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  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2013-02-04]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2013-02-04] by Walden, Jacob , Mia, Mohammad

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Executive Council meeting held on February 4, 2013. Members present include: Student Concerns Vice President Charis Whitnah, Outreach Vice President Pat Knecht, Finance Vice President Stanley Sigalov, and Constitutional Vice President Elliott Mamet.

  • Thumbnail for Do you love orgasms
    Do you love orgasms by Johnson, Savannah A.

    This poster was created for the event "I <3 (Female) Orgasm", held on April 24, 2013 at 7:00 p.m., in the Cornerstone Theater on the Colorado College Campus. The event included a presentation by guest speakers Marshall Miller and Kate Weinberg.

  • Thumbnail for The purple paper : politics monthly [2012-2013 Block 6]
    The purple paper : politics monthly [2012-2013 Block 6]

    The Purple Paper : Politics Monthly is the newsletter of the CC Dems, CC Repubs and the Collaborative for Community Engagement.

  • Thumbnail for The purple paper : politics monthly [2012-2013 Block 7]
    The purple paper : politics monthly [2012-2013 Block 7]

    The Purple Paper : Politics Monthly is the newsletter of the CC Dems, CC Repubs and the Collaborative for Community Engagement.

  • Thumbnail for The purple paper : politics monthly [2012-2013 Block 8]
    The purple paper : politics monthly [2012-2013 Block 8]

    The Purple Paper : Politics Monthly is the newsletter of the CC Dems, CC Repubs and the Collaborative for Community Engagement.

  • Thumbnail for The purple paper : politics monthly [2013-2014 Block 2]
    The purple paper : politics monthly [2013-2014 Block 2]

    The Purple Paper : Politics Monthly is the newsletter of the CC Dems, CC Repubs and the Collaborative for Community Engagement.

  • Thumbnail for FLASH 2013
    FLASH 2013

    Colorado College's photography journal produced by the Flash Photography Club. The club offers an outlet for Colorado College photographers to collaborate and learn from each other, and display their photos throughout campus.

  • Thumbnail for Harlem Shake at Tutt Library
    Harlem Shake at Tutt Library by Sigalov, Stanley

    There are many ways to beat the fourth week blues at Colorado College. This block we chose the Harlem Shake. Stanley Sigalov '13 took it upon himself to bring some joy to the Tutt Library and spread cheer. -- Catalyst Newspaper.

  • Thumbnail for Microclimatological feedbacks at treeline: Is treeline structure modifying the local microclimate?
    Microclimatological feedbacks at treeline: Is treeline structure modifying the local microclimate? by Dickson, Chris C.

    Recent study of altitudinal treeline advance has revealed that increasing seasonal temperatures only partly explain the processes that influence treeline structure and elevation. Microsite modifications, induced by the structure of the treeline, may in fact play a large role in regulating the microclimate, creating more favorable conditions for further seedling establishment and recruitment near the treeline. To explore these modifications, previous research on Pikes Peak has compared heating dynamics within a treeline microclimate to the microclimate of an adjacent rockslide at an identical elevation. Observations indicated that the treeline heats up faster and to a higher maximum temperature than the rockslide nearly every day of the study period (Johnson, 2011). Potential mechanisms for this differential heating were explored, however only the sheltering potential of the trees to reduce winds proved worthy of further investigation (Anderson, 2012). To expand upon these findings, this study aims to verify the presence of differential heating between treeline and rockslide, investigate the role of sheltering to reduce heat loss within treeline, and explore to what extent this sheltering could extend beyond the treeline’s leading edge. First, this study found that temperatures within the treeline were on average ~7C warmer than the rockslide from 15cm above the ground to 10cm deep within the soil, a critical habitat for seedling establishment (Körner, 1998). Furthermore, this study reveals that the magnitude of differential heating increases throughout the growing season, exhibiting larger differences later in the season. These findings indicate that, despite decreasing solar input late in the season, the treeline has a higher capacity to retain heat than the rockslide and prolongs favorable growing conditions later into the summer months. To investigate how sheltering may play a role in holding heat within the treeline, the zero-plane displacement was calculated for the treeline, rockslide, and upper tundra. Results indicate that treeline form shelters a boundary layer of warm air close to the ground that could enable increased heat storage within the treeline’s soil. Furthermore, this sheltering effect extends beyond the treeline’s leading edge and modifies the tundra microclimate by reducing wind effects in lee of the treeline. This mechanism of sheltering could create a positive feedback loop in which microclimatological modifications, induced by the trees presence, allow for continual growth beyond the forest boundary.

