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  • Thumbnail for Morgan, Ginger
    Morgan, Ginger by Wallace, Andrew

    Virginia “Ginger” Morgan graduated from Colorado College in 1986. She received Masters in Theological Studies from Vanderbilt. She was Assistant Director of Admission at Colorado College from 1987-1990, Associate Chaplain (and Acting Chaplain) from 1990-2005, and Associate Dean of Students 2005-2012. She was interviewed for the LGBT Oral History project on May 17 2012.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College bulletin [2012 April]
    Colorado College bulletin [2012 April] by Colorado College

    A publication for alumni, parents, and friends of Colorado College. Published quarterly per calendar year.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-09-11]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-09-11] by Mamet, Elliott

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Executive Council meeting held on September 11, 2012. Members present include: President Nathan Lee, Student Concerns Vice President Charis Whitnah, Outreach Vice President Pat Knecht, Finance Vice President Stanley Sigalov, Constitutional Vice President Elliott Mamet and Faculty Advisor Professor Peter Blasenheim.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-10-12]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-10-12] by Walden, Jacob , Mia, Mohammad

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Executive Council meeting held on October 12, 2012. Members present include: President Nathan Lee, Student Concerns Vice President Charis Whitnah, Outreach Vice President Pat Knecht, Constitutional Vice President Elliott Mamet, and Associate Dean of Students Rochelle Mason.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-11-05]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-11-05] by Walden, Jacob , Mia, Mohammad

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Executive Council meeting held on November 5, 2012. Members present include: President Nathan Lee, Student Concerns Vice President Charis Whitnah, Outreach Vice President Pat Knecht, Finance Vice President Stanley Sigalov, Constitutional Vice President Elliott Mamet, and Associate Dean of Students Rochelle Mason.

  • Thumbnail for Leviathan [2011-2012 v. 39 no. 3 February]
    Leviathan [2011-2012 v. 39 no. 3 February]

    The Leviathan is CC's student magazine for poetry, prose, visual art and music.

  • Thumbnail for The purple paper : politics monthly [2012-2013 Block 4]
    The purple paper : politics monthly [2012-2013 Block 4]

    The Purple Paper : Politics Monthly is the newsletter of the CC Dems, CC Repubs and the Collaborative for Community Engagement.

  • Thumbnail for Managing the human-wildlife interface in the Lake Manyara National Park region of Tanzania
    Managing the human-wildlife interface in the Lake Manyara National Park region of Tanzania by Ritland, Karen Elizabeth

    Managing the human wildlife interface in Northern Tanzania has become a challenge as human settlements are expanding into zones that have been designated to serve as wildlife corridors and habitats for the region’s wildlife, whose natural habitats are dwindling. This region’s dynamic history has lead to a current population of wildlife that is not representative of its historically lower levels. These high wildlife populations and expanding human populations have forced an increased demand on limited resources. This project studies the human-wildlife interface in Mto wa Mbu, the ward that is a part of the wildlife corridor bordering the northern tip of Lake Manyara National Park. Lake Manyara National Park is a part of the Tarangire-Manyara ecosystem in Northern Tanzania and is an example of a protected area that is vital to mammal populations. It is critical for wildlife to have access to substantial protected regions and migration corridors in order to maintain stable and healthy populations. Both the buffer zones of each protected area and the corridors of protected areas are crucial to the integrity of the biodiversity in the region. This region is also essential to human livelihoods due to its fertile soil as well as proximity to a major road for trade and travel. This project assesses the conflicting goals of the human stakeholders as well needs of wildlife and uses of the area through surveys and geographical analysis. Much of the data and conclusions that were reached in this study parallel the work by Lisa Naughton-Treves, Adrian Treves, and M. Wallgren: all major authors in the field of human wildlife conflict and human wildlife conflict mitigation. In this study, there is direct competition between wildlife of the park and livestock, which aligns with the results of Wallgren et al. (2008). Primates are the most willing of large mammals to go into zones of high impact, but the largest animals are reported by locals to do the most damage, paralleling the conclusions Naughton-Treves et al. (2007). Pastoralists and agriculturalists view the human wildlife interface in different ways due to their different lifestyles and practices, however both believe that short term and immediate solutions are the first step towards solving human wildlife conflict, also found by Treves et al. (2006). This project illustrates the complexity of the interface between wildlife and various human stakeholders and how essential it is to understand the various points of view for planning and conflict mitigation. The goal of this project is to understand this interface thoroughly enough to suggest potential solutions for mitigating the conflicts caused by limited critical resources.

