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  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2013-02-04]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2013-02-04] by Walden, Jacob , Mia, Mohammad

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Executive Council meeting held on February 4, 2013. Members present include: Student Concerns Vice President Charis Whitnah, Outreach Vice President Pat Knecht, Finance Vice President Stanley Sigalov, and Constitutional Vice President Elliott Mamet.

  • Thumbnail for Do you love orgasms
    Do you love orgasms by Johnson, Savannah A.

    This poster was created for the event "I <3 (Female) Orgasm", held on April 24, 2013 at 7:00 p.m., in the Cornerstone Theater on the Colorado College Campus. The event included a presentation by guest speakers Marshall Miller and Kate Weinberg.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Full Council minutes [2013-03-07]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Full Council minutes [2013-03-07] by Mia, Mohammad

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Full Council meeting held on March 7, 2013.

  • Thumbnail for The purple paper : politics monthly [2012-2013 Block 7]
    The purple paper : politics monthly [2012-2013 Block 7]

    The Purple Paper : Politics Monthly is the newsletter of the CC Dems, CC Repubs and the Collaborative for Community Engagement.

  • Thumbnail for Harlem Shake at Tutt Library
    Harlem Shake at Tutt Library by Sigalov, Stanley

    There are many ways to beat the fourth week blues at Colorado College. This block we chose the Harlem Shake. Stanley Sigalov '13 took it upon himself to bring some joy to the Tutt Library and spread cheer. -- Catalyst Newspaper.

  • Thumbnail for The local aspects of marine resource management : a case study of two small-scale fisheries in Costa Rica
    The local aspects of marine resource management : a case study of two small-scale fisheries in Costa Rica by Gillett, Nicole Valerie

    The world’s fisheries provide humans with a significant source of protein and are the backbone of many coastal communities’ livelihoods. They are crucial for healthy marine ecosystems and biodiversity. Yet despite this they have been an ever worsening state for years. Marine resource management theories and techniques have attempted to address this crisis yet fish stocks continue to decline. One sector of the marine resource management, which is frequently underappreciated, are the small-scale fisheries which sustain millions of people worldwide and are negatively impacted by these decreasing trends. This study took place in two small-scale fishing communities along the Pacific Coast of Costa Rica. Both study sites are near marine conservation sites; however the one effort is a locally initiated Responsible Fishing Area and one is a government run Marine National Park. The studies focused on the perceptions of local fishermen and community members on the state of marine resources, conservation, and their role in resource management. Overall, correlations were found between increased community involvement in local marine management areas and more positive perceptions and investment, in the success of the area. These results add to past studies and new management theories which call for an increase in local participation and inclusion in management and marine conservation efforts in order to harness the support of these communities and address the needs of those people who depend on marine resources.

  • Thumbnail for Establishing community gardens for long-term success
    Establishing community gardens for long-term success by Yemma, Melanie

    Urban agriculture has had a strong presence in American cities throughout history, whether from concerns of food security or desires for green spaces. In the past two decades, gardens have made a large comeback due to grassroots and community desire to build community and partake in the local food movement. Common literature has agreed on the benefits that gardens can provide for cities, but no study has found what it specifically takes to establish gardens successfully, in order for their benefits to consistently show for the long-term. This study determines what factors are necessary to establish community gardens with longevity in mind. Through extensive analysis of existing literature, this study finds that the three largest factors for establishing and maintaining community gardens are community interest, support for resources, and organized structure. This study then examines how these factors are specifically at play in Colorado Springs, as the city’s budding interest in gardening makes for an exemplary case study. For Colorado Springs, this study finds that while community interest and mechanisms for resource support are present when it comes to establishing gardens, in terms of longevity, a lack of consistent structure for supporting and maintaining community gardens could hinder the longevity of community gardens. It is proposed that more organization and structure for the gardens, especially in regards to leadership development, can promote the success of these gardens, as well as other gardens nation-wide, for the future by making gardens more self-sustaining.