  • Thumbnail for The monthly rag [2012-2013 Block 5]
    The monthly rag [2012-2013 Block 5] by Colorado College. Dept. of Feminist and Gender Studies

    The Monthly Rag, a publication of the Feminist and Gender Studies interns, is found affixed to toilet stall walls around the Colorado College campus.

  • Thumbnail for Place as process : a comparative analysis of James Joyce’s “Eveline," Franz Kafka’s "The castle," and Jorge Luis Borges’ “Las ruinas circulares,” and an exploration into Aristotle and Heidegger on art, being, and place
    Place as process : a comparative analysis of James Joyce’s “Eveline," Franz Kafka’s "The castle," and Jorge Luis Borges’ “Las ruinas circulares,” and an exploration into Aristotle and Heidegger on art, being, and place by Tudhope, Andrea

    In modern literary theory and philosophy, the concept of place, despite its permeating influence in many if not all aspects of existence, has been far too overlooked. In my thesis, I set out to redefine place in a way that encompasses this importance. I chose to ground my exploration in literature—specifically “Eveline” in James Joyce’s Dubliners, The Castle by Franz Kafka, and “Las ruinas circulares” in Jorge Luis Borges’ Ficciones—in order to then move outside of the texts to situate these works in their respective authorial realities and consider the influence of external, real place on intratextual place. To examine the extent of the relevance of each author’s own presence of place, I consider theories regarding the origin of art with the help of Aristotle’s Poetics, literary scholars who have focused on these authors, and theorists who have focused on the role of reality in fiction. Finally, with the help of Martin Heidegger’s Poetry, Language, Thought and my own analysis, I argue that there is not such a stark distinction between literature and reality, that art is neither merely imitation nor creation, author neither imitator nor creator, and in the end, I expand upon the important relationship between place, art, and being in order to formulate a new definition of place in a literary and aesthetic context.

  • Thumbnail for Martha Gellhorn and Maria Teresa Leon : exilic intellectuals with different political messages because of what they leave behind
    Martha Gellhorn and Maria Teresa Leon : exilic intellectuals with different political messages because of what they leave behind by Hutcherson, Sarah

    Martha Gellhorn (1908-1998), an American writer and journalist, and María Teresa León (1903-1988), a Spanish writer and activist, happen to be two women writing during the Spanish Civil War. They also happen to be in relationships with the renowned authors: Ernest Hemingway and Rafael Alberti. However, the reason for comparison is not founded in their gender nor their relationships with their famous literary husbands. The point of comparison that is intriguing lies in the fact that they are both intellectuals in metaphorical exile who bring double perspective to their writing, according to the theories of Edward Said, a Palestinian-American theorist. Through analyzing how León and Gellhorn bring their double perspectives to their writings, the paper will show how because their metaphorical exiles are different, the way in which they deliver their political messages in their writings varies.

  • Thumbnail for The slave and the courtesan : sorcery and cultural encounters in early modern Malta
    The slave and the courtesan : sorcery and cultural encounters in early modern Malta by Bean, Owen Randall

    The present essay examines the traffic in magical goods and services between Maltese prostitutes and Muslim slaves in seventeenth-century Malta, as it is represented in the Archives of the Inquisition in Malta. Past analyses of these archives have focused on these interactions as elements of superstition and folk religion in early modern Malta. This essay asserts that the magical trade provided a form of common engagement between slaves and prostitutes as subaltern groups. In my analysis, I use close readings of denunciations before the Maltese Inquisition and historical examples from other scholarship. This essay will be useful to those interested in Maltese history, Christian and Muslim encounters, and the problems of universalism in post-colonial discourse.

