Colorado College Logo

  DigitalCC

Use AND (in capitals) to search multiple keywords.
Example: harmonica AND cobos

17 hits

  • Thumbnail for Charger - underside with foot
    Charger - underside with foot

    From Sawankhalok, 15th or 16th century with 20th century added decoration. Stoneware, H: 2 5/8" x Dia: 11". Green-glazed wares were among the earliest Chinese ceramics to make their way to Southeast Asia. These celadons were coveted because of the belief that they had magical properties such as the ability to reveal poisonous food. To achieve the green color of celadon, glaze made of wood ash mixed with clay and 2 to 5 per cent iron is applied, then fired in a reduction low oxygen atmosphere; the potter accomplishes this by closing the kiln's intake ports at a precise internal temperature, which is determined by observing the degree of incandescence within the kiln through a peephole. If the timing is off, the glaze will maintain its original whitish color. The resulting colors range from a pale, almost white green to a bright apple green, while the glaze finish ranges from matte to a glassy, reflective surface. Large, shallow plates or chargers were particularly coveted in the islands; they reflect Southeast Asian and Islamic influence, as the large size was suited to communal eating. However, this charger probably never was exported, as it slumped in the kiln and was undoubtedly considered a kiln waster. The plate was originally devoid of decoration, with the design now on the surface having been added in recent years by an unscrupulous dealer to enhance the price of the object. Even in the photograph, you can make out how lines mimicking incisions were drawn on both the exterior and interior. The base elucidates the firing technique, as the circular mark indicates the charger was stacked in the kiln using a disc support, the typical Sawankhalok kiln support used to separate the dishes so the glaze does not adhere them together.

  • Thumbnail for Unglazed jar - bottom view
    Unglazed jar - bottom view

    From Pitsanulok, Sukhothai, or Sawankhalok. Earthenware, H: 12 3/4" x 9". Jars of this type were produced in huge quantities in Sawankhalok, Pitsanulok, and Sukhothai, and it is impossible to distinguish the production of the three centers. In all instances, the clay body is a grey color and the decoration is appliqued and jabbed on to the surface. Unglazed vessels are often used to contain water, as the liquid stays cool, since the vessel body can breath.

  • Thumbnail for Charger
    Charger

    From Sawankhalok, 15th or 16th century with 20th century added decoration. Stoneware, H: 2 5/8" x Dia: 11". Green-glazed wares were among the earliest Chinese ceramics to make their way to Southeast Asia. These celadons were coveted because of the belief that they had magical properties such as the ability to reveal poisonous food. To achieve the green color of celadon, glaze made of wood ash mixed with clay and 2 to 5 per cent iron is applied, then fired in a reduction low oxygen atmosphere; the potter accomplishes this by closing the kiln's intake ports at a precise internal temperature, which is determined by observing the degree of incandescence within the kiln through a peephole. If the timing is off, the glaze will maintain its original whitish color. The resulting colors range from a pale, almost white green to a bright apple green, while the glaze finish ranges from matte to a glassy, reflective surface. Large, shallow plates or chargers were particularly coveted in the islands; they reflect Southeast Asian and Islamic influence, as the large size was suited to communal eating. However, this charger probably never was exported, as it slumped in the kiln and was undoubtedly considered a kiln waster. The plate was originally devoid of decoration, with the design now on the surface having been added in recent years by an unscrupulous dealer to enhance the price of the object. Even in the photograph, you can make out how lines mimicking incisions were drawn on both the exterior and interior. The base elucidates the firing technique, as the circular mark indicates the charger was stacked in the kiln using a disc support, the typical Sawankhalok kiln support used to separate the dishes so the glaze does not adhere them together.

