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  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2013-01-22]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2013-01-22] by Walden, Jacob , Mia, Mohammad

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Executive Council meeting held on Janurary 22, 2013. Members present include: President Nathan Lee, Student Concerns Vice President Charis Whitnah, Outreach Vice President Pat Knecht, and Constitutional Vice President Elliott Mamet.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Full Council minutes [2013-03-07]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Full Council minutes [2013-03-07] by Mia, Mohammad

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Full Council meeting held on March 7, 2013.

  • Thumbnail for The purple paper : politics monthly [2013-2014 Block 2]
    The purple paper : politics monthly [2013-2014 Block 2]

    The Purple Paper : Politics Monthly is the newsletter of the CC Dems, CC Repubs and the Collaborative for Community Engagement.

  • Thumbnail for The purple paper : politics monthly [2012-2013 Block 8]
    The purple paper : politics monthly [2012-2013 Block 8]

    The Purple Paper : Politics Monthly is the newsletter of the CC Dems, CC Repubs and the Collaborative for Community Engagement.

  • Thumbnail for Harlem Shake on Frontier Flight 157
    Harlem Shake on Frontier Flight 157

    The Colorado College Ultimate Frisbee Team performs the Harlem Shake while on board Frontier Airlines flight 157, on February 15, 2013.

  • Thumbnail for Microclimatological feedbacks at treeline: Is treeline structure modifying the local microclimate?
    Microclimatological feedbacks at treeline: Is treeline structure modifying the local microclimate? by Dickson, Chris C.

    Recent study of altitudinal treeline advance has revealed that increasing seasonal temperatures only partly explain the processes that influence treeline structure and elevation. Microsite modifications, induced by the structure of the treeline, may in fact play a large role in regulating the microclimate, creating more favorable conditions for further seedling establishment and recruitment near the treeline. To explore these modifications, previous research on Pikes Peak has compared heating dynamics within a treeline microclimate to the microclimate of an adjacent rockslide at an identical elevation. Observations indicated that the treeline heats up faster and to a higher maximum temperature than the rockslide nearly every day of the study period (Johnson, 2011). Potential mechanisms for this differential heating were explored, however only the sheltering potential of the trees to reduce winds proved worthy of further investigation (Anderson, 2012). To expand upon these findings, this study aims to verify the presence of differential heating between treeline and rockslide, investigate the role of sheltering to reduce heat loss within treeline, and explore to what extent this sheltering could extend beyond the treeline’s leading edge. First, this study found that temperatures within the treeline were on average ~7C warmer than the rockslide from 15cm above the ground to 10cm deep within the soil, a critical habitat for seedling establishment (Körner, 1998). Furthermore, this study reveals that the magnitude of differential heating increases throughout the growing season, exhibiting larger differences later in the season. These findings indicate that, despite decreasing solar input late in the season, the treeline has a higher capacity to retain heat than the rockslide and prolongs favorable growing conditions later into the summer months. To investigate how sheltering may play a role in holding heat within the treeline, the zero-plane displacement was calculated for the treeline, rockslide, and upper tundra. Results indicate that treeline form shelters a boundary layer of warm air close to the ground that could enable increased heat storage within the treeline’s soil. Furthermore, this sheltering effect extends beyond the treeline’s leading edge and modifies the tundra microclimate by reducing wind effects in lee of the treeline. This mechanism of sheltering could create a positive feedback loop in which microclimatological modifications, induced by the trees presence, allow for continual growth beyond the forest boundary.

  • Thumbnail for aFeminist [2012-2013 v.  1 no.  1 April]
    aFeminist [2012-2013 v. 1 no. 1 April] by Charles, Swetha , O'Connor-Bethune, Maeve

    A magazine created by Colorado College students as part of the course, FG200 Introduction to Feminist Thought, taught by Assistant Professor Heidi Lewis during Block 7, 2013.

  • Thumbnail for Vice, family, and development in Colorado's mines
    Vice, family, and development in Colorado's mines by Baxter, Robert Gregga

    An exploration of the way families influenced educational, community, and organized labor movements in Colorado's mining towns. The essay looks at three families in Cripple Creek, Creede, and Leadville, Colorado and uses their experiences to ground the narrative.

