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  • Thumbnail for Men Talking - closeup of signature
    Men Talking - closeup of signature

    Hanging scroll; ink and color on paper. Dimensions: 31 1/4 x 21 in.Condition is excellent with rollers missing on scroll.

  • Thumbnail for Bird with Willow - closer view of image
    Bird with Willow - closer view of image

    Hanging scroll; ink and color on paper. Dimensions: 7 x 3/4 x 49 in. Condition is excellent.

  • Thumbnail for Net-fishing Boats at Wakasa from the series Famous Places in the Sixty Odd Provinces (Rokuju yoshu meisho zue)
    Net-fishing Boats at Wakasa from the series Famous Places in the Sixty Odd Provinces (Rokuju yoshu meisho zue) by Utagawa (Ando) Hiroshige (1797-1858)

    Woodcut on paper, 14 x 10 inches. This example of a traditional Japanese woodblock print or Ukiyo-e is in good condition, although there is some staining and slight damage to the paper. The print is in the oban (15 x 10") format -- paper being issued in a set size in the Tokugawa Period as the Shogunate had a monopoly on it. Net-fishing Boats at Wakasa belongs to a series of 70 prints of the Famous Places in the Sixty Odd Provinces (Rokuju yoshu meisho zue,) these works being produced between 1853-56. The publisher of this print was Koshimura-ya Heisuke, the print bearing his Koshi-hei seal.

  • Thumbnail for Mt. Horai [Isle of the Immortals] - closer view of seal to right of inscription
    Mt. Horai [Isle of the Immortals] - closer view of seal to right of inscription by Okada Beisanjin (1744-1818)

    Hanging scroll; ink and light colors on silk. Dimensions: 34 3/4 x 19 7/8 in. Condition is good. A relatively formal work for this artist.

  • Thumbnail for Mt. Horai [Isle of the Immortals]
    Mt. Horai [Isle of the Immortals] by Okada Beisanjin (1744-1818)

    Hanging scroll; ink and light colors on silk. Dimensions: 34 3/4 x 19 7/8 in. Condition is good. A relatively formal work for this artist.

  • Thumbnail for Egrets and Rushes at Night -  full view
    Egrets and Rushes at Night - full view by Shiokawa Bunrin (1808-77)

    Hanging scroll; ink and colors on silk. Dimensions: 44 3/8 x 19 3/8 in. Condition is good. A fine example of 19th century decorative naturalism.

  • Thumbnail for Autumn Landscape - closer view of inscription
    Autumn Landscape - closer view of inscription by Yamamoto Baiitsu (1783-1856)

    Hanging scroll; ink and colors on silk. Dimensions: 14 1/2 x 23 in. Condition is good. Fine example of this artist's work.

  • Thumbnail for The Last Supper
    The Last Supper by Sadao Watanabe (1913-1996)

    Kappazuri or katazome dyed stencil print, 11/80, 24 x 28 inches. There are 57 examples of the stencil-prints (kappazuri) of Watanabe Sadao in the Brauer Museum of Art. Watanabe is, perhaps, the most famous Christian-Japanese print master to date. Frances Blakemore states that "Watanabe's works are in collections from South Africa to Australia, from the Philippines to Europe." (Who's who in Modern Japanese Prints, p. 228). 23 institutions list examples of his work in their collections, including the Museums of Modern Art of Tokyo and New York, the Honolulu Academy of Arts, the British Museum, and the Haifa Museum. Ten of Watanabe's prints are on permanent display in the Vatican Museum of Modern Art. Watanabe also has had shows of his prints in the US, Japan, Brussels, the Netherlands, China, Germany, Denmark, and Indonesia. His work was included into the exhibition of Japanese prints at the Winter Olympics in Sapporo in 1972. Watanabe has won the prizes of the Folk Art Museum, the Japanese Print Association, and other prestigious bodies. He is holder of the coveted prize of the Kokuga sosaku kyokai, the organization that holds the Arts in Spring-Kokuten Exhibition that is such an important event in the world of modern art in Japan. The range in date, subject, and size of these prints means that the Watanabe Collection of the Brauer Museum of Art provides excellent coverage of this key Creative Print master, increasing its value for his study.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese garden - view two
    Japanese garden - view two