  • Thumbnail for Underglaze bowl - bottom view
    Underglaze bowl - bottom view

    From Sawankhalok. Stoneware, H: 3" x Dia. 7 5/8". Underglaze-iron painting on bowls from Sawankhalok and Sukhothai in Thailand, and in the northern kilns of Vietnam, clearly derives from Chinese Guangdong ceramics, particularly those produced in the kilns of Xicun. A popular motif on both the Sukhothai and the Sawankhalok bowls and plates was a solar whorl or wheel, possibly an allusion to that symbol as it is used in Buddhism, to denote the law or teachings of the Buddha. This solar whorl is visible on the interior base of this bowl. The leaves that are painted on the cavetto of the bowl have been added recently. Thus, although the bowl dates to the period of export, it was tarted up in recent times to increase its value. This is not an uncommon practice for resale in Southeast Asia. Aside from the varnished surface of the piece, it was also possible to ascertain the modern addition by applying a small amount of acetone with a q-tip; the painting lifts off easily. The black impurities typical of Sawankhalok clay are visible on the base of this bowl, the white visible on the base is slip, rather than glaze that was painted on prior to firing. Southeast Asian ceramics are never glazed on the bottom, as opposed to Chinese ceramics, which often have a glazed base.

  • Thumbnail for Underglaze bowl
    Underglaze bowl

    From Sawankhalok, Thailand. Stoneware, H: 3" x Dia. 7 5/8". Underglaze-iron painting on bowls from Sawankhalok and Sukhothai in Thailand, and in the northern kilns of Vietnam, clearly derives from Chinese Guangdong ceramics, particularly those produced in the kilns of Xicun. A popular motif on both the Sukhothai and the Sawankhalok bowls and plates was a solar whorl or wheel, possibly an allusion to that symbol as it is used in Buddhism, to denote the law or teachings of the Buddha. This solar whorl is visible on the interior base of this bowl. The leaves that are painted on the cavetto of the bowl have been added recently. Thus, although the bowl dates to the period of export, it was tarted up in recent times to increase its value. This is not an uncommon practice for resale in Southeast Asia. Aside from the varnished surface of the piece, it was also possible to ascertain the modern addition by applying a small amount of acetone with a q-tip; the painting lifts off easily. The black impurities typical of Sawankhalok clay are visible on the base of this bowl, the white visible on the base is slip, rather than glaze that was painted on prior to firing. Southeast Asian ceramics are never glazed on the bottom, as opposed to Chinese ceramics, which often have a glazed base.

  • Thumbnail for Small storage jar
    Small storage jar

    From Central Thailand. Stoneware, H: 9" x dia.8". Like the large storage jar illustrated here, this vessel, with its buff clay body, is glazed a dark brown on the upper part of the body. The broad lip would have served the same purpose as the lugs on the larger jar, as a cover could have been tied over the broad mouth. These vessels were used both as export ware and for domestic use. A jar of this type would have been thrown in two parts and luted together.

  • Thumbnail for Korean Meiping (plum shaped) vase with celadon glaze
    Korean Meiping (plum shaped) vase with celadon glaze

    Size: Height: 27 ½ cm. A letter from the donor is preserved and states that “The choicest article in the box (of items he sent to the library) is a celadon vase of the rare old Korean pottery, for hundreds of years only to be had from desecration of the royal tombs in which this ware had been buried with the bodies of departed dignitaries who had died prior to some five hundred years ago. This particular piece came from a royal tomb looted by Japanese.â€

  • Thumbnail for Unglazed jar
    Unglazed jar

    From Pitsanulok, Sukhothai, or Sawankhalok. Earthenware, H: 12 3/4" x 9 ". Jars of this type were produced in huge quantities in Sawankhalok, Pitsanulok, and Sukhothai, and it is impossible to distinguish the production of the three centers. In all instances, the clay body is a grey color and the decoration is appliqued and jabbed on to the surface. Unglazed vessels are often used to contain water, as the liquid stays cool, since the vessel body can breath.

  • Thumbnail for Large storage jar
    Large storage jar

    From Singburi. Stoneware, H: 17" x12". This large storage jar has a dark charcoal-colored body and a dark brown glaze that covers the upper half of the broad shoulder. The interior of the vessel is not glazed. Lugs adorn the shoulder and would have served a functional purpose, as a cover could have been tied over the mouth. Jars such as these would have contained products shipped from the mainland to island Southeast Asia. Large storage jars -- containers for honey, fermented fish, and other natural products exported from the mainland -- were kept and reused for centuries, as nineteenth century Westerners descriptions of collections attest. Large jars were made by coiling the clay, then smoothing out the coils with an anvil either a block of wood or a stone. One can see this type of construction still in use in Southeast Asia today.