  • Thumbnail for Freedom summer : the successes and failures of the civil rights movement
    Freedom summer : the successes and failures of the civil rights movement by Turano, Kimberly

    A history senior essay looking at Mississippi in the summer of 1964, also known as Freedom Summer, and the projects that took place during the season. The successes and failures of the summer are discussed, as well as key people within the movement.

  • Thumbnail for Interpreting the Pikes Peak landscape : toward sense of place and enhanced stewardship
    Interpreting the Pikes Peak landscape : toward sense of place and enhanced stewardship by Taylor, Teresa Ann

    Can environmental education and environmental interpretation inspire a sense of place through education and interpretation specifically designed to help one understand the Pikes Peak landscape? Can the concept of sense of provide a pathway to stewardship? I believe that the answer to both of these questions is yes. My project focuses on Barr Trail (BT), the most common route to the summit of Pikes Peak. I have produced an interpretive guide to BT that incorporates theories from sense of place studies, environmental education, and environmental interpretation as a means to create connection and enhance stewardship. Personal experience with trail users over an eight year period has lead me to theorize that stewardship arises from connection to place; that connection is built on understanding within one’s own framework of experience and mindset; and that understanding requires awareness. Engaging trail users in the landscape of Pikes Peak can help create awareness of the landscape and the interconnected systems of human and non-human nature that make it a specific place. Combining the concept of experiential learning from environmental education with interpretation of the landscape can help inspire a sense of place. Gaining a sense of place in the Pikes Peak landscape can lead to better stewardship of BT.

  • Thumbnail for Sustainable development : finding a paradigm shift in Northern Thailand
    Sustainable development : finding a paradigm shift in Northern Thailand by Leichliter, Sydney Marie

    This paper seeks to explore the complex interactions of stakeholders in Northern Thailand’s rural development and examines the local, village-level impacts of different development discourses in an attempt to find what within these agendas has proven successful to local communities. Most important in this analysis is the role of local knowledge, villager agendas, and cultural durability in light of these projects. Looking at a variety of case studies from a number of different stakeholders in the conversation I analyze the impacts, both positive and negative, of the current rural development paradigms. Primarily, this paper examines the impacts of agricultural and forest development in ethnic hill tribe villages throughout Thailand. Rural villages in Southeast Asia’s Golden Triangle, the area where Laos, Thailand and China converge, still heavily rely on agriculture for their own self-sufficiency and incomes (Bello et al. 1998), although, land transformation and ecological degradation has created land insecurity in many of these Northern regions (UHDP, personal communication, January 26, 2013). [Keywords: sustainable development, indigenous knowledge, Northern Thailand]

  • Thumbnail for Religion and the death penalty
    Religion and the death penalty by Scully, Ellen S.

    Americans have questioned the morality of the death penalty for centuries. Recently, racial bias and a surge of death row exonerations have brought the death penalty back to media headlines. Although geographic, socio-economic, and racial disparities relating to the death penalty have been studied extensively, religious factors have not. This study seeks to understand why religion is consistently excluded from the death penalty debate, despite its proven importance in shaping Americans’ political attitudes, including those on the death penalty. Despite both belonging to the Christian Right, evangelical Protestants and American Catholics have opposing views regarding the death penalty; the former officially supports it, while the latter officially opposes it. Using data from the 2010 Census and the Pew Research Center, I create a probit model to discern whether large evangelical and Catholic populations help explain whether states use the death penalty. I find that large evangelical populations are not statistically significant in explaining states’ use of the death penalty, but large Catholic populations are statistically significant in reducing states’ probabilities of using the death penalty. Furthermore, I corroborate existing literature in finding that states that use the death penalty have lower incomes, more inequality, more Blacks, and more violence than states that do not use the death penalty.

