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  • Thumbnail for Morgan, Ginger
    Morgan, Ginger by Wallace, Andrew

    Virginia “Ginger” Morgan graduated from Colorado College in 1986. She received Masters in Theological Studies from Vanderbilt. She was Assistant Director of Admission at Colorado College from 1987-1990, Associate Chaplain (and Acting Chaplain) from 1990-2005, and Associate Dean of Students 2005-2012. She was interviewed for the LGBT Oral History project on May 17 2012.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-11-05]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-11-05] by Walden, Jacob , Mia, Mohammad

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Executive Council meeting held on November 5, 2012. Members present include: President Nathan Lee, Student Concerns Vice President Charis Whitnah, Outreach Vice President Pat Knecht, Finance Vice President Stanley Sigalov, Constitutional Vice President Elliott Mamet, and Associate Dean of Students Rochelle Mason.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-10-05]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-10-05] by Walden, Jacob

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Executive Council meeting held on October 5, 2012. Members present include: President Nathan Lee, Student Concerns Vice President Charis Whitnah, Outreach Vice President Pat Knecht, Finance Vice President Stanley Sigalov, and Constitutional Vice President Elliott Mamet.

  • Thumbnail for The purple paper : politics monthly [2012-2013 Block 4]
    The purple paper : politics monthly [2012-2013 Block 4]

    The Purple Paper : Politics Monthly is the newsletter of the CC Dems, CC Repubs and the Collaborative for Community Engagement.

  • Thumbnail for Assessing the impact of mining on dissolved trace metal concentrations in surface water of the central Peruvian Andes
    Assessing the impact of mining on dissolved trace metal concentrations in surface water of the central Peruvian Andes by Boyes, Daniel Field

    Mining activity in the central Andes poses a serious threat to human health due to the release of heavy metals in surface water. Long-term exposure to elevated levels of heavy metals, including lead, cadmium, copper, and arsenic, are known to have severe detrimental effects on human health. Mining exposes large quantities of metal bearing rock, which oxidize in the presence of oxygen and water, releasing heavy metal ions into surface water. Surface water contamination in Perú as a result of mining operations is of particular concern due to a lack of regulation of large-scale mines. In order to determine the impact of mining on surface water heavy metal concentrations, water samples were collected in nine streams throughout our three watersheds in the central Peruvian Andes. Results showed [Mn] and [As] exceeded the EPA maximum allowable limits at 55% and 14% of sites, respectively. The [Mn] was significantly higher in impacted streams than non-impacted streams. The [As] was elevated in some non-impacted streams and below the EPA maximum allowable drinking water levels in some mine-impacted streams. While Mn appeared to be impacted by mining effluent, As seemed to have a natural groundwater source. This study suggests Mn and As pose a serious threat to human health in the regions of study. The [Zn], [Cu], and [Pb] seldom exceeded the EPA maximum allowable drinking water limit (5%, 3% and 5% of sites, respectively). Dry season [Zn], [Cu], and [Pb] do not appear to pose a serious threat to human health in these regions. Further research is needed to understand seasonal variations in both dissolved and particulate trace metal concentrations. Implementing a community-based water quality monitoring program in study regions may also afford local residents more autonomy and local knowledge regarding the impact of mining on heavy metal concentrations in their surface water.

  • Thumbnail for Methods for distributing appropriate sustainable energy technology in developing nations : a comparative analysis
    Methods for distributing appropriate sustainable energy technology in developing nations : a comparative analysis by Weiss, Tim McDow

    This thesis seeks to determine the most effective means of distributing appropriate sustainable energy technology to individuals that have no access to energy services. There are approximately 1.4 billion people around the world that are ‘energy-impoverished.’ ASETs are small-scale clean energy technologies that fill the immediate energy needs of these individuals. There are, however, seven fundamental barriers limiting the dissemination of these technologies. These barriers result from the microeconomic and sociological conditions of these populations. This thesis analyzes 12 unique distribution models from companies, nonprofit organizations, and universities, and shows how each model performs relative to these barriers. Following this analysis, I propose the most effective means of distribution ASET to energy-impoverished populations. Title on PDF: Methods for distributing appropriate sustainable energy technologies in developing nations : a comparative analysis

  • Thumbnail for Carbon fluxes in the SiB3 model : evaluating the response of the terrestrial biosphere to significant drought
    Carbon fluxes in the SiB3 model : evaluating the response of the terrestrial biosphere to significant drought by Shiach, Ian Michael

