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Browsing 373 results for facet Publication Year with value of 2012.
  • Thumbnail for The Asclepian [2012 v. 1 issue 2]
    The Asclepian [2012 v. 1 issue 2]

    Compiled by Colorado College Students for Global Health. The Asclepian is an independent publication of the Students for Global Health Club. The newsletter was started in order to educate the student body about current issues affecting public and global health.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-09-11]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-09-11] by Mamet, Elliott

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Executive Council meeting held on September 11, 2012. Members present include: President Nathan Lee, Student Concerns Vice President Charis Whitnah, Outreach Vice President Pat Knecht, Finance Vice President Stanley Sigalov, Constitutional Vice President Elliott Mamet and Faculty Advisor Professor Peter Blasenheim.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-10-12]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-10-12] by Walden, Jacob , Mia, Mohammad

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Executive Council meeting held on October 12, 2012. Members present include: President Nathan Lee, Student Concerns Vice President Charis Whitnah, Outreach Vice President Pat Knecht, Constitutional Vice President Elliott Mamet, and Associate Dean of Students Rochelle Mason.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado Springs panhandling ordinance
    Colorado Springs panhandling ordinance by Sigalov, Stanley , Whitnah, Charis , Lee, Nathan , Mamet, Elliott , Knecht, Pat

    This is a letter from the members of the Colorado College Student Government Association addressed to Colorado Springs City Council President Scott Hente and President Pro Tem Jan Martin. The Colorado College Student Government Association submitted a student opinion regarding a proposed city panhandling ordinance.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Full Council minutes [2012-10-18]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Full Council minutes [2012-10-18] by Mia, Mohammad

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Full Council meeting held on October 18, 2012.

  • Thumbnail for An analysis of alternatives for water distribution between municipal and agricultural users of Colorado River water
    An analysis of alternatives for water distribution between municipal and agricultural users of Colorado River water by Hardin, Sally

    The Colorado River is often referred to as the “lifeblood” of the American Southwest, as it sustains rapidly growing cities, feeds millions of agricultural acres, and forms some of the world’s most incredible natural features. The Colorado River is also one of the most highly dammed, diverted, and otherwise regulated rivers in the world. In the last few decades, the demands on the flows of this river have begun to exceed its supply, which is threatened not merely by over-allocation but also by drought and climatic uncertainties. The river’s dwindling supplies are no longer enough to support the Southwest’s rapid population growth in municipal areas while simultaneously answering to the demands of the more senior water rights holders, the agriculturalists. This thesis is an exploration of the current contentions between agricultural and municipal users of Colorado River water, with a focus on the alternatives available to address these ongoing issues. Of many options, including increased infrastructure and various conservation measures, water banking has been identified as the strategy most socially, economically, and environmentally qualified to address these pervasive imbalances in water supply and demand of the Colorado River.

  • Thumbnail for The History and Future Prospects of Colorado Conservation Easements
    The History and Future Prospects of Colorado Conservation Easements by Stewart, Allison A

    Understanding the history, purpose, requirements and benefits of conservation easements provides the necessary background for a grasp of what land trust organizations are currently doing, and can do, to ensure that perpetuity of conservation is upheld. An explanation of the dynamic reality and of the challenges of conservation easements that are posed by global climate change is emphasized. The intent is to comprehensively develop the concept of conservation easement, to illuminate the inherent benefits and challenges of permanent land conservation, and then identify a series of suggestions. Recognizing the ways in which conservation easements can be strengthened, mostly by changing the language, is a noble step toward improving the environment and hopefully will contribute to a stronger, healthier, and more sustainable environment for the future.

  • Thumbnail for The monthly rag [2011-2012 Block 8]
    The monthly rag [2011-2012 Block 8] by Colorado College. Dept. of Feminist and Gender Studies

    The Monthly Rag, a publication of the Feminist and Gender Studies interns, is found affixed to toilet stall walls around the Colorado College campus.

  • Thumbnail for The monthly rag [2011-2012 Block 6]
    The monthly rag [2011-2012 Block 6] by Colorado College. Dept. of Feminist and Gender Studies

    The Monthly Rag, a publication of the Feminist and Gender Studies interns, is found affixed to toilet stall walls around the Colorado College campus.

