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  • Thumbnail for Men Talking - full view
    Men Talking - full view

    Hanging scroll; ink and color on paper. Dimensions: 31 1/4 x 21 in. Condition is excellent with rollers missing on scroll.

  • Thumbnail for Man Pointing (Kanzan) - closer view of image
    Man Pointing (Kanzan) - closer view of image

    Hanging scroll; ink and color on paper. Dimensions: 11 1/2 x 51 in. Condition is excellent. Represents the Chinese poet Han Shan (Japanese: Kanzan), and is a pair with 'Man with Broom at Feet', which represents Shide (Japanese: Jittoku).

  • Thumbnail for Bird with Willow - closer view of signature
    Bird with Willow - closer view of signature

    Hanging scroll; ink and color on paper. Dimensions: 7 x 3/4 x 49 in. Condition is excellent.

  • Thumbnail for Palm Sunday
    Palm Sunday by Sadao Watanabe (1913-1996)

    Kappazuri or katazome dyed stencil print, 4/100, 34 1/2 x 24 1/2 inches. There are 57 examples of the stencil-prints (kappazuri) of Watanabe Sadao in the Brauer Museum of Art. Watanabe is, perhaps, the most famous Christian-Japanese print master to date. Frances Blakemore states that "Watanabe's works are in collections from South Africa to Australia, from the Philippines to Europe." (Who's who in Modern Japanese Prints, p. 228). 23 institutions list examples of his work in their collections, including the Museums of Modern Art of Tokyo and New York, the Honolulu Academy of Arts, the British Museum, and the Haifa Museum. Ten of Watanabe's prints are on permanent display in the Vatican Museum of Modern Art. Watanabe also has had shows of his prints in the US, Japan, Brussels, the Netherlands, China, Germany, Denmark, and Indonesia. His work was included into the exhibition of Japanese prints at the Winter Olympics in Sapporo in 1972. Watanabe has won the prizes of the Folk Art Museum, the Japanese Print Association, and other prestigious bodies. He is holder of the coveted prize of the Kokuga sosaku kyokai, the organization that holds the Arts in Spring-Kokuten Exhibition that is such an important event in the world of modern art in Japan. The range in date, subject, and size of these prints means that the Watanabe Collection of the Brauer Museum of Art provides excellent coverage of this key Creative Print master, increasing its value for his study.

  • Thumbnail for Mt. Horai [Isle of the Immortals] - closer view of inscription
    Mt. Horai [Isle of the Immortals] - closer view of inscription by Okada Beisanjin (1744-1818)

    Hanging scroll; ink and light colors on silk. Dimensions: 34 3/4 x 19 7/8 in. Condition is good. A relatively formal work for this artist.

  • Thumbnail for Santali Ganesha
    Santali Ganesha

    Cast bronze figure, 44 inches in height. Santali refers to tribal groups; sometimes it is used to mean tribes of a certain region, but it is also used generically to reference tribals, that is, indigenous Indian peoples who were never fully assimilated into Hindu India. In this sense, images such as these are relevant to discussions of the caste or varna system of South Asia and the official government policy of reservation for Untouchables, Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes that formed a part of the Constitution of the Republic of India. This is comparable to what in the US would be called Affirmative Action, but with much more specific initiatives. The notion that there are indigenous peoples of India who are regarded as having inhabited the subcontinent prior to the appearance of the Aryan tribes who brought their Sanskritic traditions can provide provocative possibilities for discussion in a range of disciplines (Religious Studies, Anthropology, Sociology, History, Art History). These are relatively large (Ganesha is over 3 ft. in height; Siva-Kali about 2 feet) and quite handsome pieces which follow more or less standard Hindu iconographic schemes (the Hindu deities Siva, Kali, Ganesha) but in style depart from the styles of sculpture practiced in Hindu states and courts. Thus they lend themselves to discussions of standard Hindu iconography as well as to the nature of tribal traditions in South Asia; they could also generate interesting discussions of 'classical' versus 'tribal' in Asian art: what makes a work 'folk art' (that is, its origin, its makers or patrons, its formal qualities?). And how have these traditions come to intersect and interact in the last century? While these are designated as 19th century they may in fact be more recent in manufacture.