  • Thumbnail for The establishment of an African-American community in Pueblo, Colorado by 1930
    The establishment of an African-American community in Pueblo, Colorado by 1930 by Conatore, Lois Eliane

    There are bits and pieces writings and compilations, but there are very few comprehensive works that tell how and why the African-American population of Pueblo, at one time a greater number than the African- American population of the capital city of Denver, became settled and established in the “Steel City.” That is what this paper will attempt to do: provide a comprehensive perspective on the establishment of an African- American population in Pueblo, Colorado by 1930.

  • Thumbnail for Reparations theory:  Japanese-Americans, The Civil Liberties Act, and minority group agency in the creation of law
    Reparations theory: Japanese-Americans, The Civil Liberties Act, and minority group agency in the creation of law by Hicks, Eva Teshima

    The Civil Liberties Act of 1988 looked like a bill doomed to fail; it was proposed by, and sought for the benefit of a small racial minority with little political power, under a fiscally conservative Republican administration. No such apology had ever been given to African-Americans or Native-Americans for the injustices suffered. Why, then, did it pass? A content analysis method of the floor debates is used to identify several central themes, three theories are applied in an attempt to explain the bill’s passage. A pluralist model of lawmaking is appealing because of the agency it affords to Japanese- Americans in the bill’s passage, yet naively ignores the obvious structural racism that persists in America. Elite theory addresses this inequality, but to the detriment of Japanese-Americans by robbing them of any influence they exerted in the legislative process. Structural contradiction theory is ultimately most satisfying when improved by the inclusion of an institutional production model. This theory provides a more nuanced and less deterministic theory, while allowing for minority group agency in a singular instance. Through this model we can understand the skillful manner in which Japanese-American interest groups seized the favorable ‘cultural context’ of a country yearning for an affirmation of justice, liberty, and equality. They dexterously framed the Civil Liberties Act as one that would fulfill this need, depicting it as a bill for the common good. This case study is illustrative of the manner in which a historically powerless racial minority could momentarily wield great political power by obscuring their own voice and aligning their own interests with those of the collective.

  • Thumbnail for Cumulative control : an analysis of cumulative abuse and control tactics in the gendering of intimate partner violence victimization and perpetration
    Cumulative control : an analysis of cumulative abuse and control tactics in the gendering of intimate partner violence victimization and perpetration by Michaels, Elizabeth Katahdin

    This study utilizes shelter intake survey data from TESSA, a domestic violence resource agency in Colorado Springs, Colorado, to analyze the relationships between victim demographics and experiences with various forms of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV). This study also addresses Michael Johnson’s Intimate Terrorism and Situational Couple Violence typologies and analyses the relationship between gender and control among IPV victims and perpetrators. Finally, this thesis considers the question of cumulative abuse as an indicator of abuse severity. Findings suggest that when the role of controlling behavior is considered, both gender-symmetrical and gender-asymmetrical forms of abuse can be identified in one sample. Specifically, highly controlling behaviors are more often perpetrated by males against female victims, but more event-specific and less controlling behaviors are perpetrated and experienced by males and females at roughly the same rates. Finally, findings suggest that cumulative abuse may be a proxy for control in predicting abuse severity.

  • Thumbnail for Urban agriculture : a transnational alternative economic pathway for Hmong refugees
    Urban agriculture : a transnational alternative economic pathway for Hmong refugees by Cirullo, Katherine Alexis

    Within the field of migration studies, the study of transnationalism is a relatively new concept with a building body of empirical research. There is ongoing debate over the meaning of the term, its significance as an area of study, and its legitimacy as a concept that can be applied to future generations of migrants. In this paper, I use data gathered from my ethnographic research to present an analysis of a Hmong transnational community in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. I illustrate the relationship between their history as a diaspora (and their ascribed refugee identity), their agrarian background, and the urban agricultural movement. I propose that, as refugees, the Hmong exhibit a strong desire to assert their agrarian identity within United States. Thus, they maintain a transnational identity that is reinforced through urban agriculture. Urban agriculture is then an economic pathway in which the Hmong simultaneously assimilate into society and maintain home-country ties. It facilitates the maintenance of a Hmong transnational identity and the strengthening of their transnational community.

