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  • Thumbnail for I [love] female orgasm : talk sex, sexuality and pleasure with sex educators Kate Weinberg and Marshall Miller
    I [love] female orgasm : talk sex, sexuality and pleasure with sex educators Kate Weinberg and Marshall Miller by Johnson, Savannah A.

    This poster was created for the event "I <3 (Female) Orgasm", held on April 24, 2013 at 7:00 p.m., in the Cornerstone Theater on the Colorado College Campus. The event included a presentation by guest speakers Marshall Miller and Kate Weinberg. The event is sponsored by: OrgasmiCC, CCSGA, President Tiefenthaler’s Discretionary Fund, Heather Horton and the Wellness Resource Center, The Sociology Department, The Feminist and Gender Studies Department, Advocates for Choice, and The Psychology Department.

  • Thumbnail for You want 8th block to be sexellent?
    You want 8th block to be sexellent? by Johnson, Savannah A.

    This poster was created for the event "I <3 (Female) Orgasm", held on April 24, 2013 at 7:00 p.m., in the Cornerstone Theater on the Colorado College Campus. The event included a presentation by guest speakers Marshall Miller and Kate Weinberg.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College bulletin [2013 November]
    Colorado College bulletin [2013 November] by Colorado College

    A publication for alumni, parents, and friends of Colorado College. Published quarterly per calendar year.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2013-02-18]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2013-02-18] by Walden, Jacob

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Executive Council meeting held on February 18, 2013. Members present include: President Nathan Lee, Student Concerns Vice President Charis Whitnah, Outreach Vice President Pat Knecht, and Constitutional Vice President Elliott Mamet.

  • Thumbnail for The purple paper : politics monthly [2012-2013 Block 5]
    The purple paper : politics monthly [2012-2013 Block 5]

    The Purple Paper : Politics Monthly is the newsletter of the CC Dems, and CC Repubs and the Collaborative for Community Engagement.

  • Thumbnail for The purple paper : politics monthly [2013-2014 Block 3]
    The purple paper : politics monthly [2013-2014 Block 3]

    The Purple Paper : Politics Monthly is the newsletter of the CC Dems, CC Repubs and the Collaborative for Community Engagement.

  • Thumbnail for Reconciling institutional levels of water governance and management for the Monterey Peninsula water supply
    Reconciling institutional levels of water governance and management for the Monterey Peninsula water supply by Hall, Andrew

    Water managers in the West are faced with multiple and compounding challenges from climate change, spatial-administrative complexity, legal uncertainty and increasing demand from population, industry and environment needs. This article thus assesses the current state of water management in California by specifically looking at the fragmentation of governance and management and the variable management schemes proposed to solve the problems. As current management has resulted in delays and failures, new political factions and economic and environmental burdens have added new stresses for water managers. My study area is the Central Coast of California specifically the geographic region of the Monterey Bay, with a specific focus on the Monterey Peninsula (MP), Carmel Bay and South Monterey Bay Region. The methodology consists of a qualitative examination of water governance and management responses in the region through interviews, analysis of documents and materials, and direct observations of practices. The results demonstrate that decentralized management in CA has led to multiple dimensions of jurisdictional fragmentation and legal uncertainty relevant to all water managers in the state. Furthermore, the paradigm shift that is taking place in water management towards a more integrative and adaptive framework is hampered by these barriers and has been slow to take effect. Thus, further research is necessary to monitor this shift and to document ways to overcome current legal and political-administrative barriers.

  • Thumbnail for Establishing community gardens for long-term success
    Establishing community gardens for long-term success by Yemma, Melanie

    Urban agriculture has had a strong presence in American cities throughout history, whether from concerns of food security or desires for green spaces. In the past two decades, gardens have made a large comeback due to grassroots and community desire to build community and partake in the local food movement. Common literature has agreed on the benefits that gardens can provide for cities, but no study has found what it specifically takes to establish gardens successfully, in order for their benefits to consistently show for the long-term. This study determines what factors are necessary to establish community gardens with longevity in mind. Through extensive analysis of existing literature, this study finds that the three largest factors for establishing and maintaining community gardens are community interest, support for resources, and organized structure. This study then examines how these factors are specifically at play in Colorado Springs, as the city’s budding interest in gardening makes for an exemplary case study. For Colorado Springs, this study finds that while community interest and mechanisms for resource support are present when it comes to establishing gardens, in terms of longevity, a lack of consistent structure for supporting and maintaining community gardens could hinder the longevity of community gardens. It is proposed that more organization and structure for the gardens, especially in regards to leadership development, can promote the success of these gardens, as well as other gardens nation-wide, for the future by making gardens more self-sustaining.

