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Browsing 346 results for facet Publication Year with value of 2013.
  • Thumbnail for Whether you want to please your partner or please yourself, know the O!
    Whether you want to please your partner or please yourself, know the O! by Johnson, Savannah A.

    This poster was created for the event "I <3 (Female) Orgasm", held on April 24, 2013 at 7:00 p.m., in the Cornerstone Theater on the Colorado College Campus. The event included a presentation by guest speakers Marshall Miller and Kate Weinberg.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College bulletin [2013 November]
    Colorado College bulletin [2013 November] by Colorado College

    A publication for alumni, parents, and friends of Colorado College. Published quarterly per calendar year.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2013-03-05]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2013-03-05] by Walden, Jacob , Mia, Mohammad

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Executive Council meeting held on March 5, 2013. Members present include: President Nathan Lee, Student Concerns Vice President Charis Whitnah, Outreach Vice President Pat Knecht, Finance Vice President Stanley Sigalov, Constitutional Vice President Elliott Mamet, Associate Dean of Students Rochelle Mason, and Faculty Advisor Professor Peter Blasenheim.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2013-02-04]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2013-02-04] by Walden, Jacob , Mia, Mohammad

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Executive Council meeting held on February 4, 2013. Members present include: Student Concerns Vice President Charis Whitnah, Outreach Vice President Pat Knecht, Finance Vice President Stanley Sigalov, and Constitutional Vice President Elliott Mamet.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2013-01-22]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2013-01-22] by Walden, Jacob , Mia, Mohammad

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Executive Council meeting held on Janurary 22, 2013. Members present include: President Nathan Lee, Student Concerns Vice President Charis Whitnah, Outreach Vice President Pat Knecht, and Constitutional Vice President Elliott Mamet.

  • Thumbnail for You want 8th block to be sexellent?
    You want 8th block to be sexellent? by Johnson, Savannah A.

    This poster was created for the event "I <3 (Female) Orgasm", held on April 24, 2013 at 7:00 p.m., in the Cornerstone Theater on the Colorado College Campus. The event included a presentation by guest speakers Marshall Miller and Kate Weinberg.

  • Thumbnail for The purple paper : politics monthly [2013-2014 Block 3]
    The purple paper : politics monthly [2013-2014 Block 3]

    The Purple Paper : Politics Monthly is the newsletter of the CC Dems, CC Repubs and the Collaborative for Community Engagement.

  • Thumbnail for The climatic effects of tree growth in Colorado : the influences of climate change on the Colorado Rockies’ treeline
    The climatic effects of tree growth in Colorado : the influences of climate change on the Colorado Rockies’ treeline by Naylor, Jacqueline Nicole

    Throughout the past century, there has been a global shift in climate. Temperatures have been rising, and while precipitation has been fluctuating, it has exhibited not obvious trends. This change in climate has led to global treeline advancement, and has presented ecological, economic, and social implications. Two of the most relevant implications, especially within the context of the western United States, are changing ecosystem dynamics and water yields. Therefore this study aims to explore the effects of climate change at treeline throughout the Colorado Rockies, with the objective to use simple meteorological data to explain and predict radial tree growth. Data was collected at ten individual mountains in five mountain ranges throughout the state. The subsequent dendrochronologies for each mountain were correlated with time, local and regional meteorology, and the other nine sites. The correlation between sites was compared to the distance between sites. Chronologies were also compared to regional wind and storm patterns. Ultimately, no significant climatic trends appeared to influence individual tree growth on a regional scale throughout the Colorado Rockies. In some sites, such as those bordering the western Colorado deserts, increasing precipitation led to increased radial growth. At a small number of sites in the Front Range and the Sawatch Range, increased summer and annual temperatures led to increased radial growth as well. The remaining sites showed no connection between radial tree growth and simple local and regional meteorological data. The dendrochronologies between most mountains were significantly correlated; the correlations ranged from 0.93 to 0.25, with most of the sites correlated at 0.6 and above. Surprisingly, the correlation coefficients between sites did not respond to the distance between mountains in a statistically significant way. Based on an analysis between site correlations, three groups emerged with inter-site correlation at 0.7 and above: west of the Continental Divide, Front Range and Central Rockies, and along the Continental Divide. In general, these groups showed a southwest to northeast orientation. Storm patterns that flow from the southwest to the northeast throughout the state act as the central variable in correlating chronologies between sites. Conclusively this study does not support the hypotheses that claim climate significantly affects radial growth, but instead provides important information that can be used to further understand the implications of climate on treeline dynamics in the Colorado Rockies.