    This study investigated the behavior of the terrestrial biosphere during times of significant drought, particularly in regard to carbon fluxes. The Simple Biosphere Model Version 3 (SiB3) was used to facilitate an investigation of ecosystem drought response. The Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) was evaluated from 1983 to 2006 in order to produce historical drought maps, which were used to facilitate a subjective analysis of drought behavior and to identify geographic point locations in the SiB3 model for further temporal study. Standardized maps were produced for modeled physiological variables (gross primary productivity, respiration, net ecosystem exchange, and soil water stress factor) over time in order to determine general regional drought response patterns. Physiological response variable data for particular spatial locations was then analyzed over time during drought years for anecdotal comparison with observational study data. While the SPI, which standardizes precipitation, was predicted to be an indicator of ecosystem drought response, this did not appear to be the case. The droughts modeled in the SiB3 model, which included the droughts in the United States Southwest and Australia in 2002 and in Europe in 2003, were found to respond heterogeneously in terms of carbon fluxes to similar droughts. The U.S. Southwest and Australia appeared to respond to drought in a manner consistent with anecdotal evidence with regard to perturbations in gross primary productivity (GPP), ecosystem respiration, and net ecosystem exchange (NEE), while Europe appeared to respond in a manner dissimilar to published descriptions of that drought. The behavior of the soil water stress factor in Australia and Europe seemed to be incorrect as well. Precipitation input data, derived from a reanalysis dataset from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), the treatment by the SiB3 model of the soil water stress factor, and the possible heterogeneous vegetative response to seasonality between regions were identified as potential causes of these disparities.

  • Thumbnail for THE ANTS GO MARCHING A Study of Formicidae Movement Between and Within Yucca Plants
    THE ANTS GO MARCHING A Study of Formicidae Movement Between and Within Yucca Plants by O'Brien, Rebecca

    Ants and aphids are involved in a mutualistic relationship whereby the aphids produce a sugary waste product which the ants then harvest as food. We were interested in exploring the dynamics of this relationship, and specifically how ant movement was influenced by the distribution of aphids and the distribution of members of their own species. For this study, we focused on the interactions between the two insects on the flowering racemes of yucca glauca in the Rocky Mountains region. Ant populations showed patterns of both single and double attractors, with the number of attractors likely driven by aphid number (we did not have sufficient data to confirm this statistically). Although aphids proved to be a factor in determining the number of attractors, they were not significant in determining the number of ants on a plant or the number of ants entering or exiting that plant. Playing a much larger role in determining arrivals and departures was the number of focal ants, with increased numbers of focal ants lead to increased numbers of arrivals and departures from the plant. The number of ants on the nearest neighbor also impacted ant movement, but it influenced only arrival rates and not departure rates. The degree to which neighboring plants showed similar dynamics varied greatly between plants, but there were certain plants which correlated to a particularly great degree with their neighbors. These plants tended to be those with the most aphids.

  • Thumbnail for Restructuring Intersectionality with disability : reconceptualizing cleft lip and palate
  • Thumbnail for The monthly rag [2011-2012 Block 5]
    The monthly rag [2011-2012 Block 5] by Colorado College. Dept. of Feminist and Gender Studies

    The Monthly Rag, a publication of the Feminist and Gender Studies interns, is found affixed to toilet stall walls around the Colorado College campus.

  • Thumbnail for Femzine [2011-2012 v. 1 no. 1 Spring]
    Femzine [2011-2012 v. 1 no. 1 Spring] by Goldman, Maddie , Allyn, Charlotte

    A magazine created by Colorado College students as part of the course, FG200 Introduction to Feminist Thought, taught by Assistant Professor Heidi Lewis during Block 8, 2012.

  • Thumbnail for Semi-bilingual children's literature : affirming or distorting Latina/o identities
  • Thumbnail for The Chilean Catholic Church under authoritarianism : a study in strategic unity as exemplified by Archbishop Silva
    The Chilean Catholic Church under authoritarianism : a study in strategic unity as exemplified by Archbishop Silva by Stocker, Bernadette