  • Thumbnail for Check yourself [2012-2013 Block 7]
    Check yourself [2012-2013 Block 7] by Naden, Anna , Hampson, Tucker

    A magazine created by Colorado College students as part of the course, FG200 Introduction to Feminist Thought, taught by Assistant Professor Heidi Lewis during Block 7, 2013.

  • Thumbnail for The slave and the courtesan : sorcery and cultural encounters in early modern Malta
    The slave and the courtesan : sorcery and cultural encounters in early modern Malta by Bean, Owen Randall

    The present essay examines the traffic in magical goods and services between Maltese prostitutes and Muslim slaves in seventeenth-century Malta, as it is represented in the Archives of the Inquisition in Malta. Past analyses of these archives have focused on these interactions as elements of superstition and folk religion in early modern Malta. This essay asserts that the magical trade provided a form of common engagement between slaves and prostitutes as subaltern groups. In my analysis, I use close readings of denunciations before the Maltese Inquisition and historical examples from other scholarship. This essay will be useful to those interested in Maltese history, Christian and Muslim encounters, and the problems of universalism in post-colonial discourse.

  • Thumbnail for Re-imagining Greek identity in an era of mass migration
    Re-imagining Greek identity in an era of mass migration by Angelides, Philip

    Greek nationalism emerging out of the Enlightenment stressed the primordial belief that Modern Greeks are the descendents of the Ancient Greeks. This type of nationalism was exclusionary and repressive towards foreigners, yet is pervasive in contemporary Greek immigration policy. Greek immigration is incredibly important today because in 2010 alone, 90 percent of detected illegal immigrants in the European Union entered through Greece, a large percentage of these being Muslim immigrants. In this paper I contend that political rights must be granted to Muslim immigrants that call Greece their home, for ethnocultural differences should not preclude political, economic or social integration. Individual characteristics of the members of the community should not determine whether they are worthy of political rights or not. Terms for immigrants should rather be defined in political and institutional terms rather than in ethnic and cultural; only though recognizing the ability for Muslims to participate in the political and economic life of the Greek state can peaceful coexistence materialize. This paper, thus, is particularly significant because it exposes the Greek path dependency on a flawed immigration policy and suggests ways for reconciling national identity in an era of mass migration.

  • Thumbnail for La Virgen de la Candelaria como un vehículo para la construcción de la identidad
    La Virgen de la Candelaria como un vehículo para la construcción de la identidad by Brockland, Margaret

    Este trabajo propone dilucidar el papel de un artefacto en la narración construida de la identidad, dada la natura adaptable de una figura religiosa, la Virgen de Copacabana. En la lucha por control de la narrativa social, me refiero a dos momentos históricos, la colonización y la globalización. Ambas establecen la necesidad de construir una identidad, y aluden a la complejidad de su construcción. Trabajo con la suposición que la identidad es una construcción narrada. Mi argumento central consiste en dos puntos importantes: Primero, que la Virgen es un vehículo que legitima la expresión de la identidad; y segundo, que la Virgen nos ayuda a entender que dicha identidad narrada está en un proceso dinámico y continuo de construcción.