  • Thumbnail for On the threshold : the liminality of Asian Americaness in American cinema
    On the threshold : the liminality of Asian Americaness in American cinema by Kanemori, Taylor Marie

    An analysis of Asian roles in American cinema revealed a complex portrayal of Asian Americans liminality. Seventeen films derived from “Asian American Film 101” (2011) a list created by Michael Kang were used to conduct this research. The literature concluded there were limited spaces for Asians in Hollywood: women shown as hypersexual and men a meek and asexual. Using content analysis from these seventeen significant Asian American Oscar nominated films, the research showed the presentation of Asian Americaness in a state of transition. These films showed the Western perception of a liminal state between their Asianess and their Americaness.

  • Thumbnail for Maximum weight capacity of leaves used by tent-roosting bats : implications for social structure and plant species usage
    Maximum weight capacity of leaves used by tent-roosting bats : implications for social structure and plant species usage by Parker-Shames, Phoebe Amelia

    Fewer than 2% of bats have the capacity to modify their environment to construct roosts. Tent-roosting bats cut and fold leaves to form roosts called “tents” and often use specific plant species for this purpose. Unlike the caves or hollow trees used by some bats, leaves possess an upper limit on their capacity to support weight. I tested the hypothesis that the maximum weight capacity that leaves can support limits the maximum social group size of bats that roost in them. I tested a secondary hypothesis that the bat Dermanura watsoni would preferentially use the plant species that can support more weight. I conducted research in the Tirimbina Biological Reserve (TBR), Sarapiquí, Costa Rica, between March and April 2012. To test the first hypothesis, I added weight incrementally to new leaves of three plant species until the angle of the leaves fell below that which bats naturally use. Philodendron fragrantissimum and Heliconia imbricata support one-third more weight than Asterogyne martiana. To address the second hypothesis, I determined plant abundance by systematic-random plot sampling along main paths in the reserve and systematically surveyed tents along the same paths. Patterns of leaf use by D. watsoni suggest a preference for A. martiana and complete avoidance of H. imbricata. Dermanura watsoni did not show a preference for plant species that support a greater maximum weight capacity. This study demonstrates that the maximum weight that the leaves can support is similar to the mean social group weight of D. watsoni and Ectophylla alba reported in the literature for these plant species and lower than the maximum reported social group weights. Therefore, it is possible that the maximum weight capacity of the leaves used to construct roosts limits the maximum social group size but may not be an important factor used for plant selection.

  • Thumbnail for Runaway metabolism in crickets : analysis of anomalous CO2 release after heat-induced death
    Runaway metabolism in crickets : analysis of anomalous CO2 release after heat-induced death by Meigher, Stephen Gregory

    Ten to fifteen minutes following death, a large release of CO2 is produced in many species when killed by high temperature. Studied in mosquitoes, hissing cockroaches, grasshoppers, and desert harvester ants, this post-mortal peak (PMP) appears to be temperature-dependent and, to our knowledge, does not occur in insects killed by means other than high temperature. Four effects were applied to common house crickets (Acheta domestica) to analyze the origin and properties of the PMP. First, it was shown that the PMP does not occur without oxygen. Second, post-mortal CO2 release was studied as a function of temperature-exposure following death and it was established that the phenomenon is dependent on extreme temperatures and runs to completion when exposed to temperatures above 60°C. Third, basic and buffered solutions were employed to assess the possible involvement of dissolved HCO3- (bicarbonate), the dissolved form of CO2, in production of the peak. Hemolymph factors like bicarbonate did not appear to have an effect on the PMP. Finally, exposure to hydrogen cyanide inhibited the PMP, demonstrating the involvement of mitochondria and cytochrome c oxidase in particular. Together, these results rule out any effect of hemolymph or possible CO2 stores in the body of an insect on the PMP. The PMP occurs as an aerobic mitochondrial reaction that requires high initiation temperatures. We believe that this underlying cause may be mitochondrial breakdown at high-temperatures. More specifically, fluidity of the mitochondrial membranes likely increases with high heat, disabling the established proton gradient and ATP production. The resultant accumulation of electron carriers allows for cyclic, but futile operation of the citric acid cycle and electron transport chain with remaining pyruvate stores.