    Pinochet gained power in 1973 in a coup that followed a period of rapid democratization that had culminated in Salvador Allende’s socialist democracy. In response to society’s new focus on equality during this period, the Church developed a progressive social doctrine that sided with the oppressed masses who had gained power for the first time. When the military junta took power, the Church suddenly had to choose between its new democratic ideals and its historic Latin American strategy of siding with the group in power. Its indecision resulted in a painfully divided compromise between two clearly opposed sides of the Church hierarchy. The upper echelon of the hierarchy, by remaining generally cooperative with the military regime, ensured institutional survival. The lower echelon of the hierarchy, by opposing the regime, kept the Church relevant to the masses that would someday regain power. The disunity within the Chilean hierarchy allowed for new and necessary flexibility that ensured both the Church’s institutional and popular survival under authoritarian rule. However, it was the careful strategy of Archbishop Silva that maintained the necessary unity that allowed the Church to utilize its internal factionalization to survive both the aggression of the dictatorship and the needs of its congregation, and ultimately maintain a critical degree of unity.

  • Thumbnail for La muerte y el narcisismo: un estudio psicoanalítico de las obras de Jorge Luis Borges
  • Thumbnail for From teacher to student
    From teacher to student by Ferris, Melissa Terra

    The research and studies of a third grade classroom using Constructivism. The past two years have been spent facilitating students' learning through the use of inquiry in science, math, reading and writing. The various lessons I learned in the process focused on student learning. Student needs, such as think time and emotional safety, were of particular import. Over the course of my masters, I adapted and used tools such as concept maps and formative assessments to identify student knowledge and gaps in learning. By the end of my degree program I had acquired new insights on the use of tangible manipulatives and their importance in a grade three classroom and have supported other teachers in my building with better use of formative assessments and inquiry learning in science and math. There is an increasing demand on teachers' performance. Understanding how students learn is an integral piece to accomplishing our goals in teaching.

  • Thumbnail for Facebook identities : constructing virtual selves in an online world
    Facebook identities : constructing virtual selves in an online world by Rhodes, Erin

    Each day we make many decisions about how we want to look and act in order to maintain our identity and present ourselves to society in the best possible light. Some individuals rebel against social norms while others follow them to the extreme. Our notions of self are influenced by society and how we desire to be perceived by society. This study focuses on the presentation of self in digital media, specifically on the online social network Facebook. I analyze how individuals construct their Facebook identity and why they present themselves in particular ways. Since users’ identities are known both offline and online by their audience they are unlikely to present a false-self to their “friends.” By interviewing 11 volunteers, I found that participants in this study mainly displayed information about themselves through pictures. Further, participants presented a virtual self through either carefully set privacy settings, not allowing friends to see tagged photos and consciously presenting themselves with certain viewers in mind. Given this, users are omitting information about their real selves in order to appear as their hoped-for self that they can only obtain through their virtual self. By looking at how individuals present themselves on Facebook and their choices about how they do so, we may better understand the relationship between identity and social norms and the significance of self presentation in virtual space and social interaction.

  • Thumbnail for Communal response to 9/11 and the role of the organization
    Communal response to 9/11 and the role of the organization by Morell, Kelsey Jane

    Disasters, man made or natural, can impact a community in extreme ways, sometimes changing a people’s lives forever. The research done by sociologists of disaster mainly focus on the communal response to the disaster and how quickly the community can bounce back from the life altering event. There are many aspects to a successful community response to a disaster including: preparation, social capital, cooperation, coordination and organizations. This paper offers analysis on over 80 organizations and categorizes them into specific groups describing what the categories can tell about a community. Through a modified response model of Bardo (1977) the organizations are specified as manifest or emergent, describing the 9/11 communities’ extensive social capital and resource mobilization. The second category is determined by the most common organization groups found in the American Red Cross’s 9/11 Service Guide: A list of Programs That Receive September 11 Recovery Grants from the Liberty Disaster Relief Fund. These four major categories demonstrate what areas received the most support and attention in the years following 9/11.

  • Thumbnail for The invisible lesbian : the creation and maintenance of quiet queer space and the social power of lesbian bartenders
    The invisible lesbian : the creation and maintenance of quiet queer space and the social power of lesbian bartenders by Hallgren, Kathleen Case

    Despite extensive scholarship exploring relationships between space, gender, and sexuality, little attention has been given to lesbian/queer subjects in everyday heterosexual spaces such as bars. Furthermore, there is an absence of work addressing the bartender as a social actor. This research confronts those gaps by examining the social power of lesbian bartenders in straight bars to facilitate lesbian networks, and to cultivate and maintain “quiet queer spaces”—structurally heterosexual and socially heteronormative spaces that temporarily and covertly double as safe spaces for queer populations. By drawing on previous scholarship, and conducting a primary investigation through interviews and observations, I examine the creation and maintenance of quiet queer spaces in Colorado Springs bars to conclude that quiet queer spaces are both present and necessary in lesbian networks. I specifically examine the position of the lesbian bartender in straight bars as one of unique social power, essential in the creation and identification of quiet queer space.