  • Thumbnail for The monthly rag [2012-2013 Block 5]
    The monthly rag [2012-2013 Block 5] by Colorado College. Dept. of Feminist and Gender Studies

    The Monthly Rag, a publication of the Feminist and Gender Studies interns, is found affixed to toilet stall walls around the Colorado College campus.

  • Thumbnail for Check yourself [2012-2013 Block 7]
    Check yourself [2012-2013 Block 7] by Hampson, Tucker , Naden, Anna

    A magazine created by Colorado College students as part of the course, FG200 Introduction to Feminist Thought, taught by Assistant Professor Heidi Lewis during Block 7, 2013.

  • Thumbnail for SocSource [2013-2014 Block 1 September]
    SocSource [2013-2014 Block 1 September] by Colorado College. Dept. of Sociology

    Released on the first Friday of each block, SocSource updates its readers on news, events, people and places related to Colorado College Department of Sociology.

  • Thumbnail for SocSource [2013-2014 Block 2 October]
    SocSource [2013-2014 Block 2 October] by Colorado College. Dept. of Sociology

    Released on the first Friday of each block, SocSource updates its readers on news, events, people and places related to Colorado College Department of Sociology.

  • Thumbnail for Reparations theory:  Japanese-Americans, The Civil Liberties Act, and minority group agency in the creation of law
    Reparations theory: Japanese-Americans, The Civil Liberties Act, and minority group agency in the creation of law by Hicks, Eva Teshima

    The Civil Liberties Act of 1988 looked like a bill doomed to fail; it was proposed by, and sought for the benefit of a small racial minority with little political power, under a fiscally conservative Republican administration. No such apology had ever been given to African-Americans or Native-Americans for the injustices suffered. Why, then, did it pass? A content analysis method of the floor debates is used to identify several central themes, three theories are applied in an attempt to explain the bill’s passage. A pluralist model of lawmaking is appealing because of the agency it affords to Japanese- Americans in the bill’s passage, yet naively ignores the obvious structural racism that persists in America. Elite theory addresses this inequality, but to the detriment of Japanese-Americans by robbing them of any influence they exerted in the legislative process. Structural contradiction theory is ultimately most satisfying when improved by the inclusion of an institutional production model. This theory provides a more nuanced and less deterministic theory, while allowing for minority group agency in a singular instance. Through this model we can understand the skillful manner in which Japanese-American interest groups seized the favorable ‘cultural context’ of a country yearning for an affirmation of justice, liberty, and equality. They dexterously framed the Civil Liberties Act as one that would fulfill this need, depicting it as a bill for the common good. This case study is illustrative of the manner in which a historically powerless racial minority could momentarily wield great political power by obscuring their own voice and aligning their own interests with those of the collective.

  • Thumbnail for The dual nature of biraciality : to be at once confined and free
    The dual nature of biraciality : to be at once confined and free by Chin, Alison

    Biracial individuals, as demarcated by having one white and one non-white parent, hold a unique social position in the United States. Situated in a white racial hierarchy, individuals of mixed races are, in some ways, caught between racial lines—they do not embody one racial category but rather two. Given that biracial individuals exist outside of established racial binaries, one is left wondering in what manner they racially identify. While some research argues that raced Americans (that is, those who are raced as non-white) are confined by their racial appearance and hence limited in ethnic identity options (Waters 1990; Gans 1979), more recent research finds that raced Americans experience a degree of opportunity and choice in the expression of an ethnic and/or racial identity (Khanna 2011). My research, situated between these two polar studies, finds that biracial individuals are at once both confined and free. Comprised of eleven interviews with biracial individuals across three racial categories (black, Asian and Latino), I ask: How do biracial individuals racially self-identify? In what manner and to what extent does phenotype affect the way in which individuals choose a particular identity? And how do individuals express their identity through ethnic and/or racial symbols? What I find is that, in support of Waters’ (1990) and Gans’ (1979) assertions, respondents’ phenotypes greatly affect the way in which they racially identify—respondents tend to draw on racial and ethnic symbols opposite their phenotype in order to either fit in or stand out. In particular, I find that phenotypically non-white respondents draw on American ethnicity in order to claim white affiliation and assimilation. At the same time, however, respondents, like Khanna’s (2011), maintain the freedom to draw on symbols of race and ethnicity. And regardless of phenotype, individuals predominately draw on symbols of non-whiteness to claim feelings of being different and unique.

  • Thumbnail for The creation of self through the culture of emotions : identity development at two liberal arts colleges
    The creation of self through the culture of emotions : identity development at two liberal arts colleges by Schneider, Lauren

    Sociologists are starting to understand emotions as a socially constructed phenomenon. Research has been conducted to understand how emotions prevail in every environment, whether it is academic, person, or work settings. However, there is a lack of information gathered regarding emotions during critical transition periods. Based on previous theoretical findings about emotions, there are particular ways students should emote throughout their college experience. This study looks at the display of emotions at two liberal arts colleges. Through survey and focus group research, this thesis found that the colleges were much the same, and the expected differences in gender were not found. The major difference was between the expression and suppression of emotion between freshmen, sophomores, and upperclassmen.

