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  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-11-05]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-11-05] by Mia, Mohammad , Walden, Jacob

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Executive Council meeting held on November 5, 2012. Members present include: President Nathan Lee, Student Concerns Vice President Charis Whitnah, Outreach Vice President Pat Knecht, Finance Vice President Stanley Sigalov, Constitutional Vice President Elliott Mamet, and Associate Dean of Students Rochelle Mason.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-12-04]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-12-04] by Mia, Mohammad , Walden, Jacob

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Executive Council meeting held on December 4, 2012. Members present include: President Nathan Lee, Student Concerns Vice President Charis Whitnah, Outreach Vice President Pat Knecht, Finance Vice President Stanley Sigalov, and Constitutional Vice President Elliott Mamet.

  • Thumbnail for Relict tallgrass prairie of the Upper Black Squirrel Creek drainage, El Paso County, Colorado : change since the 1940's
    Relict tallgrass prairie of the Upper Black Squirrel Creek drainage, El Paso County, Colorado : change since the 1940's by Tsocanos, Sebastian A. E.

    In the mid 1940s remnant tallgrass prairie near Colorado Springs was recognized in vegetation studies on the plains. Tallgrass prairie is unusual in the arid Great Plains, and is of significant conservation value, particularly given the past and present pressures of urban expansion, intense grazing, and water development. Our study examined the question of whether this community type still exists in the region, if the extent of the community type has changed since then, and whether the species composition has changed. We found that while true tallgrass prairie vegetation is no longer dominant at many of the sites used in the original studies, patches of true tallgrass prairie still occur in the area. The extent of tallgrass prairie in the vicinity has clearly declined over the past 70 years. The vegetation of remaining patches is composed of very similar species to those originally documented. We found that the dominant vegetation is still characteristic of true tallgrass prairie. Among the important grasses were prairie dropseed, indian grass, little bluestem), and big bluestem. Important widespread forbs indicative of true tallgrass prairie included american licorice (Glycyrrhiza lepidota), stiff goldenrod (Oligoneuron rigidum), white heath aster (Symphyotrichum ericoides), and purple prairie clover (Dalea purpurea) among many others. We determined that overall precipitation and temperature in the locality has not changed dramatically since the 1940’s. The alluvial aquifer across much of the area is evidently little changed, but hydrology on a site-by-site basis is poorly understood. While the continued existence of some true tallgrass prairie communities here is reassuring, their diminished extent is cause for concern, especially given increasing pressure from urban expansion, livestock grazing, invasive species, and water development. The uncertain status of future temperature and precipitation, as well as the maintenance of critical surface and subsurface hydrologic regimes is also of concern.

  • Thumbnail for Coccinellid predation on Aphis helianthi : diffusive instability and pattern formation in predator-prey systems
    Coccinellid predation on Aphis helianthi : diffusive instability and pattern formation in predator-prey systems by Kidney, Daniel

    Spatial context in predator-prey systems has proven to have important dynamical consequences. Instabilities and spatial pattern formation driven by diffusion (Turing pattern formation) have been extensively observed and theorized on, but empirical examples of Turing pattern formation in ecological systems are few. In this study we construct and analyze a reaction-diffusion equation model of the aphid species Aphis helianthi under predation by two species of ladybugs: Coccinella septempunctata and Hippodamia convergens. The structure and parametrization of the model is entirely field derived and in analysis of model output it is compared extensively to field observations. This system fits the well known framework for diffusive instability and pattern formation: an activator-inhibitor system in which the inhibitor (predator) diffuses substantially faster than the activator (prey). Theory predicts that under these conditions the inhibitor will fail to strike a normal equilibrium with the activator; rather diffusing away from activator outbreaks too quickly to contain them, subsequently over-inhibiting the surrounding lower densities of activator (undermatching). This usually results in a patchy, bimodal distribution of prey resulting from cubic density dependence driven by undermatching. Aphid population distribution in the field is clearly bimodal and patchy. We looked for several indications of diffusive instability in field data; bimodality, cubic density dependence, and undermatching were all found. The focus of this paper is on a mathematical model we developed from field data to gain insight into the workings of the system. I found the model matched field data very well and corroborated the hypothesized functioning of a diffusive instability. I explored the role of self attraction (aggregation) among ladybugs. Aggregation is not considered a hallmark of diffusive instability but in this case it created some preytaxis in ladybugs (allowing aphids to act as an activator). Preytaxis by aggregation is slow though, which allowed some aphid populations to avoid detection long enough to reach the high attractor of cubic density dependence. Finally I considered the nature of space in our system. Although our model is constructed in Euclidean space it demonstrates some features of a network. Network structured systems manifest Turing patterns primarily as bimodal distributions. They also facilitate understanding of ladybug behavior and may increase efficiency of computer model execution.