  • Thumbnail for ZK858.4 causes embryonic lethality but does not directly impact MEX-3 localization in an RNAi induced knockdown of E3 ubiquitin ligases in Caenorhabditis elegans
    ZK858.4 causes embryonic lethality but does not directly impact MEX-3 localization in an RNAi induced knockdown of E3 ubiquitin ligases in Caenorhabditis elegans by Reichard, Kathryn L.

    The ubiquitin proteosome system (UPS) functions in the cell to mark specific proteins for degradation. E3 ubiquitin ligases act as recognition factors and increase the specificity of the UPS. MEX-3 is an RNA binding protein in Caenorhabditis elegans that inhibits the translation of PAL-1, a posterior specifying protein, and contributes to development of the anterior of the embryo. MEX-3 is present throughout the oocyte, 1-cell, and 2-cell embryo. However, MEX-3 is then depleted in the posterior after the second cell division, and PAL-1 is then expressed in the two posterior blastomeres of the 4-cell embryo. MEX-3 is rapidly depleted from the entire embryo after the 8-cell stage. This degradation is location and time specific, and thus hypothesized to be caused by the UPS. MEX-3 is hypothesized to be targeted for degradation by a specific E3 ubiquitin ligase, and knockout of this protein should result in increase in universal MEX-3 expression in the early embryo. This study sought to determine the MEX-3 specific E3 ubiquitin ligase(s). Putative E3 ubiquitin ligases expressed during early embryonic development were knocked out in C. elegans, and phenotypes were determined. Of the knocked-out ligase genes, only one, ZK858.4 caused embryonic lethality at both 15˚ and 24˚ C. However, fluorescence microcopy of GFP::MEX-3 demonstrated that ZK858.4 knockout did not appear to increase global MEX-3 concentrations. Determining which protein targets MEX-3 degradation will provide more insight into the molecular mechanisms of determining anterior/posterior patterning in C. elegans early embryonic development.

  • Thumbnail for Thermal reaction norms of metabolic scope in Madagascar hissing cockroaches
    Thermal reaction norms of metabolic scope in Madagascar hissing cockroaches by Wise, Kelsey Lane

    The “hotter is better” hypothesis states that the rate-depressing effects of low temperature cannot be compensated by acclimation or adaptation. In the present study we test this hypothesis by using metabolic rate and aerobic scope as performance indicators. Madagascar hissing cockroaches (Gromphadorhina portentosa) were acclimated to different temperatures for several weeks. After this acclimation period resting and maximal metabolic rates (RMR and MMR respectively) were measured via flow-through respirometry at temperatures ranging beyond the acclimation temperatures. RMR was obtained from animals kept in a dark chamber, at a given temperature, for at least 40 min. Following 1 min of vigorous shaking, MMR was calculated by using the highest continuous 30-sec running average of metabolic rate. Aerobic scope was determined as the difference between MMR and RMR. Preliminary results indicate that while the thermal reaction norms for RMR of cold acclimated animals are left-shifted compared to those of warm acclimated ones, the reaction norms for MMR displayed a reverse pattern, resulting in the warm acclimated animals having a higher aerobic scope. If confirmed, these results would lend support to the hotter is better hypothesis but also raise questions concerning the perception of metabolic rates as performance traits.

  • Thumbnail for Choice, engagement, and reflective practices in the music classroom : the realization of independent musicianship
    Choice, engagement, and reflective practices in the music classroom : the realization of independent musicianship by Weidmann, Lindsay

    If students are given the opportunity to explore their own musical interests using a variety of learning strategies, how will it affect their overall self-efficacy and engagement in their own musical development? This question is explored through a learning unit created for 8th grade general music classes where the students experienced varying levels of choice in their musical learning. Students wrote reflections before, after, and during the unit. These reflective journals were the main source of data collection. Pre-unit reflective surveys focused on musical interests, past learning experiences both in and out of school, current musical goals, and current learning preferences. The unit’s central activities were for students to learn three different songs using a variety of learning methods and then write evaluative and reflective responses after each song performance. Post-unit reflective surveys focused on any changes in students’ motivation, confidence, cognitive engagement (evaluation), and emotional engagement (‘feeling’ statements). All surveys and reflective journals included qualitative data and quantitative data. Results show if students are given the opportunity to learn what they want while utilizing learning methods they prefer, it will not only engage them emotionally and cognitively but will also contribute positively to their overall self-efficacy in the music classroom. Overwhelmingly, students claimed the unit increased their overall motivation and confidence in learning to play music and cited their own cognitive engagement and emotional engagement as their reasons why. Other questions, observations, and implications raised by the study are also discussed.