  • Thumbnail for The climatic effects of tree growth in Colorado : the influences of climate change on the Colorado Rockies’ treeline
    The climatic effects of tree growth in Colorado : the influences of climate change on the Colorado Rockies’ treeline by Naylor, Jacqueline Nicole

    Throughout the past century, there has been a global shift in climate. Temperatures have been rising, and while precipitation has been fluctuating, it has exhibited not obvious trends. This change in climate has led to global treeline advancement, and has presented ecological, economic, and social implications. Two of the most relevant implications, especially within the context of the western United States, are changing ecosystem dynamics and water yields. Therefore this study aims to explore the effects of climate change at treeline throughout the Colorado Rockies, with the objective to use simple meteorological data to explain and predict radial tree growth. Data was collected at ten individual mountains in five mountain ranges throughout the state. The subsequent dendrochronologies for each mountain were correlated with time, local and regional meteorology, and the other nine sites. The correlation between sites was compared to the distance between sites. Chronologies were also compared to regional wind and storm patterns. Ultimately, no significant climatic trends appeared to influence individual tree growth on a regional scale throughout the Colorado Rockies. In some sites, such as those bordering the western Colorado deserts, increasing precipitation led to increased radial growth. At a small number of sites in the Front Range and the Sawatch Range, increased summer and annual temperatures led to increased radial growth as well. The remaining sites showed no connection between radial tree growth and simple local and regional meteorological data. The dendrochronologies between most mountains were significantly correlated; the correlations ranged from 0.93 to 0.25, with most of the sites correlated at 0.6 and above. Surprisingly, the correlation coefficients between sites did not respond to the distance between mountains in a statistically significant way. Based on an analysis between site correlations, three groups emerged with inter-site correlation at 0.7 and above: west of the Continental Divide, Front Range and Central Rockies, and along the Continental Divide. In general, these groups showed a southwest to northeast orientation. Storm patterns that flow from the southwest to the northeast throughout the state act as the central variable in correlating chronologies between sites. Conclusively this study does not support the hypotheses that claim climate significantly affects radial growth, but instead provides important information that can be used to further understand the implications of climate on treeline dynamics in the Colorado Rockies.

  • Thumbnail for Martha Gellhorn and Maria Teresa Leon : exilic intellectuals with different political messages because of what they leave behind
    Martha Gellhorn and Maria Teresa Leon : exilic intellectuals with different political messages because of what they leave behind by Hutcherson, Sarah

    Martha Gellhorn (1908-1998), an American writer and journalist, and María Teresa León (1903-1988), a Spanish writer and activist, happen to be two women writing during the Spanish Civil War. They also happen to be in relationships with the renowned authors: Ernest Hemingway and Rafael Alberti. However, the reason for comparison is not founded in their gender nor their relationships with their famous literary husbands. The point of comparison that is intriguing lies in the fact that they are both intellectuals in metaphorical exile who bring double perspective to their writing, according to the theories of Edward Said, a Palestinian-American theorist. Through analyzing how León and Gellhorn bring their double perspectives to their writings, the paper will show how because their metaphorical exiles are different, the way in which they deliver their political messages in their writings varies.

  • Thumbnail for The Heart of pic : an intermedial translation of Le cœur de pic by Lise Deharme and Claude Cahun
    The Heart of pic : an intermedial translation of Le cœur de pic by Lise Deharme and Claude Cahun by Tinnell, Anna Teddy

    Le Cœur de Pic, a collection of thirty-two French Surrealist children's poems accompanied by twenty illustrations by Claude Cahun, is an irreplaceable artifact of Surrealist object experimentation in the late 1930's. Together, its phonetic- and optical-objects form the unique and specific "cross-border" function of the surreal book-object, which creates a hybrid and open-ended narrative. My goal in translating this text is to make a new textual object that is functionally equivalent to the surreal book-object of the 1930's, so that contemporary readers may access the mischievious and melancholic narrative contained therein. I have employed intermedial translation to create The Heart of Pic because Le Cœur de Pic is a multimodal text, having as much to do with verbal as it does visual elements. Intermedial translation is a new conversation in the field of translation studies in contemporary comparative literature. My hope is that this project will spark contribute to that conversation as well as the revolution of translation as we now know it.

  • Thumbnail for Understanding Ignatius : the formative years of the first Jesuit
    Understanding Ignatius : the formative years of the first Jesuit by Patterson, Joseph

    An exploration of the early years of Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuit Order, highlighting some key unique characteristics of his transformation via spiritual conversion in the sixteenth century.