  • Thumbnail for Examining the response of soil nutrients to mastication treatments in Colorado's Front Range ponderosa pine forests
  • Thumbnail for The monthly rag [2011-2012 Block 5]
    The monthly rag [2011-2012 Block 5] by Colorado College. Dept. of Feminist and Gender Studies

    The Monthly Rag, a publication of the Feminist and Gender Studies interns, is found affixed to toilet stall walls around the Colorado College campus.

  • Thumbnail for Noodle juice
    Noodle juice by Parish, Nathan

    A photograph and video created by Colorado College student Nate Parish as part of the course, FG206 Critical Media Studies, taught by Assistant Professor Heidi Lewis during Block 2, 2012.

  • Thumbnail for Cla$$
    Cla$$ by Beckman, Ariane

    A photograph and video created by Colorado College student Ariane Beckman as part of the course, FG206 Critical Media Studies, taught by Assistant Professor Heidi Lewis during Block 2, 2012.

  • Thumbnail for Semi-bilingual children's literature : affirming or distorting Latina/o identities
  • Thumbnail for Louisiana Creoles during the Civil War and Reconstruction
    Louisiana Creoles during the Civil War and Reconstruction by Shapiro, Robert S.

    The study finds unique changes in the Creole’s relationship with the state’s African American population, and traces the development of this change over the course of the Civil War and Reconstruction. The essay is an illustration of the roll of Civil Religion in American Reconstruction history.

  • Thumbnail for Why Wonder Woman matters
    Why Wonder Woman matters by Cartee, Matthew David

    An analysis of the tension between Wonder Woman's prominent place in the modern American mythology of the superhero and the mediocre to poor sales of the Wonder Woman comic book. This essay discusses the dichotomy of the mythic ideal Wonder Woman and what is often presented in the Wonder Woman comic book. The dichotomy is a result of Wonder Woman's status as a transgressive icon that in her characteristics defy the norms of society and the superhero narrative.

  • Thumbnail for The political trajectories of Chen Duxiu and Qu Qiubai, two founding leaders of the Chinese Communist Party : to communism and back again
  • Thumbnail for The Chilean Catholic Church under authoritarianism : a study in strategic unity as exemplified by Archbishop Silva
    The Chilean Catholic Church under authoritarianism : a study in strategic unity as exemplified by Archbishop Silva by Stocker, Bernadette

    Pinochet gained power in 1973 in a coup that followed a period of rapid democratization that had culminated in Salvador Allende’s socialist democracy. In response to society’s new focus on equality during this period, the Church developed a progressive social doctrine that sided with the oppressed masses who had gained power for the first time. When the military junta took power, the Church suddenly had to choose between its new democratic ideals and its historic Latin American strategy of siding with the group in power. Its indecision resulted in a painfully divided compromise between two clearly opposed sides of the Church hierarchy. The upper echelon of the hierarchy, by remaining generally cooperative with the military regime, ensured institutional survival. The lower echelon of the hierarchy, by opposing the regime, kept the Church relevant to the masses that would someday regain power. The disunity within the Chilean hierarchy allowed for new and necessary flexibility that ensured both the Church’s institutional and popular survival under authoritarian rule. However, it was the careful strategy of Archbishop Silva that maintained the necessary unity that allowed the Church to utilize its internal factionalization to survive both the aggression of the dictatorship and the needs of its congregation, and ultimately maintain a critical degree of unity.