  • Thumbnail for A failure to atone : object relations theory in Orestes’ sacrifice of sanity
    A failure to atone : object relations theory in Orestes’ sacrifice of sanity by Mitsunaga-Whitten, Michiko Audrey

    As he feels the inescapable brunt of duty bound with crime, Orestes, son 0f Agamemnon and Clytemnestra, declares: If the serpent came from the same place as I, and slept in the bands that swaddled, me, and its jaws spread wide for the breast that nursed me into life and clots stained the milk, mother’s milk, and she cried in fear and agony- so be it. Aesch. Ag. 1 Spurred by Apollo, Electra, responsibility, and omens, Orestes is coerced to commit revengeful matricide. What seems an ancient family feud in The Oresteia is a timeless and modern issue, that yields itself to fruitful analysis when seen through the lens of infantile developmental stages in Melanie Klein’s object relations theory. Klein herself reflected upon The Oresteia and its correspondence to object relations in her book, Envy and Gratitude (1984). As if Aeschylus held a modern understanding of the depth and development of the unconscious, his characters are paradigmatic of the object relationships Klein describes. The cardinal conclusion Klein arrives at in her psychoanalytic criticism of Aeschylus’ trilogy is that Orestes’ acquittal in the third book, The Eumenides, heals and restores his mental state after intense familial trauma. I, on the other hand, propose that there is an essential feature of Orestes’ trial that forbids a healthy psychic recovery to occur for the unfortunate prince.

  • Thumbnail for A narratological insight on the journey to an integrated self :  individuation and collective merging in Homer’s Odyssey and James Joyce’s Ulysses
  • Thumbnail for Sage and Prophet : the Chinese Muslim intellectual movement of the Late Ming and Early Qing Dynasties
    Sage and Prophet : the Chinese Muslim intellectual movement of the Late Ming and Early Qing Dynasties by Lovelace, Garrison

    This thesis explores the Chinese Muslim intellectual movement that lasted from roughly 1630-1730 CE and how those in the movement constructed an Islamic school of Confucian thought and a Chinese Muslim intellectual Identity. In the process, Chinese Muslim intellectuals, including the scholar Liu Zhi, made the case that the Prophet Muhammad was a Confucian sage and his teachings belonged in the Confucian canon. This thesis also explores the relationship between Chinese Muslims and the Qing state in an effort to explain why their teachings did not spread to the rest of Chinese society.

  • Thumbnail for The exploitation of Pushkin’s image in the making of Russian identity
    The exploitation of Pushkin’s image in the making of Russian identity by Khazova, Tatyana

    Alexander Pushkin is considered the father of Russian literature. Works such as Boris Godunov and Evgenii Onegin help reveal his perception of what it is to be Russian, and Pushkin's relationship with Alexander I and Nikolai I demonstrate his way of attempting to reconcile the disconnect between the people and the tsar. It is important to understand that Pushkin as a writer is different from the myth that people have associated him with. Misunderstanding who Pushkin is has made it easy for leaders such as Stalin to manipulate the idea of Pushkin in order to control and upkeep morale of the people. The following is an attempt at understanding who Pushkin was and what his beliefs were, and in doing so comprehending why it is so easy for people to elevate and equate this particular individual's life with a martyr, whose image came to represent Russian national identity.

  • Thumbnail for Excess and absence : an apophatic approach to Nikolai Gogol’s fiction
    Excess and absence : an apophatic approach to Nikolai Gogol’s fiction by Trippe, Marta

    This essay investigates Gogol’s fiction through the lens of apophaticism, a theology embraced by the hesychasts of the Eastern Orthodox Church that utilized the negation of language in order to come into divine unity with God. An apophatic approach not only gives Gogol’s readers a new perspective from which to analyze his fiction, but also explains the tragicomedy of Nikolai Gogol’s life as a whole.

  • Thumbnail for Asian Studies program : semester in Asia : Shanghai, China Spring 2014
    Asian Studies program : semester in Asia : Shanghai, China Spring 2014

    Poster created to inform Colorado College students about an opportunity to study in Shanghai, China during Spring semester, 2014.