  • Thumbnail for Copy of Persian Miniature
    Copy of Persian Miniature

    8 x 14 inches; subject matter here a palace scene. These are extremely well executed copies of 15th- and 16th-century Persian miniatures (Timurid and Safavid). This image lends itself to pedagogical purposes in several ways. First, they raise the issue of copies and how we approach and consider these; certainly they will not be the only works in the project that are relevant to such questions, but they are quite fine works. Second, and perhaps far more significant, is that they represent folios from manuscripts that were created at the Muslim courts of 16th-century Persia (Tabriz and Shiraz) and thus exemplify the subjects that typify Muslim manuscripts of the era. Opportunities to engage issues relevant to the Islamic world (considering that the vast majority of the world's Muslims live in Asia, not the Middle East) will be of great value to students. For example, these paintings lend themselves to discussions of the nature of iconoclasm in Islamic art, to what kinds of subjects might and which might not be depicted in painting, as well as to the diverse attitudes within various schools of Islam regarding the acceptability of painting. They include depictions of historical themes and themes from poetry. Thus they could also generate interesting research projects for students: they lend themselves to research on the styles of Persian painting they represent; to identification of the particular themes depicted; and of course students could likely identify the particular paintings they copy. Finally, because these styles of Persian painting formed an essential element in shaping the Mughal painting school that arose in 16th-century India (the two artists that headed the emperor Akbar's painting workshop came to India from the Safavid court at Tabriz), they represent a direct link to Mughal painting in India.

  • Thumbnail for Copy of Persian Miniature
    Copy of Persian Miniature

    8 x 14 inches; subject matter a palace scene. This is one of several extremely well executed copies of 15th- and 16th-century Persian miniatures (Timurid and Safavid). They lend themselves to pedagogical purposes in several ways. First, they raise the issue of copies and how we approach and consider these; certainly they will not be the only works in the project that are relevant to such questions, but they are quite fine works. Second, and perhaps far more significant, is that they represent folios from manuscripts that were created at the Muslim courts of 16th-century Persia (Tabriz and Shiraz) and thus exemplify the subjects that typify Muslim manuscripts of the era. Opportunities to engage issues relevant to the Islamic world (considering that the vast majority of the world's Muslims live in Asia, not the Middle East) will be of great value to students. For example, these paintings lend themselves to discussions of the nature of iconoclasm in Islamic art, to what kinds of subjects might and which might not be depicted in painting, as well as to the diverse attitudes within various schools of Islam regarding the acceptability of painting. They include depictions of historical themes and themes from poetry. Thus they could also generate interesting research projects for students: they lend themselves to research on the styles of Persian painting they represent; to identification of the particular themes depicted; and of course students could likely identify the particular paintings they copy. Finally, because these styles of Persian painting formed an essential element in shaping the Mughal painting school that arose in 16th-century India (the two artists that headed the emperor Akbar's painting workshop came to India from the Safavid court at Tabriz), they represent a direct link to Mughal painting in India.

  • Thumbnail for Santali tribal figure of Kali, for Shiva base - side view
    Santali tribal figure of Kali, for Shiva base - side view

    Cast bronze with gilding, 20 x 7 inches. Santali refers to tribal groups; sometimes it is used to mean tribes of a certain region, but it is also used generically to reference tribals, that is, indigenous Indian peoples who were never fully assimilated into Hindu India. In this sense, images such as these are relevant to discussions of the caste or varna system of South Asia and the official government policy of reservation for Untouchables, Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes that formed a part of the Constitution of the Republic of India. This is comparable to what in the US would be called Affirmative Action, but with much more specific initiatives. The notion that there are indigenous peoples of India who are regarded as having inhabited the subcontinent prior to the appearance of the Aryan tribes who brought their Sanskritic traditions can provide provocative possibilities for discussion in a range of disciplines (Religious Studies, Anthropology, Sociology, History, Art History). These are relatively large (Ganesha is over 3 ft. in height; Siva-Kali about 2 feet) and quite handsome pieces which follow more or less standard Hindu iconographic schemes (the Hindu deities Siva, Kali, Ganesha) but in style depart from the styles of sculpture practiced in Hindu states and courts. Thus they lend themselves to discussions of standard Hindu iconography as well as to the nature of tribal traditions in South Asia; they could also generate interesting discussions of 'classical' versus 'tribal' in Asian art: what makes a work 'folk' art (that is, its origin, its makers or patrons, its formal qualities?). And how have these traditions come to intersect and interact in the last century? While these are designated as 19th century they may in fact be more recent in manufacture.