  • Thumbnail for The monthly rag [2012-2013 Block 4]
    The monthly rag [2012-2013 Block 4] by Colorado College. Dept. of Feminist and Gender Studies

    The Monthly Rag, a publication of the Feminist and Gender Studies interns, is found affixed to toilet stall walls around the Colorado College campus. Issue incorrectly identified as Block IX.

  • Thumbnail for Shit boys say
    Shit boys say

    A video created by Colorado College students as part of the course, FG110 Introduction to Feminist and Gender Studies, taught by Assistant Professor Heidi Lewis during Block 5, 2012.

  • Thumbnail for Is Lady Gaga a feminist?
    Is Lady Gaga a feminist?

    A video created by Colorado College students as part of the course, FG110 Introduction to Feminist and Gender Studies, taught by Assistant Professor Heidi Lewis during Block 5, 2012.

  • Thumbnail for What was the turning point of World War II?
    What was the turning point of World War II? by Moore, Jeffrey Andrew

    This paper focuses on what the turning point of World War II was from several different points of view. One is the Battle of Stalingrad, and the other is Hitler's military leadership throughout the war.

  • Thumbnail for Border life
    Border life by Goodman, Sophie Anne

    My stories can be described as “slice of life” stories. In other words, a confined, very specific setting begets a character and defines their unique experience. The defined borders of the environment allow the setting to come alive as much as the characters: the pressures of prep school life motivate three friends to push boundaries with dire consequences; Brooklyn through the eyes of an orthodox Jewish girl becomes a vehicle to highlight specific cultural values and to highlight a foreign land contained in the very familiar; a cartoon artist’s daily route through the streets of Providence catalyzes character transformation when that daily routine is interrupted by Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong; feeling out of place in a city so different from home can result in an affliction of the mind attributed to intense nostalgia and loneliness; and finally, the city of New York becomes as much a part of the narrative as the boys’ journey and coming of age. I credit Henry David Thoreau as my inspiration for the following exploration and the title piece of this collection. Through his experiment in living, Thoreau arrived a place where he found the profound in the very minute: he describes connecting on an intimate level with pine needles, seeing Greek battles in the way that ants marched to and from home, and the connection between Walden Pond and the sky, “sky water”, in a moment of transcendence on a sunny afternoon. The meat of a story and of a character is in the details. For example, the answer to the question of why a certain character chose to wear a particular pair of shoes could be the key to ultimately understanding them. The tradition of the midrash, stories collected in the Talmud from medieval rabbis that attempt to anecdotally explain scripture, also provided a model for the overall structure of many of the stories and the dialogue itself embedded in the stories. Midrashim are told in a manner similar to that of a Socratic dialogue where one rabbi poses a question and others answer with an opposing view. They argue back and forth, in often humorous exchanges, until it results in an absolutely unexpected, yet satisfactory, philosophical conclusion. This structure explores not only the extremes of the larger issue at stake in a story but also highlights the reality of dealing with the person on the other side of the table who may have wildly different life experiences and opinions than you. My goal was ultimately, through my own artistic lens, to capture something human and relatable in each of these stories. I hope that the reader finds that something comes alive for them as well, either in the characters, the plot, or the environments.

  • Thumbnail for Media regulated lives : a comparative study on the effects of media regulation on Australian and American college students
    Media regulated lives : a comparative study on the effects of media regulation on Australian and American college students by Reissmann, Judith Nonhlanhla

    This thesis explores the relationship between media regulation and social status by conducting comparative study between Australian and American college students. The thesis defines popular culture as a new form of high culture used to elevate social status. The hypothesis states that less media regulation exposes people to more popular culture and therefore improves their social status. Australians live in a context of less media regulation and are therefore popular culture and media exposures are hypothesized to have less of an impact on their social statuses compared to Americans. In order to test this hypothesis, a survey was sent to Australian students at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, and to students at the Colorado College in the United States. The survey results and analysis revealed that though American students have higher levels of achievement and aspiration in college compared to Australian students, American students have significantly lower prestige scores. The results of the thesis as well as other alternative hypotheses ask questions and start a discussion for future comparative research on media regulation and society.