  • Thumbnail for Badass
    Badass by Weber, Alexander

    A photograph and video created by Colorado College student Alex Weber as part of the course, FG206 Critical Media Studies, taught by Assistant Professor Heidi Lewis during Block 2, 2012.

  • Thumbnail for Femzine [2011-2012 v. 1 no. 1 Spring]
    Femzine [2011-2012 v. 1 no. 1 Spring] by Allyn, Charlotte , Goldman, Maddie

    A magazine created by Colorado College students as part of the course, FG200 Introduction to Feminist Thought, taught by Assistant Professor Heidi Lewis during Block 8, 2012.

  • Thumbnail for Noodle juice
    Noodle juice by Parish, Nathan

    A photograph and video created by Colorado College student Nate Parish as part of the course, FG206 Critical Media Studies, taught by Assistant Professor Heidi Lewis during Block 2, 2012.

  • Thumbnail for Delectible
    Delectible by Settineri, Margeaux

    A photograph and video created by Colorado College student Margeaux Settineri as part of the course, FG206 Critical Media Studies, taught by Assistant Professor Heidi Lewis during Block 2, 2012.

  • Thumbnail for Is Lady Gaga a feminist?
    Is Lady Gaga a feminist?

    A video created by Colorado College students as part of the course, FG110 Introduction to Feminist and Gender Studies, taught by Assistant Professor Heidi Lewis during Block 5, 2012.

  • Thumbnail for Semi-bilingual children's literature : affirming or distorting Latina/o identities
  • Thumbnail for  Redefining historical consciousness in the age of the nation-state
    Redefining historical consciousness in the age of the nation-state by Epstein, Alexandra

    The rise of the nation-state since modernity is a phenomenon that has been studied by theorists across various fields. What is it about the past few centuries that have inspired men to place so much faith in their nation? My paper will seek to ground G.W.F. Hegel’s Philosophy of History as the philosophical work that legitimized the nation’s rise to power, through the construction of a national historical consciousness. Hegel was the first thinker who attempted to unite the subjective self with the objective, by making the objective realizable through a philosophic understanding of history. The nation-state, Hegel suggested, was the ‘end of history’, because through individual thought man found himself to be reflected in his nation. The questions I will ask in my paper are: does Hegel go far enough to ground his extraordinary claim, that we can internalize our historical destiny through reason? How did his claims about history influence his followers, for better or for worse? Have we really reached the ‘end of history’, or did Hegel mean something else by his famous phrase? Last, is it still likely for national history to reveal a shared consciousness in today’s multicultural world? With these questions, I hope to provide a new perspective regarding Hegel’s Philosophy of History, as well as give the discipline of history a new place in our modern world.

  • Thumbnail for El papel de la literatura infantil en encuadernar la cultura, el lenguaje y la historia
    El papel de la literatura infantil en encuadernar la cultura, el lenguaje y la historia by Thirkell, Deanna Marie

    La literatura infantil mexicana y estadounidense no sólo facilitan la alfabetización y comparten moralejas universales como la preservación de la naturaleza, la inconformidad a las normas estéticas e ideológicas de la cultura hegemónica y el papel de personas de las diferentes clases sociales, sino también contienen a nivel subyacente comentarios y críticas de la sociedad con el propósito de informar, educar e inspirar a los niños a realizar los cambios sociales para un futuro mejor.