  • Thumbnail for A quantitative study of wealthy youth subcultures : relationships and identity
    A quantitative study of wealthy youth subcultures : relationships and identity by Suzukamo, Alison

    Using the subcultural framework from the Center for Contemporary Cultural Studies (CCCS) and Marxist definitions of class this study seeks to better understand upper class youth subcultures. It argues that through identity tied to the parent culture upper class youth form subcultures of symbolic resistance around relationships both romantic and familial. This study uses quantitative analysis of a survey taken at Colorado College. Gender was statistically significant when determining respondents feelings and actions around relationships. Young women were attempting to resist the dominant discourse while young men were complicit, proving gender as a currently relevant subculture. Overall, class was not statistically significant. The analysis draws on Muggleton’s (2000) theory of neo-tribalism and hypothesis that class is no longer relevant to post modern youth. In the end, participating in youth subcultures gives the youth a sense of resistance, however, is a futile effort as subcultures are re-commodified by their dominant culture and rendered harmless without any real change to the structures of power.

  • Thumbnail for The transnational politics of Uganda’s anti-homosexuality bill : competing networks and movement dynamics
    The transnational politics of Uganda’s anti-homosexuality bill : competing networks and movement dynamics by Speyer, Ashley

    Transnational advocacy networks (TANs) play an important role in restructuring global governance and maintaining international norms. Recent literature has amassed highlighting the role of transnational advocacy networks, movements, and coalitions in the promotion of international human rights norms. Drawing on social movement theory and literature on transnational advocacy networks, this paper analyzes the dynamics of transnational movement activity surrounding Uganda’s Anti-Homosexuality Bill. I argue that Ugandan human rights activists strategize with international actors to both strengthen the local movement and conceal Western power. Secondly, the case in Uganda highlights the presence of competing networks working to both promote and limit LGBT rights. Although Ugandan human rights activists are able to overcome traditional North-South power imbalances to a certain extent, they rely on the international community’s implicit pressure and structural power to exhibit influence over the Ugandan government.

  • Thumbnail for SocSource [2013-2014 Block 1 September]
    SocSource [2013-2014 Block 1 September] by Colorado College. Dept. of Sociology

    Released on the first Friday of each block, SocSource updates its readers on news, events, people and places related to Colorado College Department of Sociology.

  • Thumbnail for Maximum weight capacity of leaves used by tent-roosting bats : implications for social structure and plant species usage
    Maximum weight capacity of leaves used by tent-roosting bats : implications for social structure and plant species usage by Parker-Shames, Phoebe Amelia

    Fewer than 2% of bats have the capacity to modify their environment to construct roosts. Tent-roosting bats cut and fold leaves to form roosts called “tents” and often use specific plant species for this purpose. Unlike the caves or hollow trees used by some bats, leaves possess an upper limit on their capacity to support weight. I tested the hypothesis that the maximum weight capacity that leaves can support limits the maximum social group size of bats that roost in them. I tested a secondary hypothesis that the bat Dermanura watsoni would preferentially use the plant species that can support more weight. I conducted research in the Tirimbina Biological Reserve (TBR), Sarapiquí, Costa Rica, between March and April 2012. To test the first hypothesis, I added weight incrementally to new leaves of three plant species until the angle of the leaves fell below that which bats naturally use. Philodendron fragrantissimum and Heliconia imbricata support one-third more weight than Asterogyne martiana. To address the second hypothesis, I determined plant abundance by systematic-random plot sampling along main paths in the reserve and systematically surveyed tents along the same paths. Patterns of leaf use by D. watsoni suggest a preference for A. martiana and complete avoidance of H. imbricata. Dermanura watsoni did not show a preference for plant species that support a greater maximum weight capacity. This study demonstrates that the maximum weight that the leaves can support is similar to the mean social group weight of D. watsoni and Ectophylla alba reported in the literature for these plant species and lower than the maximum reported social group weights. Therefore, it is possible that the maximum weight capacity of the leaves used to construct roosts limits the maximum social group size but may not be an important factor used for plant selection.