  • Thumbnail for On the threshold : the liminality of Asian Americaness in American cinema
    On the threshold : the liminality of Asian Americaness in American cinema by Kanemori, Taylor Marie

    An analysis of Asian roles in American cinema revealed a complex portrayal of Asian Americans liminality. Seventeen films derived from “Asian American Film 101” (2011) a list created by Michael Kang were used to conduct this research. The literature concluded there were limited spaces for Asians in Hollywood: women shown as hypersexual and men a meek and asexual. Using content analysis from these seventeen significant Asian American Oscar nominated films, the research showed the presentation of Asian Americaness in a state of transition. These films showed the Western perception of a liminal state between their Asianess and their Americaness.

  • Thumbnail for The creation of self through the culture of emotions : identity development at two liberal arts colleges
    The creation of self through the culture of emotions : identity development at two liberal arts colleges by Schneider, Lauren

    Sociologists are starting to understand emotions as a socially constructed phenomenon. Research has been conducted to understand how emotions prevail in every environment, whether it is academic, person, or work settings. However, there is a lack of information gathered regarding emotions during critical transition periods. Based on previous theoretical findings about emotions, there are particular ways students should emote throughout their college experience. This study looks at the display of emotions at two liberal arts colleges. Through survey and focus group research, this thesis found that the colleges were much the same, and the expected differences in gender were not found. The major difference was between the expression and suppression of emotion between freshmen, sophomores, and upperclassmen.

  • Thumbnail for An examination of the American corrections system : analyzing the impact of programs and privatization on corrections spending and inmate rehabilitation
    An examination of the American corrections system : analyzing the impact of programs and privatization on corrections spending and inmate rehabilitation by Tams, Zachary Borden

    For decades the American corrections system has failed to provide adequate, much less successful rehabilitation to prison inmates. Paired with other factors contributing to crime, America has the unfortunate distinction of owning the world’s highest incarceration rate. Some prisons offer rehabilitation programs, many of which are very successful, but in an environment of fiscal austerity, they are often the first to be eliminated. Correctional industries are becoming more common in prisons due to their unique ability to be completely self-sufficient in requiring no government funding, as well as to provide meaningful rehabilitation that has a proven record of success. Private prisons have arisen as an alternative to relieve overcrowded public prisons. Some facilities are well managed and provide useful programs. Many private facilities, however, are purely profit-driven, and unless these facilities are held accountable to standards of financial transparency as well as meaningful rehabilitation, their numbers could grow malignantly and become nothing more than warehouses of captive labor for unscrupulous business ventures.

  • Thumbnail for A novel mutation in the daf-19 gene affects ciliated neuron development in C. elegans
    A novel mutation in the daf-19 gene affects ciliated neuron development in C. elegans by Wells, Kristen Lynn

    The Caenorhabditis elegans male and hermaphrodite nervous systems display sexually dimorphic development characterized, in part, by the presence of 8 hermaphrodite-specific neurons and 89 male-specific neurons. We are interested in identifying the genes and molecular mechanisms that govern sex-specific neural development in C. elegans. Through a mutagenesis screen using a pkd-2::GFP reporter to label male-specific neurons, we recovered several mutants that display defects in sex-specific neural development. Males carrying the sm129 mutation lack pkd-2::GFP expression in the male-specific CEM neurons that are involved in mate finding. Genetic epistasis experiments suggest that CEM neurons are improperly specified or differentiated. We cloned the sm129 mutation and determined that it is an allele daf-19 based on three pieces of evidence: (1) RNAi of daf-19 phenocopies sm129, (2) sm129 fails to complement a daf-19 null mutation, and (3) we found a mutation in daf-19 that likely affects splicing. We are also testing to see if sm129 mutants can be rescued by adding a wild type copy of daf-19. daf-19 encodes an RFX transcription factor that activates genes required for sensory cilia function in ciliated neurons such as the CEMs. daf-19 null mutants lack all sensory cilia, have sensory defects, and display a constitutive dauer phenotype (worms enter an alternative part of the lifecycle associated with starvation survival). We are currently investigating how this mutation affects ciliated neurons such as CEMs but does not affect dauer formation.