  • Thumbnail for Continuity or decline : a bioarchaeological analysis of the quality of life at the Roman city of Sanisera during the Vandal occupation
    Continuity or decline : a bioarchaeological analysis of the quality of life at the Roman city of Sanisera during the Vandal occupation by Luttrell, Elizabeth Marie

    For centuries scholars have assumed that a ubiquitous deterioration in quality of life occurred throughout the former Western Roman Empire following its collapse in the 5th century AD. This presumption is largely the result of a lack of understanding of the common people and the so-called “barbarians.” My research addresses this gap in the literature through the bioarchaeological analysis of the impact of the Vandal occupation of the Roman city of Sanisera on the island of Menorca, Spain during the 5th-6th centuries AD. The frequencies of osteological indicators of pathological conditions are calculated and compared to frequencies at other sites throughout the Empire dated to before, during, and after the barbarian invasions and collapse of the Western Roman Empire. This data is used to determine relative quality of life and the level of continuity in health between Roman and Vandal rule. The indicators analyzed are dental caries, dental calculus, abscesses, antemortem tooth loss (AMTL), periodontal disease, dental enamel hypoplasias (DEH), traumas including fractures and dislocations, periostitis, osteomyelitis, degenerative joint disease, osteophytosis, osteoarthritis, and osteoporosis. The results indicate a high rate of disease at Sanisera, likely as a result of the plague that swept the region during this period. The diet was relatively balanced and nutritious, and the level of mechanical stress was normal for a rural, non-mechanized society. Overall, these results indicate that the average level of health at Sanisera was relatively good for a rural, non-mechanized society from antiquity. The level of health seen at Sanisera is consistent with other sites prior to the collapse of the Empire, implying that the Vandal occupation of the island did not result in a decline in the quality of life of its inhabitants.

  • Thumbnail for The efficacy of various hydraulic fracturing techniques in the Denver Basin
    The efficacy of various hydraulic fracturing techniques in the Denver Basin by Diamond, Colby G.

    Hydraulic fracturing is a stimulation technique that allows for the commercial exploitation of oil and gas from reservoirs that would be otherwise uneconomical. Designing the fracture stimulation is a complicated process with many considerations, and better designs will ultimately improve production performance. Using fracture stimulation data and oil and gas production data for 33 wells in the Denver Basin, OLS regressions help determine which fracture stimulation design variables create the largest increases in post-fracture oil and gas production. This study finds that post-fracture cumulative production, particularly gas, is affected by the completion type—whether a new or existing geological formation in the well is fractured; the fracture type—the specific fracture treatment being used, such as a hybrid frac or water frac; and the average injection rate of the fracture treatment. These results help elucidate which treatment variables have the largest effect on production performance.

  • Thumbnail for Executive compensation, board control and the 2007 financial crisis
    Executive compensation, board control and the 2007 financial crisis by Ballance, Benjamin Blake

    During the current financial crisis there is a large amount of scrutiny surrounding executive compensation packages. The purpose of this thesis is finding an understanding of executive compensation based around the makeup of the board of directors. We examine firms from the S&P 100 investigating the relationship between CEO compensation and the makeup of the board of directors. For this end, we examine different pieces of CEO compensation packages: salary, options awards and stock awards, in relation to salary and as standalone pieces. We use OLS regressions to see if the make-up of the board demonstrates a significant relationship with CEO compensation. The purpose of this examination is to determine what effect, if any, the makeup of the board of directors has on deciding executive compensation.

  • Thumbnail for Determinants of FDI from traditional versus nontraditional source countries
    Determinants of FDI from traditional versus nontraditional source countries by Price, Christin

    Inflows of foreign direct investment spur growth in the receiving country and cause positive spillovers of technology and skill throughout the entire economy. FDI comes from source countries that can be broadly classified as traditional and nontraditional investors. Traditional refers to wealthy and developed economies, while nontraditional refers to emerging economies in the process of developing. The overarching hypothesis is that nontraditional source countries are less risk-averse than their wealthier counterparts. This is believed to be the case because multinational enterprises located in these regions are familiar with political and economic uncertainties at home; therefore, less than satisfactory investment conditions in the host economy abroad do not deter their interest. If FDI is originating in a more diverse set of source countries, does this mean receiving nations have more opportunities to attract FDI and subsequently experience positive growth? We test how the two source country types respond to different elements of risk using a random effects generalized least squares regression. Our main empirical findings support that political instability indeed does not deter FDI flows originating in nontraditional source countries, however quality of transport and trade-related infrastructure within the receiving economy does determine FDI flows from both source country types. Overall, we strongly emphasize that a blanket generalization concerning investment behavior between different types of source countries cannot be made, and encourage more research to be done in this relatively new field of study.