  • Thumbnail for Santali Ganesha - detail
    Santali Ganesha - detail

    Cast bronze figure, 44 inches in height. Santali refers to tribal groups; sometimes it is used to mean tribes of a certain region, but it is also used generically to reference tribals, that is, indigenous Indian peoples who were never fully assimilated into Hindu India. In this sense, images such as these are relevant to discussions of the caste or varna system of South Asia and the official government policy of reservation for Untouchables, Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes that formed a part of the Constitution of the Republic of India. This is comparable to what in the US would be called Affirmative Action, but with much more specific initiatives. The notion that there are indigenous peoples of India who are regarded as having inhabited the subcontinent prior to the appearance of the Aryan tribes who brought their Sanskritic traditions can provide provocative possibilities for discussion in a range of disciplines (Religious Studies, Anthropology, Sociology, History, Art History). These are relatively large (Ganesha is over 3 ft. in height; Siva-Kali about 2 feet) and quite handsome pieces which follow more or less standard Hindu iconographic schemes (the Hindu deities Siva, Kali, Ganesha) but in style depart from the styles of sculpture practiced in Hindu states and courts. Thus they lend themselves to discussions of standard Hindu iconography as well as to the nature of tribal traditions in South Asia; they could also generate interesting discussions of 'classical' versus 'tribal' in Asian art: what makes a work 'folk art' (that is, its origin, its makers or patrons, its formal qualities?). And how have these traditions come to intersect and interact in the last century? While these are designated as 19th century they may in fact be more recent

  • Thumbnail for Copy of Persian Miniature
    Copy of Persian Miniature

    8 x 14 inches; subject matter a meeting in an exterior setting. These are extremely well executed copies of 15th- and 16th-century Persian miniatures (Timurid and Safavid). This image lends itself to pedagogical purposes in several ways. First, they raise the issue of copies and how we approach and consider these; certainly they will not be the only works in the project that are relevant to such questions, but they are quite fine works. Second, and perhaps far more significant, is that they represent folios from manuscripts that were created at the Muslim courts of 16th-century Persia (Tabriz and Shiraz) and thus exemplify the subjects that typify Muslim manuscripts of the era. Opportunities to engage issues relevant to the Islamic world (considering that the vast majority of the world's Muslims live in Asia, not the Middle East) will be of great value to students. For example, these paintings lend themselves to discussions of the nature of iconoclasm in Islamic art, to what kinds of subjects might and which might not be depicted in painting, as well as to the diverse attitudes within various schools of Islam regarding the acceptability of painting. They include depictions of historical themes and themes from poetry. Thus they could also generate interesting research projects for students: they lend themselves to research on the styles of Persian painting they represent; to identification of the particular themes depicted; and of course students could likely identify the particular paintings they copy. Finally, because these styles of Persian painting formed an essential element in shaping the Mughal painting school that arose in 16th-century India (the two artists that headed the emperor Akbar's painting workshop came to India from the Safavid court at Tabriz), they represent a direct link to Mughal painting in India.

  • Thumbnail for (Untitled) from The Spirit of Harmony
    (Untitled) from The Spirit of Harmony by Wang Ming, b. 1922

    Piece from Spirit of Harmony, a twelve piece suite, acrylic on paper. Like many contemporary painters, Wang Ming works in series; the works in the Fairfield collection are all multiples: the pair of acrylic on canvas works that hang in the Canisius stairwell; the twelve-piece suite on paper on view in the library; the pair of paintings in acrylic on paper in the Quick Center; and the lengthy scrolls painted on paper and mounted on linen that hang in the lobby of the science building. These works indicate the range of style and technique that characterizes Wang Ming's painting, from monochrome brushwork-style painting that alludes to both traditional Chinese brush painting as well as to the gestural painting that was being created in the New York art world when Wang Ming first arrived in the US from China in the mid-20th century; to works of rich and subtle color, to the more bold color and brushwork of the scrolls. All are abstract, as is characteristic of the artist's work in general; his abstract styles may be understood as referencing not only the long tradition of calligraphy as an abstract art form in China and the inherently abstact nature of much traditional Chinese painting but also, again, the avante-garde art movement Abstract Expressionism, which dominated the New York art world in the mid-20th century. Wang Ming's work consciously and seamlessly bridges and unites these varied aspects of his own artistic heritage and interests.

  • Thumbnail for Santali tribal figure of Kali, for Shiva base - full view
    Santali tribal figure of Kali, for Shiva base - full view

    Cast bronze with gilding, 20 x 7 inches. Santali refers to tribal groups; sometimes it is used to mean tribes of a certain region, but it is also used generically to reference tribals, that is, indigenous Indian peoples who were never fully assimilated into Hindu India. In this sense, images such as these are relevant to discussions of the caste or varna system of South Asia and the official government policy of reservation for Untouchables, Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes that formed a part of the Constitution of the Republic of India. This is comparable to what in the US would be called Affirmative Action, but with much more specific initiatives. The notion that there are indigenous peoples of India who are regarded as having inhabited the subcontinent prior to the appearance of the Aryan tribes who brought their Sanskritic traditions can provide provocative possibilities for discussion in a range of disciplines (Religious Studies, Anthropology, Sociology, History, Art History). These are relatively large (Ganesha is over 3 ft. in height; Siva-Kali about 2 feet) and quite handsome pieces which follow more or less standard Hindu iconographic schemes (the Hindu deities Siva, Kali, Ganesha) but in style depart from the styles of sculpture practiced in Hindu states and courts. Thus they lend themselves to discussions of standard Hindu iconography as well as to the nature of tribal traditions in South Asia; they could also generate interesting discussions of 'classical' versus 'tribal' in Asian art: what makes a work 'folk' art (that is, its origin, its makers or patrons, its formal qualities?). And how have tribal and classical traditions come to intersect and interact in the last century?