  • Thumbnail for A failure to atone : object relations theory in Orestes’ sacrifice of sanity
    A failure to atone : object relations theory in Orestes’ sacrifice of sanity by Mitsunaga-Whitten, Michiko Audrey

    As he feels the inescapable brunt of duty bound with crime, Orestes, son 0f Agamemnon and Clytemnestra, declares: If the serpent came from the same place as I, and slept in the bands that swaddled, me, and its jaws spread wide for the breast that nursed me into life and clots stained the milk, mother’s milk, and she cried in fear and agony- so be it. Aesch. Ag. 1 Spurred by Apollo, Electra, responsibility, and omens, Orestes is coerced to commit revengeful matricide. What seems an ancient family feud in The Oresteia is a timeless and modern issue, that yields itself to fruitful analysis when seen through the lens of infantile developmental stages in Melanie Klein’s object relations theory. Klein herself reflected upon The Oresteia and its correspondence to object relations in her book, Envy and Gratitude (1984). As if Aeschylus held a modern understanding of the depth and development of the unconscious, his characters are paradigmatic of the object relationships Klein describes. The cardinal conclusion Klein arrives at in her psychoanalytic criticism of Aeschylus’ trilogy is that Orestes’ acquittal in the third book, The Eumenides, heals and restores his mental state after intense familial trauma. I, on the other hand, propose that there is an essential feature of Orestes’ trial that forbids a healthy psychic recovery to occur for the unfortunate prince.

  • Thumbnail for A narratological insight on the journey to an integrated self :  individuation and collective merging in Homer’s Odyssey and James Joyce’s Ulysses
  • Thumbnail for Child and play : is decreased playtime affecting the classroom? A study of the importance of recess and playtime for children
  • Thumbnail for Speaking with space : fusions of east and west in Isamu Noguchi's UNESCO garden
    Speaking with space : fusions of east and west in Isamu Noguchi's UNESCO garden by Cabot, Heather

    In 1958, the Japanese-American sculptor Isamu Noguchi (1904-1988) brought to completion his first large-scale garden project: the Garden of Peace, both Japanese and modernist in style, for the new UNESCO headquarters in Paris, France. The commission, begun in 1955 and originally intended for his design of the new facilities’ outdoor patio space, was extended by Noguchi to include a Japanese-style garden adjacent to, but lower than, the original site. With Isamu Noguchi’s formal Western training and interest in Japanese culture, the final product is an unusual hybrid; its materials, forms, composition, and spirit are a synthesis of both Eastern and Western aesthetic values. His writings and documented interviews are plentiful and offer us a unique glimpse into the artist’s own meditations and conclusions. This thesis will draw on Isamu Noguchi’s own writings in an attempt to resolve what may appear to be mixed messages in the form of the work. The motivations of the planning group at UNESCO, the commissioning institution for Noguchi’s Paris garden, will also be considered.

  • Thumbnail for Metabolism: Apocalypse, Rebirth and Identity in Post-war Japan
    Metabolism: Apocalypse, Rebirth and Identity in Post-war Japan by Weidner, Matthew Timothy

    An introduction to Metabolism, a Japanese architectural movement founded in the aftermath of World War II that allowed Japan to gain recognition internationally for the first time from western architectural firms. This thesis will state the tenants of Metabolism and investigate its presence in the modern world, as well as ascertain the level of its influence in Japanese Science Fiction.

  • Thumbnail for Natural history museum visitors' understanding of human evolution
    Natural history museum visitors' understanding of human evolution by Smith, Shaye

    Recent polls indicate that only 15% of Americans accept secular evolution as the cause of human origins and less than 10% possess a functional understanding of evolutionary concepts (Gregory 2009; Newport 2012). Due to various social and psychological barriers to the acceptance and understanding of evolutionary theory as well as a minimal educational focus on evolution, for some Americans visiting institutions of informal education like natural history museums is their only opportunity to obtain scientifically sound information about evolution (Diamond and Evans 2007; Spiegel et al. 2006). Many studies have investigated natural history museum visitors’ understanding of evolution but few have examined understanding of human evolution in particular. Data were collected over a five-day period at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC. Ninety-six museum visitors participated in an exit survey in the Hall of Human Origins. Fifty percent of visitors subscribed to young earth creationist or theistic evolutionary beliefs. Visitors’ answers to questions pertaining to information presented in the exhibition and their understanding of the principles of evolution as the basis of human origins were scored for accuracy. Relationships were found between acceptance and understanding, with those who accepted secular evolution scoring on average 79%, those who accepted theistic evolution scoring on average 70%, and those who accepted young earth creationism scoring on average 41%. Results indicate that visitors held several misconceptions about evolution, e.g. new traits that arise in populations are always beneficial (54%) and adaptations arise in response to need or an intentional effort to change by individuals (68%). Because natural history museums house the objective scientific knowledge and fundamental evidence for evolution, they play an important role in educating the public. However, as these results indicate, personal beliefs influence visitors’ ability to understand the principles of evolution as the basis of human origins.