  • Thumbnail for Mental illness as a family constructed object : the reciprocal relationship between individuals with a mental illness and their families
    Mental illness as a family constructed object : the reciprocal relationship between individuals with a mental illness and their families by Kaminsky, Gabrielle

    This paper researches the reciprocal relationship between individuals with a diagnosed mental illness and their families. I interviewed fourteen college students who were diagnosed with depression, anxiety or bipolar disorder and asked them about their relationships with their families. I used a symbolic interactionist perspective to interpret the social construction of mental illness. I found that individuals who were not the only family member diagnosed with a mental illness defined mental illness as a normalized object. As a result, these individuals had a higher perceived sense of self and higher self-esteem. However, individuals who were the only family member diagnosed defined mental illness as an abnormality and therefore, the individuals sense of self was lower.

  • Thumbnail for Maximum weight capacity of leaves used by tent-roosting bats : implications for social structure and plant species usage
    Maximum weight capacity of leaves used by tent-roosting bats : implications for social structure and plant species usage by Parker-Shames, Phoebe Amelia

    Fewer than 2% of bats have the capacity to modify their environment to construct roosts. Tent-roosting bats cut and fold leaves to form roosts called “tents” and often use specific plant species for this purpose. Unlike the caves or hollow trees used by some bats, leaves possess an upper limit on their capacity to support weight. I tested the hypothesis that the maximum weight capacity that leaves can support limits the maximum social group size of bats that roost in them. I tested a secondary hypothesis that the bat Dermanura watsoni would preferentially use the plant species that can support more weight. I conducted research in the Tirimbina Biological Reserve (TBR), Sarapiquí, Costa Rica, between March and April 2012. To test the first hypothesis, I added weight incrementally to new leaves of three plant species until the angle of the leaves fell below that which bats naturally use. Philodendron fragrantissimum and Heliconia imbricata support one-third more weight than Asterogyne martiana. To address the second hypothesis, I determined plant abundance by systematic-random plot sampling along main paths in the reserve and systematically surveyed tents along the same paths. Patterns of leaf use by D. watsoni suggest a preference for A. martiana and complete avoidance of H. imbricata. Dermanura watsoni did not show a preference for plant species that support a greater maximum weight capacity. This study demonstrates that the maximum weight that the leaves can support is similar to the mean social group weight of D. watsoni and Ectophylla alba reported in the literature for these plant species and lower than the maximum reported social group weights. Therefore, it is possible that the maximum weight capacity of the leaves used to construct roosts limits the maximum social group size but may not be an important factor used for plant selection.

  • Thumbnail for The GASP phenotype in Acinetobacter baylyi
    The GASP phenotype in Acinetobacter baylyi by Krych, Leland William

    Competence for natural transformation is the physiological ability of bacteria to take up extracellular DNA. This ability is wielded by over 40 species of bacteria. We hypothesize that competence for natural transformation might be required for the GASP phenotype: a phenomenon by which cells grown to long term stationary phase can out-compete young cells co-incubated with them in stationary phase. In this experiment, we show for the first time that the soil bacteria Acinetobacter baylyi exhibits the GASP phenotype, and that knock out mutants of the gene comP which codes for a prepilin-like protein showed significantly reduced fitness levels during a GASP test when competed against young wild type cells. Knock out mutants of the gene comQ, which codes for a transmembrane protein, showed reduced fitness levels when competed against a young wild type strain in stationary phase but this difference was not significant. Defective GASP responses suggest that natural competence is important for cells to “age” (evolve) normally during long-term stationary phase.

  • Thumbnail for A narratological insight on the journey to an integrated self :  individuation and collective merging in Homer’s Odyssey and James Joyce’s Ulysses
  • Thumbnail for The unknown and empathy : remaining in an empathic stance
    The unknown and empathy : remaining in an empathic stance by Whitnah, Charis Joy

    Two strangers come together to facilitate the therapeutic process. In stepping into a mysterious arena, the analysand and analyst meet in the psychoanalytic treatment room. What expectations does the analysand have of the analyst? What does the analyst hope will happen through treatment? How does the analyst create an emerging psychoanalytic treatment that facilitates healing for the analysand? Through the connection between analysand and analyst, the anaylsand hopefully forms a healthier, vital, and more coherent self. One must ask how the analysand comes to feel more coherent? What are the essential ingredients of a “cure?” In seeking to answer these questions, I have focused this paper on the discussion of empathy. The paper provides a self psychological historical analysis of the concept of empathy. Through turning to the work of Sigmund Freud, Heinz Kohut, Ernest Wolf, Howard Bacal, and Richard Geist, I strive to describe the concept of empathy and discuss how empathy plays a vital role in the psychoanalytic process. I argue that the self psychological psychoanalytic value of empathy has profound and altering effects for the analysand and analyst.