  • Thumbnail for Runaway metabolism in crickets : analysis of anomalous CO2 release after heat-induced death
    Runaway metabolism in crickets : analysis of anomalous CO2 release after heat-induced death by Meigher, Stephen Gregory

    Ten to fifteen minutes following death, a large release of CO2 is produced in many species when killed by high temperature. Studied in mosquitoes, hissing cockroaches, grasshoppers, and desert harvester ants, this post-mortal peak (PMP) appears to be temperature-dependent and, to our knowledge, does not occur in insects killed by means other than high temperature. Four effects were applied to common house crickets (Acheta domestica) to analyze the origin and properties of the PMP. First, it was shown that the PMP does not occur without oxygen. Second, post-mortal CO2 release was studied as a function of temperature-exposure following death and it was established that the phenomenon is dependent on extreme temperatures and runs to completion when exposed to temperatures above 60°C. Third, basic and buffered solutions were employed to assess the possible involvement of dissolved HCO3- (bicarbonate), the dissolved form of CO2, in production of the peak. Hemolymph factors like bicarbonate did not appear to have an effect on the PMP. Finally, exposure to hydrogen cyanide inhibited the PMP, demonstrating the involvement of mitochondria and cytochrome c oxidase in particular. Together, these results rule out any effect of hemolymph or possible CO2 stores in the body of an insect on the PMP. The PMP occurs as an aerobic mitochondrial reaction that requires high initiation temperatures. We believe that this underlying cause may be mitochondrial breakdown at high-temperatures. More specifically, fluidity of the mitochondrial membranes likely increases with high heat, disabling the established proton gradient and ATP production. The resultant accumulation of electron carriers allows for cyclic, but futile operation of the citric acid cycle and electron transport chain with remaining pyruvate stores.

  • Thumbnail for Enhancing second language acquisition in the elementary classroom
    Enhancing second language acquisition in the elementary classroom by Thirkell, Deanna

    Students who have the opportunity to learn another language in elementary school are not only shown to score higher on standardized tests in math and English language arts, but will also increase their fluency through daily exposure to a world language in a variety of avenues in the classroom, through availability of literature in the second language, and through partnering with students of a different grade level to explore the language together.

  • Thumbnail for Judith Leyster : a master worth remembering
    Judith Leyster : a master worth remembering by Dick, Mariell Louise , Dick-Valdez, Mariell Louise

    This thesis explores Northern Renaissance painter Judith Leyster as an influential female artist of the seventeenth century. Her contributions to the art world as a citizen of the Dutch Republic are unprecedented and commendable. Two of her most prized works are The Proposition and her Self-Portrait. Both of these works are explored in this thesis to better understand Judith’s role as both a market artist and female artist in a male dominant world. The Proposition, a painting embedded with symbolism and mystery, touches upon gender roles, domesticity, and prostitution. Meanwhile, Judith’s Self-Portrait is understood to be Judith’ personal manifesto. Both paintings shed light on Judith’s character and skill. A true “Leading Star,” Judith not only became a master artist during her lifetime, but she also achieved incredible success despite her gender. Judith remains a mystery to many art historians due to her enigmatic past, but through viewing and analyzing her artwork, she is being rediscovered and reinterpreted. My hope is that Judith continues to interest art historians for years to come. She is undoubtedly a master worth remembering.

  • Thumbnail for Sage and Prophet : the Chinese Muslim intellectual movement of the Late Ming and Early Qing Dynasties
    Sage and Prophet : the Chinese Muslim intellectual movement of the Late Ming and Early Qing Dynasties by Lovelace, Garrison

    This thesis explores the Chinese Muslim intellectual movement that lasted from roughly 1630-1730 CE and how those in the movement constructed an Islamic school of Confucian thought and a Chinese Muslim intellectual Identity. In the process, Chinese Muslim intellectuals, including the scholar Liu Zhi, made the case that the Prophet Muhammad was a Confucian sage and his teachings belonged in the Confucian canon. This thesis also explores the relationship between Chinese Muslims and the Qing state in an effort to explain why their teachings did not spread to the rest of Chinese society.

  • Thumbnail for Metabolism: Apocalypse, Rebirth and Identity in Post-war Japan
    Metabolism: Apocalypse, Rebirth and Identity in Post-war Japan by Weidner, Matthew Timothy

    An introduction to Metabolism, a Japanese architectural movement founded in the aftermath of World War II that allowed Japan to gain recognition internationally for the first time from western architectural firms. This thesis will state the tenants of Metabolism and investigate its presence in the modern world, as well as ascertain the level of its influence in Japanese Science Fiction.