  • Thumbnail for Translation : Fahrenheit 451
    Translation : Fahrenheit 451 by Burt, Nathanael Lujan

    A translation of Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. In a futuristic society in which books are banned and the government knows all, how can a seventeen-year-old girl change the way that Montag sees the world?

  • Thumbnail for Hunters and symbolic space : negotiating status and legitimacy in the field of power
    Hunters and symbolic space : negotiating status and legitimacy in the field of power by Wool, Sarah Margaret

    Hunting in the West has historically been a valorous and honorable form of exploit, and yet in the present day the activity is not as commonly practiced as it once was. For people who do hunt, however, the activity is still a popular means of facilitating social interaction and enhancing the experience of the outdoors, particularly for men. This research examines the men and women involved in the subculture of hunting as they negotiate discourses around the activity and develop responses and justification narratives accordingly. Hunters respond to social structures both outside and inside the hunting subculture, combining the objective and subjective to formulate legitimization and validation tactics within a Bourdieuian field of social space and symbolic power.

  • Thumbnail for Facebook identities : constructing virtual selves in an online world
    Facebook identities : constructing virtual selves in an online world by Rhodes, Erin

    Each day we make many decisions about how we want to look and act in order to maintain our identity and present ourselves to society in the best possible light. Some individuals rebel against social norms while others follow them to the extreme. Our notions of self are influenced by society and how we desire to be perceived by society. This study focuses on the presentation of self in digital media, specifically on the online social network Facebook. I analyze how individuals construct their Facebook identity and why they present themselves in particular ways. Since users’ identities are known both offline and online by their audience they are unlikely to present a false-self to their “friends.” By interviewing 11 volunteers, I found that participants in this study mainly displayed information about themselves through pictures. Further, participants presented a virtual self through either carefully set privacy settings, not allowing friends to see tagged photos and consciously presenting themselves with certain viewers in mind. Given this, users are omitting information about their real selves in order to appear as their hoped-for self that they can only obtain through their virtual self. By looking at how individuals present themselves on Facebook and their choices about how they do so, we may better understand the relationship between identity and social norms and the significance of self presentation in virtual space and social interaction.

  • Thumbnail for "I'm on the in": an integrative Bourdieuian analysis of gender negotiation among female marijuana users at Colorado College
    "I'm on the in": an integrative Bourdieuian analysis of gender negotiation among female marijuana users at Colorado College by Rogers, Katie

    Existing analyses of gender relations in youth marijuana subcultures have consistently shown these social fields to be economically, socially, and culturally male-dominated. Despite this disparity and the questions it raises about the gendered investments and negotiations of woman who tap into this subculture, scholars have yet to employ case-specific, qualitative methods to investigate the subjective experiences of female marijuana users. Building on contemporary feminist integrations of gender into Pierre Bourdieu’s theories of social reproduction, this thesis uses the hybrid concepts of gendered field, gendered capital, and gendered habitus to perceive a typology of female marijuana users at Colorado College from 17 purposively sampled interviews. I posit that of the four observable types – guest moochers, honorary den bros, token stoner chicks, and independent floaters – two exhibit distinct forms of gender reflexivity, a self-consciousness of gender investments, negotiations, and constraints as components of a socially constructed game rather than as biological imperatives. These two forms of gender reflexivity – which I call tactical resignation and emergent reflexivity – raise further questions about the capacity for inquiry and discourse to induce reflexivity and the experience of marginalized gender identities in other social fields.