  • Thumbnail for Underglaze bowl - sideview
    Underglaze bowl - sideview

    Sawankhalok, Thailand. Stoneware, H: 3" x Dia. 7 5/8". Underglaze-iron painting on bowls from Sawankhalok and Sukhothai in Thailand, and in the northern kilns of Vietnam, clearly derives from Chinese Guangdong ceramics, particularly those produced in the kilns of Xicun. A popular motif on both the Sukhothai and the Sawankhalok bowls and plates was a solar whorl or wheel, possibly an allusion to that symbol as it is used in Buddhism, to denote the law or teachings of the Buddha. This solar whorl is visible on the interior base of this bowl. The leaves that are painted on the cavetto of the bowl have been added recently. Thus, although the bowl dates to the period of export, it was tarted up in recent times to increase its value. This is not an uncommon practice for resale in Southeast Asia. Aside from the varnished surface of the piece, it was also possible to ascertain the modern addition by applying a small amount of acetone with a q-tip; the painting lifts off easily. The black impurities typical of Sawankhalok clay are visible on the base of this bowl, the white visible on the base is slip, rather than glaze that was painted on prior to firing. Southeast Asian ceramics are never glazed on the bottom, as opposed to Chinese ceramics, which often have a glazed base.

  • Thumbnail for Small storage jar
    Small storage jar

    From Central Thailand. Stoneware, H: 9" x dia.8". Like the large storage jar illustrated here, this vessel, with its buff clay body, is glazed a dark brown on the upper part of the body. The broad lip would have served the same purpose as the lugs on the larger jar, as a cover could have been tied over the broad mouth. These vessels were used both as export ware and for domestic use. A jar of this type would have been thrown in two parts and luted together.

  • Thumbnail for Jarlet
    Jarlet

    From Sawankhalok. Stoneware, H: 4" x Dia. 2". Small covered boxes and jarlets were exported in huge quantities from the Thai export kilns of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries to island Southeast Asia; their uses can only be imagined possibly for spices, unguents, cosmetics, or some other precious commodity. We do know that they were used in burials, possibly taking the place of larger, more valued ceramics. Since glazed wares were not produced in island Southeast Asia, these objects formed an important part of the import market. Two lugs at the shoulders allow a cover to be tied over the top and also allow for suspension of the jarlet off the ground, away from insects and rodents. Indentations in the body of the jarlet gives it a melon shape. The base is finished and the pale celadon is slightly crackled. Jarlets of this type were also produced by the Chinese, but the Thai jarlets generally are more finely finished with a carefully carved-recessed base. Excavations of burials in the Philippines revealed a ceremonial placement of imported vessels around the body Thai jarlets were placed around the head, Chinese plates were inverted over the pubic area, saucers were placed beneath the hands, and local wares were arranged away from the body. What this arrangement meant will never be known, but it does suggest that a specific symbolic significance was assigned to the various vessels.

  • Thumbnail for Jarlet - bottom view
    Jarlet - bottom view

    From Sawankhalok. Stoneware, 1998.5.9, height 4" x dia.2". By the time the Sawankhalok district kilns stopped production, at least 500 kilns had been built into the banks of the Menam Yom (river), at Tukatha, Ban Pa Yang, and Ban Koh Noi all sited across the river from the ancient capital of Si Satchanalai. Potters working at Ban Koh Noi produced glazed ceramics for local use (called Mon ware by the local peoples) by the thirteenth or fourteenth century and exported goods from all of the sites by the end of the fourteenth century. Numerous jarlets of this type were produced at the various kilns at Si Satchanalai in central Thailand. The glaze is a brown iron glaze and the body typical of Si Satchanalai wares, a buff color with dark impurities. Jarlets of this type were also produced by the Chinese, but the Thai jarlets generally are more finely finished with a carefully carved-recessed base. Excavations of burials in the Philippines revealed a ceremonial placement of imported vessels around the body Thai jarlets were placed around the head, Chinese plates were inverted over the pubic area, saucers were placed beneath the hands, and local wares were arranged away from the body. What this arrangement meant will never be known, but it does suggest that a specific symbolic significance was assigned to the various vessels.