  • Thumbnail for The rise of Phoolan Devi : from demon to divine incarnation
    The rise of Phoolan Devi : from demon to divine incarnation by Press, Elizabeth Ann

    Phoolan Devi (1963-2001) is recognized affectionately not only throughout her home state of Uttar Pradesh, but also throughout the entire country of India as the Bandit Queen. From a young age, Phoolan rejected her grim destiny as a submissive girl from a low caste and began speaking out for justice within her community. Though her early years were filled with abuse and rape, instead of her misfortune breaking her down, it only fueled her to stop injustice and reap revenge on such monsters. In her teens, as a dacoit, Phoolan’s hunger for retribution was ever increasing. At this time, she made her name on the main stage of India as a mysterious female bandit leader. The press and the people of India were in disagreement about whom and what Phoolan embodied—demon or divine being. After serving an eleven-year jail sentence for her illegal deeds as a dacoit, Phoolan Devi began a successful political career culminating in her election as a Member of Indian Parliament. Her second elected term, however, was cut short by her assassination on July 25, 2001. Throughout her life, Phoolan maintained a calm composure, an overwhelming presence of shakti, and a rare form of feminine masculinity. All of these qualities are particularly reminiscent of the great warrior goddess, Durga. This paper explores how Phoolan was able to escape India’s judgment as a demon and instead become an image of divinity. Additionally, this paper hypothesizes that this divinity is due not only to Phoolan’s modern embodiment of the myths describing Durga as a protective warrior goddess, but also to her enactment of Durga’s masculine power.

  • Thumbnail for A path to liberation : the theology of Gustavo Gutiérrez
    A path to liberation : the theology of Gustavo Gutiérrez by Coyle, Ryan Gerut

    This paper follows the development of Gustavo Gutiérrez's theology of liberation. Including the socio-economic conditions of Gutiérrez's native Peru during the mid 1900s, his own biblical interpretations, and the influences of Karl Marx, this paper traces Gutiérrez's path towards the idea that Christian Socialism can indeed exist and thrive in the world.

  • Thumbnail for Thermal reaction norms of metabolic scope in Madagascar hissing cockroaches
    Thermal reaction norms of metabolic scope in Madagascar hissing cockroaches by Wise, Kelsey Lane

    The “hotter is better” hypothesis states that the rate-depressing effects of low temperature cannot be compensated by acclimation or adaptation. In the present study we test this hypothesis by using metabolic rate and aerobic scope as performance indicators. Madagascar hissing cockroaches (Gromphadorhina portentosa) were acclimated to different temperatures for several weeks. After this acclimation period resting and maximal metabolic rates (RMR and MMR respectively) were measured via flow-through respirometry at temperatures ranging beyond the acclimation temperatures. RMR was obtained from animals kept in a dark chamber, at a given temperature, for at least 40 min. Following 1 min of vigorous shaking, MMR was calculated by using the highest continuous 30-sec running average of metabolic rate. Aerobic scope was determined as the difference between MMR and RMR. Preliminary results indicate that while the thermal reaction norms for RMR of cold acclimated animals are left-shifted compared to those of warm acclimated ones, the reaction norms for MMR displayed a reverse pattern, resulting in the warm acclimated animals having a higher aerobic scope. If confirmed, these results would lend support to the hotter is better hypothesis but also raise questions concerning the perception of metabolic rates as performance traits.

  • Thumbnail for There and back again
  • Thumbnail for One size does not fit all : choice homework as differentiation in the mixed middle school classroom
    One size does not fit all : choice homework as differentiation in the mixed middle school classroom by Rodriguez, Sarah E.

    Choice homework was implemented in a middle school science classroom for the purpose of differentiation. Literature on the history, types, importance, and usefulness of differentiation were discussed. Student affect towards, and time spent on, choice homework was measured through surveys. Homework completion rate was compared with previous units. Assignment selections were analyzed for patterns. Students had a generally positive response to the implemented strategy. A sub-population of students had increased rates of homework completion during the implemented strategy.