  • Thumbnail for La Virgen de la Candelaria como un vehículo para la construcción de la identidad
    La Virgen de la Candelaria como un vehículo para la construcción de la identidad by Brockland, Margaret

    Este trabajo propone dilucidar el papel de un artefacto en la narración construida de la identidad, dada la natura adaptable de una figura religiosa, la Virgen de Copacabana. En la lucha por control de la narrativa social, me refiero a dos momentos históricos, la colonización y la globalización. Ambas establecen la necesidad de construir una identidad, y aluden a la complejidad de su construcción. Trabajo con la suposición que la identidad es una construcción narrada. Mi argumento central consiste en dos puntos importantes: Primero, que la Virgen es un vehículo que legitima la expresión de la identidad; y segundo, que la Virgen nos ayuda a entender que dicha identidad narrada está en un proceso dinámico y continuo de construcción.

  • Thumbnail for A quantitative study of wealthy youth subcultures : relationships and identity
    A quantitative study of wealthy youth subcultures : relationships and identity by Suzukamo, Alison

    Using the subcultural framework from the Center for Contemporary Cultural Studies (CCCS) and Marxist definitions of class this study seeks to better understand upper class youth subcultures. It argues that through identity tied to the parent culture upper class youth form subcultures of symbolic resistance around relationships both romantic and familial. This study uses quantitative analysis of a survey taken at Colorado College. Gender was statistically significant when determining respondents feelings and actions around relationships. Young women were attempting to resist the dominant discourse while young men were complicit, proving gender as a currently relevant subculture. Overall, class was not statistically significant. The analysis draws on Muggleton’s (2000) theory of neo-tribalism and hypothesis that class is no longer relevant to post modern youth. In the end, participating in youth subcultures gives the youth a sense of resistance, however, is a futile effort as subcultures are re-commodified by their dominant culture and rendered harmless without any real change to the structures of power.

  • Thumbnail for An examination of the American corrections system : analyzing the impact of programs and privatization on corrections spending and inmate rehabilitation
    An examination of the American corrections system : analyzing the impact of programs and privatization on corrections spending and inmate rehabilitation by Tams, Zachary Borden

    For decades the American corrections system has failed to provide adequate, much less successful rehabilitation to prison inmates. Paired with other factors contributing to crime, America has the unfortunate distinction of owning the world’s highest incarceration rate. Some prisons offer rehabilitation programs, many of which are very successful, but in an environment of fiscal austerity, they are often the first to be eliminated. Correctional industries are becoming more common in prisons due to their unique ability to be completely self-sufficient in requiring no government funding, as well as to provide meaningful rehabilitation that has a proven record of success. Private prisons have arisen as an alternative to relieve overcrowded public prisons. Some facilities are well managed and provide useful programs. Many private facilities, however, are purely profit-driven, and unless these facilities are held accountable to standards of financial transparency as well as meaningful rehabilitation, their numbers could grow malignantly and become nothing more than warehouses of captive labor for unscrupulous business ventures.

  • Thumbnail for "I looked around and everything was white ; the people, the dresses" : a sociological study of debutante balls
    "I looked around and everything was white ; the people, the dresses" : a sociological study of debutante balls by Starratt, Annabel Atkins

    The tradition of the debutante ball is a coming of age ritual for upper-class women that works to confirm or elevate a women, and her family’s social status. Reflecting on my own debutante ball, I was curious to know what other debutantes’ reasons for participating were, to what extent they were aware of the social implications of debutante balls, and how they made meaning of the ritual. A coming of age ritual presents implies that ones identity is changing. The majority of the women I interviewed said that their debutante ball didn’t have a large effect on their identity. The identities of elite women are influenced more by their class than their gender. The women whose identities were not effected by their ball all had family members who were also debutantes, so the ritual was confirming their status and not changing it. The two women who placed more significance on the ritual were both the first in their families to be debutantes. It seems that they find their ball more significant because it represented a changed and elevated social status for them and their families. Debutante balls are primarily ceremonies that reinforce identities, not change them. Because these women distance their role as a debutante from their identity, they also distance themselves from the negative social implications of the debutante ball. All of the women I interviewed were able to think critically about their balls, but were able to justify their participation either because of family tradition or because it was a fun experience. These women viewed debutante balls as positive from individual standpoints, however debutante balls need to be considered from a larger social perspective.