    Garden designed by Arthur Shurtleff; originally included a pagoda, bridge, pond and working replica of Mount Fujiyama, of which remnants are preserved. Part of the Lasher estate which formed the southern half of the Fairfield campus in 1942. The Lasher garden is likely a unique element within the Asian Art in the Undergraduate Curriculum project; it lends itself to inclusion in the project not only for this singularity but because it exemplifies fascinating questions and issues. This is a 'Japanese garden' designed by an American landscape architect for an American client in the late 1920s; it is situated adjacent to what was the Lasher house and is now Bellarmine Hall, the location of the President's Office and the Office of Admissions. It included, as the information provided indicates, a 'working' replica of Mt. Fuji--that is, Mr. Lasher could entertain guests by an 'eruption' of the volcano. In the years since the Lashers' residence there and the recent present the garden was neglected to the extent that it is difficult to make out some of its original features. Other elements of the original garden are also lost, decayed, or neglected, but many of its features remain, including footpaths, bridges, lanterns, and of course plantings, and in the last few years plans have been undertaken to restore the garden. The existence of old lantern slides of the garden--which should be considered an important part of the Asian collection, as such objects are artifacts in their own right--permits at least a partial understanding of the original appearance; drawings by the architect (again, this could be considered part of the Asian collection) are also important in this respect. Among those involved in the restoration is a Fairfield resident who is currently a student of architecture at Syracuse. The desire to implement a plan seems to be shared by various constituents around the campus, and while funds are central to how, when and if this will occur, enthusiasm for the project indicates it is likely to be completed. The restored garden could serve faculty, students, administrators, and visitors not only as a pleasant refuge but also as a resource for teaching and learning. As the entrance to Bellarmine is gradually restored and its sense as a grand entrance enhanced, the role of the garden--situated just adjacent to the entrance--can also grow. Furthermore, as the Museum planned for Bellarmine is put in place, the garden will become more prominent, as one will walk along it in order to reach the museum entrance.

  • Thumbnail for Standing female figure wearing skirt and headdress - back view
    Standing female figure wearing skirt and headdress - back view

    Wood-carved with added white paint. This handsome figure is another Manderman folk piece. She seems to most closely resemble what are often called bhuta figures from 19th-20th-century Karnataka. Bhuta is another term that is used in various ways; in the orthodox tradition it has meaning associated with ghosts, with evil forces, with potentially malevolent spirits. Bhuta has been used as a term to signify those malevolent spritis outside the orthodox traditions of Hinduism and thus has also come to signifiy, more generically, folk deities, powerful forces outside the pantheon of the Hindu tradition; but in this sense these are not necessarily malevolent or destructive; rather they are beings/ forces/ spirits of limited and often highly localized powers. What this figure shares with other Karnataka figures that have been termed bhutas are the material and general form: she is made of wood, rather simply carved, with a strongly stylized, geometric body. Her body is contructed of a series of geometric shapes, with tubular arms, a cylindrical trunk pinched at the waist, her face strongly circular with large ears that project at a direct perpendicular from the cheeks. The details of the face are simplified in a manner that is shared with the marble Jina. There are several details that set this figure apart from better-known so-called bhutas from Karnataka: she seems to wear a garment that covers her upper body, a feature quite unusual in the depiction of females in Indian art in general and in typical bhutas from Karnataka, in which the upper body is also usually nude except for jewelry; her skirt falls in wide gores with only a few folds, while in most bhuta figures from Karnataka the skirt is rendered in a continuous series of thin folds that create a more detailed pattern of vertical forms along the lower body; and rarely are typical Karnataka bhutas painted, as this figure is. Further research may suggest a different provenance, as wooden 'folk' figures hail from many regions.

