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  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 11  --  "Children crying as they looked at the red sky."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 11 -- "Children crying as they looked at the red sky." by Yoneo, Yoshiko

    Children crying as they looked at the red sky. -- Explanation by the Artist: "What? Whose mother is this?" Looking at the crimson sky over Hiroshima and thinking of their parents, evacuated children were sobbing. Eventually, someone's mother arrived at the temple steps looking like an old rag. She described the situation in Hiroshima and spoke the names of other parents she had met. She also told the names of some parents that would never be returning." The scene depicted was 19.5 km from the hypocenter, Obayashi Lecture Center, Obayashi-mura, Asa-gun (now Obayashi Asakita-ku) Artist was 10 at the time of the bombing, 39 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Lioness B
    Lioness B by Yoshida, Toshi (1911-1995)

    Woodblock print, 14.75 x 16.75 inches. Another black and white lioness, with head down on a rock outcropping. This black and white image has been taken from the key block used for the larger, full color woodblock print, Peaceful Wild Animals, 1974, by Toshi. It shows the incredibly fine, detailed carving Toshi was able to do. The lines for the fur, for example, have been carved in the wood in a way that delineates the shape of the muscles in the body and the light reflected off of them. For a carver to do this without additional shading, shows great skill and artistry. The complete full color print shows all three animals together on a rock in the vast African savannah. This extra large print was carved from a single block of cherry wood. St.Olaf College has the entire large black and white key block impression, slightly cropped, in its collection.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 12  --  "Staring dazed at scenes from hell."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 12 -- "Staring dazed at scenes from hell." by Fujise, Asako

    Staring dazed at scenes from hell -- Explanation by the Artist: The atomic flame turned humans into insects, smashing people like ants. Running blindly, severely burned, covered with blood, pathetic people turned insects formed a picture of hell. Precious irreplaceable lives were snuffed out in the flames. Even the rivers were unrecognizable in the burning city of Hiroshima. Truly, a picture of hell. Worried about my relatives, I stared at it all in a daze." -- The scene depicted was 2,000 meters from the hypocenter, Hijiyama Hill (now Hijiyama Park). The artist was 22 at the time of the bombing, 51 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Peaceful Wild Animals
    Peaceful Wild Animals by Yoshida, Toshi (1911-1995)

    24.5 x 37.75 inches. Woodblock print; Black print with lion and 2 lionesses. A lion and two lionesses resting on a rock in the African savanna. This is the black and white keyblock print for a print made in full color with the same title and date. Toshi's carving shows incredible skill in modeling the full bodies of the animals with simple lines. It was carved on one very large cherrywood block. Toshi loved Africa and its wildlife. His seal in the lower right. It is possible to trace Toshi's career as an artist by means of this and other prints. Untitled (Rabbits in Battle), soclaa001040, represents his sketch book drawing when he was 5 years old; Raicho, soclaa001105, with considerable detail was his earliest self-carved and self-printed work at age 19; Peaceful Wild Animals, soclaa001124, one of his largest prints was made when he was 63 years old.

  • Thumbnail for Lion
    Lion by Yoshida, Toshi (1911-1995)

    Woodblock print, 14.75 x 16.75 inches. Black and white lion with large mane, sitting on a rock outcropping. This black and white image has been taken from the key block used for the larger, full color woodblock print, Peaceful Wild Animals, 1974, by Toshi. It shows the incredibly fine, detailed carving Toshi was able to do. The lines for the fur, for example, have been carved in the wood in a way that delineates the shape of the muscles in the body and the light reflected off of them. These three images of African lions and lionesses show the artist's special affection for animal life.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 17  --  "Many names written in charcoal on a wall"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 17 -- "Many names written in charcoal on a wall" by Matsumoro, Kazuo

    Many names written in charcoal on a wall -- Explanation by the artist: "Part of the wall at Takeya Elementary School. The names of missing people were written in charcoal by those looking for them. 'Hisako Nishimura - tell me where your are - Mother' 'Kazuko, come here' 'Toshie Mitsutani is OK' 'Ippei Masuda, Miyoko is OK, going to Mukaihara' 'Father, Mother both OK, come to Hijiyama Gobenden.' " -- 1,280 m from the hypocenter, Takeya Elementary School, Takara-machi. The artist was 32 at the time of the bombing, 61 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for The Good Samaritan
    The Good Samaritan by Sadao Watanabe (1913-1996)