  • Thumbnail for The hidden challenges of "class" : social class and race at Colorado College
    The hidden challenges of "class" : social class and race at Colorado College by Callahan, Kathleen

    This study examines the effects of social class, race, and cultural capital on academic experience and social belonging at Colorado College. Survey data from a sample of Colorado College students about academic and social engagement at CC is analyzed in an attempt to explore how students are impacted by their social class, race, and cultural capital. Specifically, this study analyzes classroom engagement, intellectual confidence, and social belonging at Colorado College, focusing primarily on how social class and race/ethnicity intersect in ways to affect educational and social outcomes. Particular attention is paid to the ways in which “doubly disadvantaged” students, those who are first generation college students and students of color experience unique challenges at a predominantly white institution. The analysis suggests that first generation students of color face more challenges in the classroom and feel less connected to the student body than their peers. The study’s findings suggest that more attention and support need to be given to the “doubly disadvantaged” to help increase their academic and social engagement at CC. Additionally, this study advocates more research be done on the inequalities that working class minority students face within the education system.

  • Thumbnail for Maximum weight capacity of leaves used by tent-roosting bats : implications for social structure and plant species usage
    Maximum weight capacity of leaves used by tent-roosting bats : implications for social structure and plant species usage by Parker-Shames, Phoebe Amelia

    Fewer than 2% of bats have the capacity to modify their environment to construct roosts. Tent-roosting bats cut and fold leaves to form roosts called “tents” and often use specific plant species for this purpose. Unlike the caves or hollow trees used by some bats, leaves possess an upper limit on their capacity to support weight. I tested the hypothesis that the maximum weight capacity that leaves can support limits the maximum social group size of bats that roost in them. I tested a secondary hypothesis that the bat Dermanura watsoni would preferentially use the plant species that can support more weight. I conducted research in the Tirimbina Biological Reserve (TBR), Sarapiquí, Costa Rica, between March and April 2012. To test the first hypothesis, I added weight incrementally to new leaves of three plant species until the angle of the leaves fell below that which bats naturally use. Philodendron fragrantissimum and Heliconia imbricata support one-third more weight than Asterogyne martiana. To address the second hypothesis, I determined plant abundance by systematic-random plot sampling along main paths in the reserve and systematically surveyed tents along the same paths. Patterns of leaf use by D. watsoni suggest a preference for A. martiana and complete avoidance of H. imbricata. Dermanura watsoni did not show a preference for plant species that support a greater maximum weight capacity. This study demonstrates that the maximum weight that the leaves can support is similar to the mean social group weight of D. watsoni and Ectophylla alba reported in the literature for these plant species and lower than the maximum reported social group weights. Therefore, it is possible that the maximum weight capacity of the leaves used to construct roosts limits the maximum social group size but may not be an important factor used for plant selection.

  • Thumbnail for The unknown and empathy : remaining in an empathic stance
    The unknown and empathy : remaining in an empathic stance by Whitnah, Charis Joy

    Two strangers come together to facilitate the therapeutic process. In stepping into a mysterious arena, the analysand and analyst meet in the psychoanalytic treatment room. What expectations does the analysand have of the analyst? What does the analyst hope will happen through treatment? How does the analyst create an emerging psychoanalytic treatment that facilitates healing for the analysand? Through the connection between analysand and analyst, the anaylsand hopefully forms a healthier, vital, and more coherent self. One must ask how the analysand comes to feel more coherent? What are the essential ingredients of a “cure?” In seeking to answer these questions, I have focused this paper on the discussion of empathy. The paper provides a self psychological historical analysis of the concept of empathy. Through turning to the work of Sigmund Freud, Heinz Kohut, Ernest Wolf, Howard Bacal, and Richard Geist, I strive to describe the concept of empathy and discuss how empathy plays a vital role in the psychoanalytic process. I argue that the self psychological psychoanalytic value of empathy has profound and altering effects for the analysand and analyst.

  • Thumbnail for Child and play : is decreased playtime affecting the classroom? A study of the importance of recess and playtime for children