  • Thumbnail for Standing female figure wearing skirt and headdress
    Standing female figure wearing skirt and headdress

    Wood-carved with added white paint. This handsome figure is another Manderman folk piece. She seems to most closely resemble what are often called bhuta figures from 19th-20th-century Karnataka. Bhuta is another term that is used in various ways; in the orthodox tradition it has meaning associated with ghosts, with evil forces, with potentially malevolent spirits. Bhuta has been used as a term to signify those malevolent spritis outside the orthodox traditions of Hinduism and thus has also come to signifiy, more generically, folk deities, powerful forces outside the pantheon of the Hindu tradition; but in this sense these are not necessarily malevolent or destructive; rather they are beings/ forces/ spirits of limited and often highly localized powers. What this figure shares with other Karnataka figures that have been termed bhutas are the material and general form: she is made of wood, rather simply carved, with a strongly stylized, geometric body. Her body is contructed of a series of geometric shapes, with tubular arms, a cylindrical trunk pinched at the waist, her face strongly circular with large ears that project at a direct perpendicular from the cheeks. The details of the face are simplified in a manner that is shared with the marble Jina. There are several details that set this figure apart from better-known so-called bhutas from Karnataka: she seems to wear a garment that covers her upper body, a feature quite unusual in the depiction of females in Indian art in general and in typical bhutas from Karnataka, in which the upper body is also usually nude except for jewelry; her skirt falls in wide gores with only a few folds, while in most bhuta figures from Karnataka the skirt is rendered in a continuous series of thin folds that create a more detailed pattern of vertical forms along the lower body; and rarely are typical Karnataka bhutas painted, as this figure is. Further research may suggest a different provenance, as wooden 'folk' figures hail from many regions.

  • Thumbnail for Santali tribal figure of Kali, for Shiva base - side view
    Santali tribal figure of Kali, for Shiva base - side view

    Cast bronze with gilding, 20 x 7 inches. Santali refers to tribal groups; sometimes it is used to mean tribes of a certain region, but it is also used generically to reference tribals, that is, indigenous Indian peoples who were never fully assimilated into Hindu India. In this sense, images such as these are relevant to discussions of the caste or varna system of South Asia and the official government policy of reservation for Untouchables, Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes that formed a part of the Constitution of the Republic of India. This is comparable to what in the US would be called Affirmative Action, but with much more specific initiatives. The notion that there are indigenous peoples of India who are regarded as having inhabited the subcontinent prior to the appearance of the Aryan tribes who brought their Sanskritic traditions can provide provocative possibilities for discussion in a range of disciplines (Religious Studies, Anthropology, Sociology, History, Art History). These are relatively large (Ganesha is over 3 ft. in height; Siva-Kali about 2 feet) and quite handsome pieces which follow more or less standard Hindu iconographic schemes (the Hindu deities Siva, Kali, Ganesha) but in style depart from the styles of sculpture practiced in Hindu states and courts. Thus they lend themselves to discussions of standard Hindu iconography as well as to the nature of tribal traditions in South Asia; they could also generate interesting discussions of 'classical' versus 'tribal' in Asian art: what makes a work 'folk' art (that is, its origin, its makers or patrons, its formal qualities?). And how have these traditions come to intersect and interact in the last century? While these are designated as 19th century they may in fact be more recent in manufacture.

  • Thumbnail for Fisherman’s Dream
    Fisherman’s Dream by Sawai, Noboru (b. 1931)

    Etching, dry point, woodblock print, 30 x 21 3/8 inches, by Noboru Sawai. Shows a large plate of fish on the table, with four small plates above on the wall. It celebrates a catch of fish caught by fishermen living on an island in the Inland Sea of Japan, where Noboru was born. The plump fish have been expertly and beautifully drawn, using a combination of printmaking techniques. The large plate has a border of naked figures echoing Picasso; the small plates have images taken from Japanese and Western sexual art. The emotional clash of Asian and Western cultures in a Japanese person is Noboru's perennial theme. Noboru studied with Toshi Yoshida and presently has a studio in Vancouver, Canada.