  • Thumbnail for Consequential subjectivity : the role of choice in the realization of social solidarity
    Consequential subjectivity : the role of choice in the realization of social solidarity by Spiegel, Rebecca Simone

    The concept of choice is a disputed but nonetheless important feature of human life. In light of the radical expansion of choice in contemporary Western, consumer culture, it is now, more than ever, critical to examine how one’s decisions are informed both by their context and by their potential effects. I propose that if we aspire to move toward the great social solidarity that the classical social theorists call for, we must put into practice a new concept to orient ourselves within this space of choices: a morality in which each individual views his own consequential subjectivity as the part of himself that he has in common with all other humans across space and time. I show that theory that seeks to explain any social phenomenon must acknowledge causal agency and incorporate the moral agency of the individual, who has the capacity to make seemingly non-rational choices, based on what is deemed to be significant to him. Such an endeavor necessitates an investigation of the processes through which the external world comes to have specific meaning and value for each individual. By first using Bourdieu’s work to locate individual agency in the challenges of everyday life and then arranging a marriage between the idealistic moral social theory of Bauman and the more functional theory of social solidarity that Alexander provides, I craft my own theory about how to progress toward a functional social solidarity.

  • Thumbnail for Masculine mesclun : the management of vegetarian masculinities
    Masculine mesclun : the management of vegetarian masculinities by Lang, Brendan

    In this thesis, I studied differences in conceptions and practices related to food and gender between males, females, vegetarians, and meat-eaters, with the key focus surrounding Male Vegetarians. I conducted a correspondence analysis of food and gender conceptions and supplemented it with information from five interviews with Male Vegetarians. I collected data by surveying Colorado Springs vegetarians and meat eaters, then entered the data into Ucinet 6 matrices and analyzed the results. From an online vegetarian “meet up” group, I found male volunteers for supplemental interviews that enabled interesting relationships shown in the correspondence data to be discussed in detail to better understand Vegetarian Male opinions, beliefs, and actions. I found that Vegetarian Men, as deviants of consumptive practices and gender performance, are excluded from normal status-seeking and power-building practices. However, aligned with their greatly individualized identities as vegetarians, these men have developed individualized definitions and strategies for managing and redefining their masculinity.

  • Thumbnail for Constructing contraceptive choices : a regional study of Colorado examining the factors influencing women’s contraceptive decisions
    Constructing contraceptive choices : a regional study of Colorado examining the factors influencing women’s contraceptive decisions by Baynard, Charlotte Rothschild

    This study examines the factors that impact women’s contraceptive choices. Using both quantitative and qualitative research techniques, combing survey and interview data, I explore the narratives women tell about their experience using birth control. Family Planning clinics, where women receive information and care, provide a space that is both assessable and confidential. The way that women talk about their experience using birth control is socially influenced based on the dominant narratives of their reference groups. The political and social atmosphere often informs reference group norms, which are then internalized by the individual and expressed through their contraceptive care choices. Significant events that occur in the lives of women shape the ways in which women talk about and use contraceptives. Women often use medicalized accounts of their physical experience with birth control to help distance themselves from its connotations with sexual activity. A narrative of the shared reproductive experience with their reference group shapes the way in which women assume and understand their own experience with contraceptives.

  • Thumbnail for Making sense of drinking behaviors : meaning making and identity construction in Alcoholics Anonymous and on college campuses
    Making sense of drinking behaviors : meaning making and identity construction in Alcoholics Anonymous and on college campuses by Mayo, Ashley Michele Oliphant

    In this paper, I explore the process of meaning-making around alcohol consumption in two contexts: Alcoholics Anonymous meetings and a college campus. Drawing on ethnographic observation of AA meetings, interviews with AA members, and a survey of college students, I will discuss how context and interaction shape the process of alcohol-related identity construction. In Alcoholics Anonymous, members are provided with a clear, established path toward identity creation. On the college campus, however, students must give meaning to their behaviors without the aid of explicit standards or expectations.