  • Thumbnail for Christian identity and multiculture in early Medieval Spain
    Christian identity and multiculture in early Medieval Spain by Ford, Samantha Therese

    An analysis of the process of identity formation and Otherization from the perspective of early medieval Christians of the Iberian Peninsula. Examines multicultural interactions between Iberian Christians, Andalusi Muslims, and Sephardic Jews.

  • Thumbnail for The ethno-ecology of crop diversity in a central Mexican community
    The ethno-ecology of crop diversity in a central Mexican community by Fields, John R., Jr.

    While central Mexico continues to be a cradle of agrobiodiversity, there have been major changes to the agricultural model since the 1960’s, characterized by an overall decrease in crop diversity and a shift from low-input subsistence farming to high-input commercial farming (Sanderson 1986). In light of this trend, this study focuses on agrobiodiversity and the specific practices associated with seed selection, cultivation, and use of diverse crops in central Mexico. Most related efforts have been made at the scale of “farm” or “nation;” the dynamics of agrobiodiversity at the scale of landscape are less well-understood. This study examines crop diversity within a specific community in central Mexico. Both quantitative measures of crop diversity and qualitative ethnographic data are interpreted through the frameworks of ethnobotany, economic botany, agroecology and human ecology. The agro-system of this community appears to be a relatively stable and sustainable form of agricultural syncretism containing high levels of agrobiodiversity. Using this community as a case study, the functional roles and implications of crop diversity on a bioregion are examined. This contextual examination is conducted with an awareness of the biosecurity threats posed by genetic erosion and the potential benefits of in situ conservation.

  • Thumbnail for Architectural regionalism : promoting a sustainable regional design
    Architectural regionalism : promoting a sustainable regional design by Reighley, Stephen Watters

    This study focuses on the nature of and questions concerning the built environment. This paper deals with the concept of creating a regionally appropriate environmental architecture within an increasingly globalized and modernized society. Architectural regionalism is the central theme of this paper and deals with issues surrounding the ability to create buildings that are not only regional in style, but also that function in concert with the local and global environmental and ecological contexts. My thesis is that architectural regionalism, as a way to create a built environment that is connected to the regional climate, resources and culture, results in better and more sustainable places for people to live.

  • Thumbnail for  Redefining historical consciousness in the age of the nation-state
    Redefining historical consciousness in the age of the nation-state by Epstein, Alexandra

    The rise of the nation-state since modernity is a phenomenon that has been studied by theorists across various fields. What is it about the past few centuries that have inspired men to place so much faith in their nation? My paper will seek to ground G.W.F. Hegel’s Philosophy of History as the philosophical work that legitimized the nation’s rise to power, through the construction of a national historical consciousness. Hegel was the first thinker who attempted to unite the subjective self with the objective, by making the objective realizable through a philosophic understanding of history. The nation-state, Hegel suggested, was the ‘end of history’, because through individual thought man found himself to be reflected in his nation. The questions I will ask in my paper are: does Hegel go far enough to ground his extraordinary claim, that we can internalize our historical destiny through reason? How did his claims about history influence his followers, for better or for worse? Have we really reached the ‘end of history’, or did Hegel mean something else by his famous phrase? Last, is it still likely for national history to reveal a shared consciousness in today’s multicultural world? With these questions, I hope to provide a new perspective regarding Hegel’s Philosophy of History, as well as give the discipline of history a new place in our modern world.