  • Thumbnail for Jarlet
    Jarlet

    From Sawankhalok. Stoneware, 1998.5.9, height 4" x dia.2". By the time the Sawankhalok district kilns stopped production, at least 500 kilns had been built into the banks of the Menam Yom (river), at Tukatha, Ban Pa Yang, and Ban Koh Noi all sited across the river from the ancient capital of Si Satchanalai. Potters working at Ban Koh Noi produced glazed ceramics for local use (called Mon ware by the local peoples) by the thirteenth or fourteenth century and exported goods from all of the sites by the end of the fourteenth century. Numerous jarlets of this type were produced at the various kilns at Si Satchanalai in central Thailand. The glaze is a brown iron glaze and the body typical of Si Satchanalai wares, a buff color with dark impurities. Jarlets of this type were also produced by the Chinese, but the Thai jarlets generally are more finely finished with a carefully carved-recessed base. Excavations of burials in the Philippines revealed a ceremonial placement of imported vessels around the body Thai jarlets were placed around the head, Chinese plates were inverted over the pubic area, saucers were placed beneath the hands, and local wares were arranged away from the body. What this arrangement meant will never be known, but it does suggest that a specific symbolic significance was assigned to the various vessels.

  • Thumbnail for Unglazed jar
    Unglazed jar

    From Pitsanulok, Sukhothai, or Sawankhalok. Earthenware, H: 12 3/4" x 9". Jars of this type were produced in huge quantities in Sawankhalok, Pitsanulok, and Sukhothai, and it is impossible to distinguish the production of the three centers. In all instances, the clay body is a grey color and the decoration is appliqued and jabbed on to the surface. Unglazed vessels are often used to contain water, as the liquid stays cool, since the vessel body can breath.

  • Thumbnail for Charger - top view
    Charger - top view

    From Sawankhalok, 15th or 16th century with 20th century added decoration. Stoneware, H: 2 5/8" x Dia: 11". Green-glazed wares were among the earliest Chinese ceramics to make their way to Southeast Asia. These celadons were coveted because of the belief that they had magical properties such as the ability to reveal poisonous food. To achieve the green color of celadon, glaze made of wood ash mixed with clay and 2 to 5 per cent iron is applied, then fired in a reduction low oxygen atmosphere; the potter accomplishes this by closing the kiln's intake ports at a precise internal temperature, which is determined by observing the degree of incandescence within the kiln through a peephole. If the timing is off, the glaze will maintain its original whitish color. The resulting colors range from a pale, almost white green to a bright apple green, while the glaze finish ranges from matte to a glassy, reflective surface. Large, shallow plates or chargers were particularly coveted in the islands; they reflect Southeast Asian and Islamic influence, as the large size was suited to communal eating. However, this charger probably never was exported, as it slumped in the kiln and was undoubtedly considered a kiln waster. The plate was originally devoid of decoration, with the design now on the surface having been added in recent years by an unscrupulous dealer to enhance the price of the object. Even in the photograph, you can make out how lines mimicking incisions were drawn on both the exterior and interior. The base elucidates the firing technique, as the circular mark indicates the charger was stacked in the kiln using a disc support, the typical Sawankhalok kiln support used to separate the dishes so the glaze does not adhere them together.

  • Thumbnail for Jarlet - bottom view
    Jarlet - bottom view

    From Sawankhalok. Stoneware, H: 4" x Dia. 2". Small covered boxes and jarlets were exported in huge quantities from the Thai export kilns of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries to island Southeast Asia; their uses can only be imagined possibly for spices, unguents, cosmetics, or some other precious commodity. We do know that they were used in burials, possibly taking the place of larger, more valued ceramics. Since glazed wares were not produced in island Southeast Asia, these objects formed an important part of the import market. Two lugs at the shoulders allow a cover to be tied over the top and also allow for suspension of the jarlet off the ground, away from insects and rodents. Indentations in the body of the jarlet gives it a melon shape. The base is finished and the pale celadon is slightly crackled. Jarlets of this type were also produced by the Chinese, but the Thai jarlets generally are more finely finished with a carefully carved-recessed base. Excavations of burials in the Philippines revealed a ceremonial placement of imported vessels around the body Thai jarlets were placed around the head, Chinese plates were inverted over the pubic area, saucers were placed beneath the hands, and local wares were arranged away from the body. What this arrangement meant will never be known, but it does suggest that a specific symbolic significance was assigned to the various vessels.