  • Thumbnail for Determinants of FDI from traditional versus nontraditional source countries
    Determinants of FDI from traditional versus nontraditional source countries by Price, Christin

    Inflows of foreign direct investment spur growth in the receiving country and cause positive spillovers of technology and skill throughout the entire economy. FDI comes from source countries that can be broadly classified as traditional and nontraditional investors. Traditional refers to wealthy and developed economies, while nontraditional refers to emerging economies in the process of developing. The overarching hypothesis is that nontraditional source countries are less risk-averse than their wealthier counterparts. This is believed to be the case because multinational enterprises located in these regions are familiar with political and economic uncertainties at home; therefore, less than satisfactory investment conditions in the host economy abroad do not deter their interest. If FDI is originating in a more diverse set of source countries, does this mean receiving nations have more opportunities to attract FDI and subsequently experience positive growth? We test how the two source country types respond to different elements of risk using a random effects generalized least squares regression. Our main empirical findings support that political instability indeed does not deter FDI flows originating in nontraditional source countries, however quality of transport and trade-related infrastructure within the receiving economy does determine FDI flows from both source country types. Overall, we strongly emphasize that a blanket generalization concerning investment behavior between different types of source countries cannot be made, and encourage more research to be done in this relatively new field of study.

  • Thumbnail for The price of health : a cross national analysis of medical expenditures
    The price of health : a cross national analysis of medical expenditures by Sigalov, Vyacheslav

    Health research has been rapidly growing within the realm of development economics. A recent and important question is whether national health expenditures significantly influence the health outcomes of a nation. While health budgets increase by millions of dollars every year, there is no consensus on whether these increases have a positive effect on overall medical care. Using macro-economic data from 155 developed, transition, and developing nations, I provide econometric evidence towards this question. Furthermore, I attempt to show variable returns to scale by separating the country set into four human development levels. The results show a significant and positive relationship between health expenditures and health outcomes, but fail to show a trend in returns to scale.

  • Thumbnail for The impact of natural disasters on divorce rate : housing destruction as a channel
    The impact of natural disasters on divorce rate : housing destruction as a channel by Iwasaki, Yukiko

    With the increasing frequency, natural disasters are affecting more and more people these days. We investigate the relationship between natural disasters and divorce rate in the United States, specifically through the channel of housing destruction. We used panel data of 50 states for the years 2000 to 2009 from multiple sources. Becker’s marriage model suggests that destruction of houses through natural disasters is a great shock to a marital-specific capital and may be a trigger for a divorce. OLS regression with fixed effect reports a positive and significant relationship between divorce rate and per capita property damage through natural disasters, as hypothesized. The result was robust after the white’s correction and instrumenting medium income and home price.

  • Thumbnail for The economics of delisting: the case of European football
    The economics of delisting: the case of European football by Burbano, Santiago Alejandro

    Professional football teams that once chose to list their stock in the exchange markets have started to delist in the last few years. This study presents a modified version of Altman’s 1968 bankruptcy model and applies multivariate discriminant analysis to predict which financial and socioeconomic factors affect a team’s decision to delist from a stock market. Our non-metric dependent variable is listed/delisted teams, while our independent variables include a number of Altman’s financial ratios, GDP per capita, winning percentage, and two measures specific to soccer franchises–broadcasting and sponsorship revenues. Data are obtained for a total of 37 European teams, out of which 21 remained listed, while 16 were delisted at the time this study was written. Results suggest that the two main variables affecting a delisting decision are broadcasting revenues and working capital. Wealthier football teams that remain listed could benefit from our results by focusing on maintaining a positive working capital, while for smaller teams it might be wise to find alternative revenue sources other than TV revenues.