  • Thumbnail for Asian Studies program : semester in Asia : Shanghai, China Spring 2014
    Asian Studies program : semester in Asia : Shanghai, China Spring 2014

    Poster created to inform Colorado College students about an opportunity to study in Shanghai, China during Spring semester, 2014.

  • Thumbnail for Natural history museum visitors' understanding of human evolution
    Natural history museum visitors' understanding of human evolution by Smith, Shaye

    Recent polls indicate that only 15% of Americans accept secular evolution as the cause of human origins and less than 10% possess a functional understanding of evolutionary concepts (Gregory 2009; Newport 2012). Due to various social and psychological barriers to the acceptance and understanding of evolutionary theory as well as a minimal educational focus on evolution, for some Americans visiting institutions of informal education like natural history museums is their only opportunity to obtain scientifically sound information about evolution (Diamond and Evans 2007; Spiegel et al. 2006). Many studies have investigated natural history museum visitors’ understanding of evolution but few have examined understanding of human evolution in particular. Data were collected over a five-day period at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC. Ninety-six museum visitors participated in an exit survey in the Hall of Human Origins. Fifty percent of visitors subscribed to young earth creationist or theistic evolutionary beliefs. Visitors’ answers to questions pertaining to information presented in the exhibition and their understanding of the principles of evolution as the basis of human origins were scored for accuracy. Relationships were found between acceptance and understanding, with those who accepted secular evolution scoring on average 79%, those who accepted theistic evolution scoring on average 70%, and those who accepted young earth creationism scoring on average 41%. Results indicate that visitors held several misconceptions about evolution, e.g. new traits that arise in populations are always beneficial (54%) and adaptations arise in response to need or an intentional effort to change by individuals (68%). Because natural history museums house the objective scientific knowledge and fundamental evidence for evolution, they play an important role in educating the public. However, as these results indicate, personal beliefs influence visitors’ ability to understand the principles of evolution as the basis of human origins.

  • Thumbnail for El agua es la vida y la vida no se vende : The Cochiti Pueblo and the cultural impact of the Cochiti Dam : water, landscape and spiritual connection
    El agua es la vida y la vida no se vende : The Cochiti Pueblo and the cultural impact of the Cochiti Dam : water, landscape and spiritual connection by Acquisto, Kalen Jesse

    The people of the desert Southwest have significantly felt the global water crisis. This paper explores the constant struggle for water rights by focusing on the Cochiti Pueblo in New Mexico, a community which plays a central role in understanding the issue of water shortage and disputes over water claims in the Southwest. The building of dams, a primary solution to the water crisis, also creates environmental and social impacts on the local cultures. This ethnographic study explores to what degree land conversion, as a result of dam building, has affected the Cochiti people’s native agricultural lands and practices. This paper incorporates perspectives of multiple stakeholders, including local farmers and ranchers, lawyers, forest rangers and members of the Cochiti community. The multiplicity of voices reveal the complexity of water sharing, as every party involved upholds different values and often one profits at the expense of others. The struggles of the Cochiti illustrate the difficulty in finding balance between environmental sensitivity, corporate interests and traditional cultural practices. Specifically, this project identifies the need for maintaining control of the water distribution, stabilizing the environmental issues resulting from the Cochiti Dam and preserving the cultural traditions of the Cochiti Pueblo. Exploring these issues on a local and global level is integral for the future of our environment and local cultures.

  • Thumbnail for The power of museums : identity and nationalism in Andalusia
    The power of museums : identity and nationalism in Andalusia by Tani, Krista Ann Sakae

    This thesis explores the roles that museums in Andalusia, Spain play in constructing and reflecting a sense of identity and nationalism. Andalusia is composed of imagined communities defined by their particular histories and cultural contexts, and museums are central in navigating the variability in the region’s collective memory. Museums emphasize certain aspects of the region’s history and culture and exclude others in the process of constructing narratives. By observing twenty-six museums in Andalusia, categorized as archaeology museums, history museums, ethnographic museums, and cultural interpretation centers, it is possible to identify elements central to defining the region and its inhabitants. Examining the way in which particular events and cultures are highlighted or silenced, and the way in which the past is constructed in relation to the present, reveals the power the museums hold in creating identities and perceptions of places and people.