    Kappazuri or katazome dyed stencil print, 39/70, 26 x 22 3/4 inches. Watanabe is, perhaps, the most famous Christian-Japanese print master to date. Frances Blakemore states that "Watanabe's works are in collections from South Africa to Australia, from the Philippines to Europe." (Who's who in Modern Japanese Prints, p. 228). 23 institutions list examples of his work in their collections, including the Museums of Modern Art of Tokyo and New York, the Honolulu Academy of Arts, the British Museum, and the Haifa Museum. Ten of Watanabe's prints are on permanent display in the Vatican Museum of Modern Art. Watanabe also has had shows of his prints in the US, Japan, Brussels, the Netherlands, China, Germany, Denmark, and Indonesia. His work was included into the exhibition of Japanese prints at the Winter Olympics in Sapporo in 1972. Watanabe has won the prizes of the Folk Art Museum, the Japanese Print Association, and other prestigious bodies. He is holder of the coveted prize of the Kokuga sosaku kyokai, the organization that holds the Arts in Spring-Kokuten Exhibition that is such an important event in the world of modern art in Japan. The range in date, subject, and size of these prints means that the Watanabe Collection of the Brauer Museum of Art provides excellent coverage of this key Creative Print master, increasing its value for his study.

  • Thumbnail for Commencement Program 1974
    Commencement Program 1974 by Colorado College

    Program of Colorado College Class of 1974 Commencement ceremony, June 3, 1974, Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colorado.

  • Thumbnail for 1974 The nugget
    1974 The nugget

    The Colorado College yearbook, published 1900-2007, was known as The Pikes Peak Nugget from 1900-1941 and The Nugget or Colorado College Nugget afterward. The Nugget was not published in 1971 and 1973. Year on cover differs from title page in some years.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 05  --  "Fleeing with children from the ferocious fire"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 05 -- "Fleeing with children from the ferocious fire" by Ishizu, Kazuhiro

    Fleeing with children from the ferocious fire 05 - -- Explanation by the Artist: ferociWith the fire licking in ever closer, driven by desparate fear of death, I dug myself out. Buildings on both sides had tumbled into the road. I thought a bomb had exploded right over my head, but the whole city was burning feriously. Nearby I heard a voice screaming in desperate pain, calling for help. A person was trapped under a large tree. He screamed in agony as he burned slowly from the feet up. -- The scene depicted was 1,380 meters from the hypocenter, near Kyobashi Bridge. The artist was 37 at the time of the bombing, 66 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 21  --  "Sister, holding brother grown cold"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 21 -- "Sister, holding brother grown cold" by Tagashira, Tadayuki

    Sister holding brother grown cold -- Explanation by the artist: "This girl went out searching for her younger brother in the morning. About two hours before this picture, she found him. 'I want water! I want water!' he said, so she gave him some. He drank it happily. 'Sister, sister, I'm cold! I'm cold!' he said, so she held him. His body gradually grew colder and colder, then he breathed his last." -- 900m from the hypocenter, in front of the main gate of the Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital. The artist was 43 at the time of the bombing, 72 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Trees in Snowy Forest
    Trees in Snowy Forest by Sekino JunichirĊ (1914-1988)

    Woodblock print in ink and colors on paper. Signed in pencil in Roman letters: Jun Sekino, with edition number: 132/182.

  • Thumbnail for Lioness A
    Lioness A by Yoshida, Toshi (1911-1995)

    Woodblock print, 14.75 x 16.75 inches. Black and white lioness, alert, sitting on a rock outcropping. This black and white image has been taken from the key block used for the larger, full color woodblock print, Peaceful Wild Animals, 1974, by Toshi. It shows the incredibly fine, detailed carving Toshi was able to do. The lines for the fur, for example, have been carved in the wood in a way that delineates the shape of the muscles in the body and the light reflected off of them. While on a trip to Africa in 1974, Toshi was deeply impressed by how the various wild animals got along peacefully with one another in the wild. This, he thought, was a lesson for human beings and he created a series of children's books, African Animal Storybooks, 17 Vols., 1982-1993, to express this.