  • Thumbnail for A path to liberation : the theology of Gustavo Gutiérrez
    A path to liberation : the theology of Gustavo Gutiérrez by Coyle, Ryan Gerut

    This paper follows the development of Gustavo Gutiérrez's theology of liberation. Including the socio-economic conditions of Gutiérrez's native Peru during the mid 1900s, his own biblical interpretations, and the influences of Karl Marx, this paper traces Gutiérrez's path towards the idea that Christian Socialism can indeed exist and thrive in the world.

  • Thumbnail for Choice, engagement, and reflective practices in the music classroom : the realization of independent musicianship
    Choice, engagement, and reflective practices in the music classroom : the realization of independent musicianship by Weidmann, Lindsay

    If students are given the opportunity to explore their own musical interests using a variety of learning strategies, how will it affect their overall self-efficacy and engagement in their own musical development? This question is explored through a learning unit created for 8th grade general music classes where the students experienced varying levels of choice in their musical learning. Students wrote reflections before, after, and during the unit. These reflective journals were the main source of data collection. Pre-unit reflective surveys focused on musical interests, past learning experiences both in and out of school, current musical goals, and current learning preferences. The unit’s central activities were for students to learn three different songs using a variety of learning methods and then write evaluative and reflective responses after each song performance. Post-unit reflective surveys focused on any changes in students’ motivation, confidence, cognitive engagement (evaluation), and emotional engagement (‘feeling’ statements). All surveys and reflective journals included qualitative data and quantitative data. Results show if students are given the opportunity to learn what they want while utilizing learning methods they prefer, it will not only engage them emotionally and cognitively but will also contribute positively to their overall self-efficacy in the music classroom. Overwhelmingly, students claimed the unit increased their overall motivation and confidence in learning to play music and cited their own cognitive engagement and emotional engagement as their reasons why. Other questions, observations, and implications raised by the study are also discussed.

  • Thumbnail for One size does not fit all : choice homework as differentiation in the mixed middle school classroom
    One size does not fit all : choice homework as differentiation in the mixed middle school classroom by Rodriguez, Sarah E.

    Choice homework was implemented in a middle school science classroom for the purpose of differentiation. Literature on the history, types, importance, and usefulness of differentiation were discussed. Student affect towards, and time spent on, choice homework was measured through surveys. Homework completion rate was compared with previous units. Assignment selections were analyzed for patterns. Students had a generally positive response to the implemented strategy. A sub-population of students had increased rates of homework completion during the implemented strategy.

  • Thumbnail for Class pets : enriching and engaging learning
    Class pets : enriching and engaging learning by Schultz, Lauren M.

    Although many people have fond memories of classroom pets in elementary school, few realize that there are tangible benefits to students beyond simply engaging them in school. Classrooms which use animals in a variety of ways have been studied, and the results have been fairly similar across disciplines and grade levels. Animals almost universally decrease stress, increase motivation, encourage positive social behaviors and teach important skills. Now, not only do teachers have fond memories to encourage them to bring animals into their classrooms, but a plethora of research about the potential benefits.

  • Thumbnail for Stuck in a rut with primary products : the impact of colonization on trade and growth patterns
    Stuck in a rut with primary products : the impact of colonization on trade and growth patterns by Nadar, Devin

    The pattern of stagnating growth and underdevelopment remains an all too common phenomenon for countries with a colonial past, regardless of efforts by developmental economists and international organizations. In order to increase our understanding of what factors lead to this pattern, this study investigates the link between colonization and growth by examining trade characteristics of prior colonies. Using data from the World Bank, the IMF and the OECD, this study utilizes simultaneous equation modeling to determine how trade patterns can provide the link between colonization and the current state of underdevelopment in Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America. This leads to a more refined understanding of why economic development fails to occur even in a period of booming international trade and globalization. Probing into the trade patterns of these nations, this paper answers the following question: Does colonial identity impact trade and growth patterns today? This study finds that history plays a role in determining how countries trade and grow, but the results are varied depending on the analysis utilized. Furthermore, there is a link between the types of goods traded and the growth of a nation, but trade in primary products does not necessarily limit a country’s growth potential.