  • Thumbnail for A Group of Quails
    A Group of Quails by Chikudo, Kish

    13 x 8.75 in. Print of several birds with a multiicolored background. From a series Niphon Gwafu (A Collection of Sketches of Japan ) published by Kinkodo in 1891.

  • Thumbnail for Spring in a Hot Spring
    Spring in a Hot Spring by Yoshida, Hiroshi (1876-1950)

    Woodblock print, 9.75 x 14.5 inches. Cherry blossoms in early spring in the foreground, a bridge over a stream with figures and buildings, and in the background a spa,trees, and mountains - all in delicate muted green, pink and brown. The artist captures what, for any Japanese person, is a nostalgic moment in an ideal setting. Unseen here are clouds of war gathering. Hiroshi was historically the most important artist in the Yoshida family. About 1900 and following, Americans bought many of his watercolors and, after the war, many of his prints. Yoshida Hiroshi is a second generation Yoshida family artist, who established the Yoshida Studio in Tokyo. The Yoshida family of artists began with Yoshida Kasaburô (1861-1894), then next Yoshida Hiroshi (1876-1950) and his wife Fujio (1887-1987), then their sons Toshi (1911-1995) with his wife Kiso (1919-2005) and Hodaka (1926-1995) with his wife Chizuko (1924- ) and daughter Ayomi (1958- ).

  • Thumbnail for Morning of New Year’s in Ginza
    Morning of New Year’s in Ginza by Yoshida, Toshi (1911-1995)

    Woodblock Print, 10.25 x 7.5 inches. A 1958 cityscape of the well-known Ginza shopping area in Tokyo, with cars and a streetcar in the dark gray foreground and with a horizon of skyscrapers against a pink sky. Dawn might also suggest Tokyo's amazing recovery 13 years after the end of the Second World War. The style Toshi used - straight horizontal, vertical and wavy lines - is unique to this print. It would have made an attractive New Year's gift for American buyers of Yoshida family prints. Many American soldiers were still stationed in Japan at that time, and many of them visited the Yoshida Studio, bought prints, and began collections that still remain intact at the present time.

  • Thumbnail for Profile of an Ancient Warrior
    Profile of an Ancient Warrior by Yoshida, Hodaka (1926-1995)

    18.5 x 17.5 in. Abstract: black background, black, natural, red, with yellow, gold and orange lines. An fascinating abstract print, showing an image of a Japanese warrior, energetically charging toward an unseen foe. Black background, figure as open space, black line, red, with yellow, gold and orange lines. This is a profile of fierce energy. The lines within the figure seem to spin around and collide. The dripped yellow and black lines echo Japanese pottery or Jackson Pollock. Yoshida Hodaka is a third generation Yoshida family artist, brother of Toshi.

  • Thumbnail for Movement
    Movement by Yoshida, Toshi (1911-1995)

    Woodblock print, 21.5 X 27.75 inches. A beautiful blue and green abstract wave seems to loom up and forward, its open spaces forming a face with small drops as eyes. The artist is being playful, his image a gesture. His print stands in sharp contrast to the greatest wave in Japanese art history, Hokusai's "Under the Great Wave at Kanagawa."

  • Thumbnail for Watanabe Studio
    Watanabe Studio by Watanabe, Shozobaro

    Studio in foreground with mountain and trees in background.

  • Thumbnail for Kabuki Actor
  • Thumbnail for Silver
    Silver by Yoshida, Toshi

    Abstract horizontal design in white and green on gray and red background

  • Thumbnail for Iris Gardens at Horikiri
    Iris Gardens at Horikiri by Ogata, Gekko

    Woman carrying a parasol in a garden of iris.

  • Thumbnail for The Birthday of Buddha
    The Birthday of Buddha by Shoso, Mishima

    Multicolored print of children showering water of an image of Buddha.

  • Thumbnail for Fukeroi
    Fukeroi by Hiroshige I

    Three trees against spring sky, figures working in rice paddies, two kites flying and calligraphy.

  • Thumbnail for Cormorants
    Cormorants by Unknown

    Two cormorants perched over water with a basket floating below.