  • Thumbnail for La muerte y el narcisismo: un estudio psicoanalítico de las obras de Jorge Luis Borges
  • Thumbnail for Border life
    Border life by Goodman, Sophie Anne

    My stories can be described as “slice of life” stories. In other words, a confined, very specific setting begets a character and defines their unique experience. The defined borders of the environment allow the setting to come alive as much as the characters: the pressures of prep school life motivate three friends to push boundaries with dire consequences; Brooklyn through the eyes of an orthodox Jewish girl becomes a vehicle to highlight specific cultural values and to highlight a foreign land contained in the very familiar; a cartoon artist’s daily route through the streets of Providence catalyzes character transformation when that daily routine is interrupted by Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong; feeling out of place in a city so different from home can result in an affliction of the mind attributed to intense nostalgia and loneliness; and finally, the city of New York becomes as much a part of the narrative as the boys’ journey and coming of age. I credit Henry David Thoreau as my inspiration for the following exploration and the title piece of this collection. Through his experiment in living, Thoreau arrived a place where he found the profound in the very minute: he describes connecting on an intimate level with pine needles, seeing Greek battles in the way that ants marched to and from home, and the connection between Walden Pond and the sky, “sky water”, in a moment of transcendence on a sunny afternoon. The meat of a story and of a character is in the details. For example, the answer to the question of why a certain character chose to wear a particular pair of shoes could be the key to ultimately understanding them. The tradition of the midrash, stories collected in the Talmud from medieval rabbis that attempt to anecdotally explain scripture, also provided a model for the overall structure of many of the stories and the dialogue itself embedded in the stories. Midrashim are told in a manner similar to that of a Socratic dialogue where one rabbi poses a question and others answer with an opposing view. They argue back and forth, in often humorous exchanges, until it results in an absolutely unexpected, yet satisfactory, philosophical conclusion. This structure explores not only the extremes of the larger issue at stake in a story but also highlights the reality of dealing with the person on the other side of the table who may have wildly different life experiences and opinions than you. My goal was ultimately, through my own artistic lens, to capture something human and relatable in each of these stories. I hope that the reader finds that something comes alive for them as well, either in the characters, the plot, or the environments.

  • Thumbnail for "I'm on the in": an integrative Bourdieuian analysis of gender negotiation among female marijuana users at Colorado College
    "I'm on the in": an integrative Bourdieuian analysis of gender negotiation among female marijuana users at Colorado College by Rogers, Katie

    Existing analyses of gender relations in youth marijuana subcultures have consistently shown these social fields to be economically, socially, and culturally male-dominated. Despite this disparity and the questions it raises about the gendered investments and negotiations of woman who tap into this subculture, scholars have yet to employ case-specific, qualitative methods to investigate the subjective experiences of female marijuana users. Building on contemporary feminist integrations of gender into Pierre Bourdieu’s theories of social reproduction, this thesis uses the hybrid concepts of gendered field, gendered capital, and gendered habitus to perceive a typology of female marijuana users at Colorado College from 17 purposively sampled interviews. I posit that of the four observable types – guest moochers, honorary den bros, token stoner chicks, and independent floaters – two exhibit distinct forms of gender reflexivity, a self-consciousness of gender investments, negotiations, and constraints as components of a socially constructed game rather than as biological imperatives. These two forms of gender reflexivity – which I call tactical resignation and emergent reflexivity – raise further questions about the capacity for inquiry and discourse to induce reflexivity and the experience of marginalized gender identities in other social fields.

  • Thumbnail for Masculine mesclun : the management of vegetarian masculinities
    Masculine mesclun : the management of vegetarian masculinities by Lang, Brendan

    In this thesis, I studied differences in conceptions and practices related to food and gender between males, females, vegetarians, and meat-eaters, with the key focus surrounding Male Vegetarians. I conducted a correspondence analysis of food and gender conceptions and supplemented it with information from five interviews with Male Vegetarians. I collected data by surveying Colorado Springs vegetarians and meat eaters, then entered the data into Ucinet 6 matrices and analyzed the results. From an online vegetarian “meet up” group, I found male volunteers for supplemental interviews that enabled interesting relationships shown in the correspondence data to be discussed in detail to better understand Vegetarian Male opinions, beliefs, and actions. I found that Vegetarian Men, as deviants of consumptive practices and gender performance, are excluded from normal status-seeking and power-building practices. However, aligned with their greatly individualized identities as vegetarians, these men have developed individualized definitions and strategies for managing and redefining their masculinity.