  • Thumbnail for Reading workshop : inspiring readers and not just students who read
    Reading workshop : inspiring readers and not just students who read by Lopez, Loren Micele

    This paper explores the components of Reading Workshop and argues that this curriculum, when coupled with specific classroom practices, has the potential to strengthen students' literacy skills and cultivate a love of reading.

  • Thumbnail for Tattooing identity : an analysis of historical and contemporary tattooing practices among members of the military community
    Tattooing identity : an analysis of historical and contemporary tattooing practices among members of the military community by Frecentese, Victoria M.

    Tattooing as a cultural practice has existed definitively in the archaeological record since the Bronze Age and continues in a diverse array of contemporary cultures. Throughout its extensive history, tattooing has often been closely tied to the military community, as either a mark of prestige or punishment, or through the military’s ability to transfer the practice between cultures. This study investigates tattooing among the contemporary military community in terms of image, location, motivation, and meaning in order to better understand influences of tattooing on identity formation. Quantitative and qualitative data collected through interviews in several tattoo parlors in the Colorado Springs area revealed that 71% of the tattoos observed had no military association in imagery or motivation, compared to 12% with direct military association. The results, when coupled with military tattoo history, indicated a higher level of personal identity assertion than anticipated. This study investigates this phenomenon further and formulates a new hypothesis on tattooing among the military community: the trend of individuality.

  • Thumbnail for Continuity or decline : a bioarchaeological analysis of the quality of life at the Roman city of Sanisera during the Vandal occupation
    Continuity or decline : a bioarchaeological analysis of the quality of life at the Roman city of Sanisera during the Vandal occupation by Luttrell, Elizabeth Marie

    For centuries scholars have assumed that a ubiquitous deterioration in quality of life occurred throughout the former Western Roman Empire following its collapse in the 5th century AD. This presumption is largely the result of a lack of understanding of the common people and the so-called “barbarians.” My research addresses this gap in the literature through the bioarchaeological analysis of the impact of the Vandal occupation of the Roman city of Sanisera on the island of Menorca, Spain during the 5th-6th centuries AD. The frequencies of osteological indicators of pathological conditions are calculated and compared to frequencies at other sites throughout the Empire dated to before, during, and after the barbarian invasions and collapse of the Western Roman Empire. This data is used to determine relative quality of life and the level of continuity in health between Roman and Vandal rule. The indicators analyzed are dental caries, dental calculus, abscesses, antemortem tooth loss (AMTL), periodontal disease, dental enamel hypoplasias (DEH), traumas including fractures and dislocations, periostitis, osteomyelitis, degenerative joint disease, osteophytosis, osteoarthritis, and osteoporosis. The results indicate a high rate of disease at Sanisera, likely as a result of the plague that swept the region during this period. The diet was relatively balanced and nutritious, and the level of mechanical stress was normal for a rural, non-mechanized society. Overall, these results indicate that the average level of health at Sanisera was relatively good for a rural, non-mechanized society from antiquity. The level of health seen at Sanisera is consistent with other sites prior to the collapse of the Empire, implying that the Vandal occupation of the island did not result in a decline in the quality of life of its inhabitants.

  • Thumbnail for A model of the effects of casual gaming on the home video game console market
    A model of the effects of casual gaming on the home video game console market by Larrabee, Tyler Kendrick

    The home video game industry has become one of the largest industries in the United States; until recently it has seen steady growth. With the introduction and rapid growth of smartphone and tablet gaming there has been a drop off in sales for the industry. This paper defines the industry as it was and creates theoretical framework that attempts to explain the ways that tablet and smartphone games could be affecting the home video game console industry. The model uses a finite horizon sequential game model to capture the effects of competition within the industry and heterogeneity of consumer console preferences as well as effects of smartphone/ tablet computer ownership on consumer preferences.

  • Thumbnail for Factors that drive attendance in Major League Soccer
    Factors that drive attendance in Major League Soccer by Fechter, Matthew Evan

    Major League Soccer is a growing league within the United States. Although soccer is not an American sport, it is growing increasingly more popular. Using a simple OLS regression this thesis provides insight into factors that drive attendance in Major League Soccer. The purpose of this thesis is to determine the factors that increase attendance to help the struggling franchises grow their fan base.