  • Thumbnail for Fisherman’s Dream
    Fisherman’s Dream by Sawai, Noboru (b. 1931)

    Etching, dry point, woodblock print, 30 x 21 3/8 inches, by Noboru Sawai. Shows a large plate of fish on the table, with four small plates above on the wall. It celebrates a catch of fish caught by fishermen living on an island in the Inland Sea of Japan, where Noboru was born. The plump fish have been expertly and beautifully drawn, using a combination of printmaking techniques. The large plate has a border of naked figures echoing Picasso; the small plates have images taken from Japanese and Western sexual art. The emotional clash of Asian and Western cultures in a Japanese person is Noboru's perennial theme. Noboru studied with Toshi Yoshida and presently has a studio in Vancouver, Canada.

  • Thumbnail for Lioness B
    Lioness B by Yoshida, Toshi (1911-1995)

    Woodblock print, 14.75 x 16.75 inches. Another black and white lioness, with head down on a rock outcropping. This black and white image has been taken from the key block used for the larger, full color woodblock print, Peaceful Wild Animals, 1974, by Toshi. It shows the incredibly fine, detailed carving Toshi was able to do. The lines for the fur, for example, have been carved in the wood in a way that delineates the shape of the muscles in the body and the light reflected off of them. For a carver to do this without additional shading, shows great skill and artistry. The complete full color print shows all three animals together on a rock in the vast African savannah. This extra large print was carved from a single block of cherry wood. St.Olaf College has the entire large black and white key block impression, slightly cropped, in its collection.

  • Thumbnail for Farmhouse
    Farmhouse by Yoshida, Tsukasa (b. 1949)

    9.5 x 14.75 inches woodblock print. Study of an Asian farmhouse surrounded by trees with a forest in the background. Son of Toshi Yoshida and third generation of Yoshida family artists. It shows a typical old Japanese farmhouse, with trees and plowed field. These have been rendered simply and directly, yet with quiet respect for rural life. It is one of Tsukasa's earliest prints, one without an apparent deeper level of meaning. Tsukasa is youngest son of Toshi Yoshida and part of the fourth generation of Yoshida family artists.

  • Thumbnail for No. 8
    No. 8 by Yoshida, Toshi (1911-1995)

    15.5 x 10.5 in. Electric blue and dark blue gestural. A totally abstract image with an almost electric blue crackling across a ground of dark blue with black tracery. It belongs to a series of the earliest abstract prints that Toshi began creating in 1951-2. As Hiroshi Yoshida's eldest son,Toshi inherited the Yoshida Studio in Tokyo.

  • Thumbnail for Nihonbashi Station from series, Kyoka Tokaido
    Nihonbashi Station from series, Kyoka Tokaido by Hiroshige I

    Figures walking over a bridge with boats in the water below and rooftops and a mountain in the background.

  • Thumbnail for Okazaki
    Okazaki by Hiroshige, Ando

    8 x 10 in. A comic poem printed from block on the image. Bridge goes from left to right, castle is on bank to the right, distant mountains in center.

  • Thumbnail for Kabuki Actor
  • Thumbnail for Silver
    Silver by Yoshida, Toshi

    Abstract horizontal design in white and green on gray and red background

  • Thumbnail for Peacock and Cherry Blossoms
    Peacock and Cherry Blossoms by Shusai, (Ryusai)

    Multicolored print of landscape featuring peacocks.

  • Thumbnail for Cormorants
    Cormorants by Unknown

    Two cormorants perched over water with a basket floating below.

  • Thumbnail for Men Talking - closeup of image
    Men Talking - closeup of image

    Hanging scroll; ink and color on paper. Dimensions: 31 1/4 x 21 in. Condition is excellent with only rollers missing on scroll.

  • Thumbnail for Mountain Scene - detail of inscription
    Mountain Scene - detail of inscription

    Hanging scroll; ink on paper. Dimensions: 56 x 16 1/4 in. Condition of this work is excellent.