  • Thumbnail for Incorporating clickers into the high school English classroom to improve grammar application to writing
    Incorporating clickers into the high school English classroom to improve grammar application to writing by Darras, Brittni Louise

    It is important that students are able to apply grammar knowledge to writing. Traditionally, students have gained grammar knowledge by working out of workbooks, but the majority of students fail to apply the gained grammar knowledge to their writing. My research aims to close this gap. Hoping that students would be more engaged and willing to learn grammar through technology, I created grammar lessons that my sophomore class could interact with using Classroom Response System (also known as clickers). The six lessons addressed correct usage of the dash, colon, semi-colon, parallel structure, complete sentences, and active voice. Each lesson contained identification and application questions. Prior to and following the clicker lessons, I collected various forms of data to measure progress. Quantitative data includes a grammar pre-test and post-test. Qualitative data includes pre-writing and post-writing samples. I also administered an open-ended survey in which each student responded about the clicker lessons after the project was complete. My results show that minus a couple of exceptions, participating in the clicker lessons did result in an increase in grammar knowledge. Also, the majority of students were able to correctly apply this grammar knowledge in their post-writing sample. The findings from this study can be used to encourage other English educators to find ways to implement technology in their classrooms as well.

  • Thumbnail for Forming a national standard : Japanese language standardization and national identity
  • Thumbnail for Beyond “high-risk” : how patriarchal social structures in India influence entry into sex work
    Beyond “high-risk” : how patriarchal social structures in India influence entry into sex work by Lesem, Emily Lorna

    From its earliest stages, the rhetoric of India’s HIV/AIDS discourse has maintained an explicit focus on transmission through contact with high-risk groups (i.e. migrant workers, sex workers, homosexuals, and intravenous drug users). India's intense focus on high-risk groups, and primary focus on the commercial sex work industry in HIV/AIDS research and prevention strategies exhibits critical voids in the academic literature, scholarship, and discourse surrounding the subject. Over the course of this research study I spent several months interviewing sex workers in Pune, India to gain a better understanding of the circumstances and social factors that contribute to women's involvement and participation in sex work and the sex work industry. Using my interviews, experiences in the red light district, and academic research on India's HIV/AIDS discourse I have attempted to highlight the uncritical use of the term “high-risk” in the rhetoric of India's HIV/AIDS discourse and to bring attention to the underlying social factors that create, maintain, and perpetuate entry into the sex work industry in India. The central focus of this research study is to displace female sex workers as the “vectors”, in epidemiological terms, of HIV/AIDS (Kadiyala and Barnett 2004: 1888) and highlight India’s patriarchal social structures that result in gender inequality and economic vulnerability for women as the social forces that lead women to participate in the commercial sex work industry, and hence to participate in high-risk behaviors and a high-risk industry that is significant in the spread of HIV/AIDS in India.

  • Thumbnail for Fundamental attribution error in letters to shareholders from the commercial airline industry
    Fundamental attribution error in letters to shareholders from the commercial airline industry by Wolff, Michael Lee

    Previous studies of annual reports that have looked at attribution theory in letters to shareholders found that CEOs and corporations tend to internalize positive performance outcomes and blame negative performance results on external factors. A past study of the railroad industry compared two similar railroads and found that the successful company made noticeable changes to its attributions, whereas the company that did not declared bankruptcy. Past research relating success or failure to attributions has been confined to a small number of industries. This paper aims to expand attribution literature by studying the U.S. commercial airline industry, which is essential to everyday social and business interactions that affect many Americans. This thesis examines causal relationships, attributions, and other themes within shareholder letters to determine patterns that might reveal insights on success or failure. Employing content analysis, this paper found that the previously observed pattern of attributions held, that legacy carriers acknowledged the importance of low-cost structures and point-to-point route systems but could not effectively alter their business models, and that low-cost providers made partially inaccurate attributions but were not victims of dangerous attribution error.