  • Thumbnail for Graduate courses for educators [2012 summer session]
    Graduate courses for educators [2012 summer session] by Colorado College. Dept. of Education

    Listing of graduate courses and programs for educators offered during the 2012 Summer Session at Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Forming a national standard : Japanese language standardization and national identity
  • Thumbnail for Beyond “high-risk” : how patriarchal social structures in India influence entry into sex work
    Beyond “high-risk” : how patriarchal social structures in India influence entry into sex work by Lesem, Emily Lorna

    From its earliest stages, the rhetoric of India’s HIV/AIDS discourse has maintained an explicit focus on transmission through contact with high-risk groups (i.e. migrant workers, sex workers, homosexuals, and intravenous drug users). India's intense focus on high-risk groups, and primary focus on the commercial sex work industry in HIV/AIDS research and prevention strategies exhibits critical voids in the academic literature, scholarship, and discourse surrounding the subject. Over the course of this research study I spent several months interviewing sex workers in Pune, India to gain a better understanding of the circumstances and social factors that contribute to women's involvement and participation in sex work and the sex work industry. Using my interviews, experiences in the red light district, and academic research on India's HIV/AIDS discourse I have attempted to highlight the uncritical use of the term “high-risk” in the rhetoric of India's HIV/AIDS discourse and to bring attention to the underlying social factors that create, maintain, and perpetuate entry into the sex work industry in India. The central focus of this research study is to displace female sex workers as the “vectors”, in epidemiological terms, of HIV/AIDS (Kadiyala and Barnett 2004: 1888) and highlight India’s patriarchal social structures that result in gender inequality and economic vulnerability for women as the social forces that lead women to participate in the commercial sex work industry, and hence to participate in high-risk behaviors and a high-risk industry that is significant in the spread of HIV/AIDS in India.

  • Thumbnail for A culture of thrift: an investigation of the effects of cultural factors on household savings rates
    A culture of thrift: an investigation of the effects of cultural factors on household savings rates by Conway, Emily Linda

    Americans are increasingly financially fragile with massive credit card debt and a mounting inability to see themselves through times of financial hardship (i.e. the loss of a job or severe illness). Researchers find that one quarter of Americans could not come up with the savings or assets to cover a financial shock of $2,000 within 30 days. This lack of savings in the United States stands in stark contrast to the thrifty values espoused in a number of European and Asian countries, where saving is a stylish and popular practice. Traditional indicators of household savings rates (i.e. the real interest rate, public debt, and growth in GDP per capita) fail to capture all of the variation observed from country to country; and therefore, innovative approaches now incorporate various cultural factors. This paper seeks to build upon previous work, utilizing a unique three stage regression analysis to examine the question, to what extent do cultural differences influence the variation in household savings rates around the world? Ultimately, this research finds that nations that place a higher value on teaching children about thrift have higher household savings rates. However, it is important to note that this cultural value for thrift is a product of various historical, political, and economic forces. This suggests that one must reconsider a linear notion of causality between culture and economics and instead reflect upon the manner in which the two constantly interact with and influence one another.

  • Thumbnail for Black economic empowerment in South Africa
    Black economic empowerment in South Africa by Stewart, Tashnika Bianca

    Apartheid has had long-lasting effects on the economic conditions in South Africa. It has affected the ability of the previously discriminated groups, in this case people of color, to achieve any form of upward social mobility. The white population holds majority of the wealth in a country that is predominantly black. To address issues of inequality the South African government introduced Black Economic Empowerment, a program seeking to redress poverty, especially amongst the black community. Initially the program was geared towards business management and ownership amongst the black population but changed to include human resource development and employment equity. This study uses three ordinary least squares regression models to determine the impact of black economic empowerment on the wage gap but also education and the job opportunities as they all inter-relate. The result of this study reveals there has been no consistent change over time. The wage gap is still exceptionally high between blacks and whites, with blacks remaining in an inferior position. Using examples of similar programs in Malaysia, Sri Lanka and Nigeria, education is a common theme in affirmative action programs that is lacking in South Africa. Therefore in order to achieve greater success the program needs to place more emphasis on the role of education in economic advancement.