figure apart from better-known so-called bhutas from Karnataka: she seems to wear a garment that covers her upper body, a feature quite unusual in the depiction of females in Indian art in general and in typical bhutas from Karnataka, in which the upper body is also usually nude except for jewelry; her skirt falls in wide gores with only a few folds, while in most bhuta figures from Karnataka the skirt is rendered in a continuous series of thin folds that create a more detailed pattern of vertical forms along the lower body; and rarely are typical Karnataka bhutas painted, as this figure is. Further research may suggest a different provenance, as wooden 'folk' figures hail from many regions.

  • Thumbnail for Horn and Silver Snuff Bottle
    Horn and Silver Snuff Bottle by Unknown

    1-7/8 inches (W) x 2-3/4 (H). Snuff bottle, horn with silver mounts set with various,gemstones.

  • Thumbnail for Standing female figure wearing skirt and headdress - closeup view
    Standing female figure wearing skirt and headdress - closeup view

    Wood-carved with added white paint.This handsome figure is another Manderman folk piece. She seems to most closely resemble what are often called bhuta figures from 19th-20th-century Karnataka. Bhuta is another term that is used in various ways; in the orthodox tradition it has meaning associated with ghosts, with evil forces, with potentially malevolent spirits. Bhuta has been used as a term to signify those malevolent spritis outside the orthodox traditions of Hinduism and thus has also come to signifiy, more generically, folk deities, powerful forces outside the pantheon of the Hindu tradition; but in this sense these are not necessarily malevolent or destructive; rather they are beings/ forces/ spirits of limited and often highly localized powers. What this figure shares with other Karnataka figures that have been termed bhutas are the material and general form: she is made of wood, rather simply carved, with a strongly stylized, geometric body. Her body is contructed of a series of geometric shapes, with tubular arms, a cylindrical trunk pinched at the waist, her face strongly circular with large ears that project at a direct perpendicular from the cheeks. The details of the face are simplified in a manner that is shared with the marble Jina. There are several details that set this figure apart from better-known so-called bhutas from Karnataka: she seems to wear a garment that covers her upper body, a feature quite unusual in the depiction of females in Indian art in general and in typical bhutas from Karnataka, in which the upper body is also usually nude except for jewelry; her skirt falls in wide gores with only a few folds, while in most bhuta figures from Karnataka the skirt is rendered in a continuous series of thin folds that create a more detailed pattern of vertical forms along the lower body; and rarely are typical Karnataka bhutas painted, as this figure is. Further research may suggest a different provenance, as wooden 'folk' figures hail from many regions.

  • Thumbnail for Hand drum
    Hand drum by Unknown

    23-1/4 (L) x 3-5/8 (Dia. of drum) inches. Double carved wood drum with stretched leather faces, a silver floral ban in the middle inlaid with six turquoise stones and two silver side loops with leather straps ending with wood beads. Decorated with a long macrame knotted red and yellow silk tassel which is attached to a woven silver chain wrapped in red fabric. (This small drum is played by shaking it rapidly so that the bead/clappers hit the drum faces.)

  • Thumbnail for Chopstick and Knife Set
    Chopstick and Knife Set by Unknown

    Chopstick and knife set, wood, with brass mounts, Sino-Tibetan.

  • Thumbnail for Butter Lamp
    Butter Lamp by Unknown

    7-1/2 inches (Dia.) x 3-3/8 (H). Silver butter lamp with removable lid. The large cup divided into two registers by ribbed banding. The upper register, below the flaring rim, is engraved with the Eight sacred Buddhist Symbols and the lower register with lotus flowers alternating with offering bowls. The cup sits on a high pedestal base consisting of a scrolling lotus and SHOU medallion bead above an elongated lotus petal base with two rows of lotus petals above a plain cone foot finished with a stylized vegetable design at the bottom. The plain lid has three coin cut-outs and is fitted with a small silver hat shield which is attached to the open center rim hole and has thin silver tube for the wick.

  • Thumbnail for Bell with Vajra Handle
    Bell with Vajra Handle by Unknown

    7-3/4 (L) x 3-1/2 (Dia.) inches. Metal bell with a brass handle. The brass handle is composed of a half dorje surmounting the head of a lotus crowned wisdom deity (Yum or Mother) which sits on a lotus flower. The bronze bell has lotus petals on the dome, a band of conch shells with lotus flowers in them and a band of dorje around the rim. The inside has four lotus petals in the dome with some characters (possibly Om ah hum) and a long iron clapper attached to a ring with a piece of white cloth.