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  • Thumbnail for The Asclepian [2012 v. 1 issue 2]
    The Asclepian [2012 v. 1 issue 2]

    Compiled by Colorado College Students for Global Health. The Asclepian is an independent publication of the Students for Global Health Club. The newsletter was started in order to educate the student body about current issues affecting public and global health.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-10-30]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-10-30] by Walden, Jacob , Mia, Mohammad

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Executive Council meeting held on October 30, 2012. Members present include: President Nathan Lee, Student Concerns Vice President Charis Whitnah, Finance Vice President Stanley Sigalov, Constitutional Vice President Elliott Mamet, and Faculty Advisor Professor Peter Blasenheim.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-10-05]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Executive Council minutes [2012-10-05] by Walden, Jacob

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Executive Council meeting held on October 5, 2012. Members present include: President Nathan Lee, Student Concerns Vice President Charis Whitnah, Outreach Vice President Pat Knecht, Finance Vice President Stanley Sigalov, and Constitutional Vice President Elliott Mamet.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Student Government Association : Full Council minutes [2012-10-31]
    Colorado College Student Government Association : Full Council minutes [2012-10-31] by Mia, Mohammad

    Minutes of the Colorado College Student Government Association Full Council meeting held on October 31, 2012.

  • Thumbnail for The purple paper : politics monthly [2012-2013 Block 4]
    The purple paper : politics monthly [2012-2013 Block 4]

    The Purple Paper : Politics Monthly is the newsletter of the CC Dems, CC Repubs and the Collaborative for Community Engagement.

  • Thumbnail for An analysis of alternatives for water distribution between municipal and agricultural users of Colorado River water
    An analysis of alternatives for water distribution between municipal and agricultural users of Colorado River water by Hardin, Sally

    The Colorado River is often referred to as the “lifeblood” of the American Southwest, as it sustains rapidly growing cities, feeds millions of agricultural acres, and forms some of the world’s most incredible natural features. The Colorado River is also one of the most highly dammed, diverted, and otherwise regulated rivers in the world. In the last few decades, the demands on the flows of this river have begun to exceed its supply, which is threatened not merely by over-allocation but also by drought and climatic uncertainties. The river’s dwindling supplies are no longer enough to support the Southwest’s rapid population growth in municipal areas while simultaneously answering to the demands of the more senior water rights holders, the agriculturalists. This thesis is an exploration of the current contentions between agricultural and municipal users of Colorado River water, with a focus on the alternatives available to address these ongoing issues. Of many options, including increased infrastructure and various conservation measures, water banking has been identified as the strategy most socially, economically, and environmentally qualified to address these pervasive imbalances in water supply and demand of the Colorado River.

  • Thumbnail for THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERSPECTIVE: METAPHOR AND EMPATHY IN LEOPOLD’S LAND ETHIC
    THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERSPECTIVE: METAPHOR AND EMPATHY IN LEOPOLD’S LAND ETHIC by Harmon, Jonathan Scott

    Aldo Leopold’s land ethic takes root in both metaphor and empathy. The use of metaphor and empathy in cultivating the land ethic has profound implications for our relations with the environment, both personal and political. I hope to show that these implications are positive and help us to realize the ethical extension vital to ensuring human harmony with nature. In pursuit of this, I first provide a deeper look into metaphor, empathy, alterity, and their overlap. I then put these ideas into the context of Leopold’s land ethic as described in A Sand County Almanac. Then I dissect the philosophical implications of metaphor and empathy in an environmental ethic. Finally, I suggest representation as a pragmatic instantiation of the ethic prescribed by metaphor and empathy. At the end of all, I think, is a compelling case made for the vital integration of more subjective modes of inquiry into the realm of ethics.

  • Thumbnail for The History and Future Prospects of Colorado Conservation Easements
    The History and Future Prospects of Colorado Conservation Easements by Stewart, Allison A

    Understanding the history, purpose, requirements and benefits of conservation easements provides the necessary background for a grasp of what land trust organizations are currently doing, and can do, to ensure that perpetuity of conservation is upheld. An explanation of the dynamic reality and of the challenges of conservation easements that are posed by global climate change is emphasized. The intent is to comprehensively develop the concept of conservation easement, to illuminate the inherent benefits and challenges of permanent land conservation, and then identify a series of suggestions. Recognizing the ways in which conservation easements can be strengthened, mostly by changing the language, is a noble step toward improving the environment and hopefully will contribute to a stronger, healthier, and more sustainable environment for the future.

  • Thumbnail for Micrometeorological feedbacks at treeline : are the trees at the leading edge responsible for increased local temperatures?
    Micrometeorological feedbacks at treeline : are the trees at the leading edge responsible for increased local temperatures? by Anderson, Joshua

    Mounting research on alpine treeline advance suggests that global and regional temperatures do not completely explain changes in treeline elevation and distribution. Rather, micrometeorological feedbacks may play an important role in treeline advance by increasing local temperatures. On Pikes Peak, the comparison of a transition zone microclimate at treeline to an adjacent rockslide microclimate at the same elevation showed that the transition zone microclimate heats more quickly and to a higher maximum temperature than the rockslide. Observed differential heating is particularly prevalent in the near-surface soil temperature, an important location for seedling establishment and growth. During the June observation period, daytime temperature maximums in the transition zone soil were 7C warmer on average than in the rockslide. Local warming at the treeline’s leading edge suggests that the presence of trees increases soil heat flux through a variety of mechanisms. Canopy warming, varying soil moisture, and sheltering are each considered independently as possible causes of differential heating. First, I investigate the possibility that heat captured in the canopy warms the transition zone microclimate. However, this theory is unsupported by data showing daytime canopy transpiration and cooling, and infrared photos revealing that the canopy is significantly cooler than the rockslide during the day. Second, I explore whether higher soil moisture in the transition zone is responsible for differential heating via increased conduction. However, soil moistures are actually lower in the treeline microclimate, suggesting that low soil moisture may be a characteristic of warming rather than its cause. Third, I look at the idea that trees shelter the microclimate from wind and hence reduce heat loss. While sheltering effects show some relationship with differential heating, there is no consistent correlation between high wind and differential heating. While this analysis does not offer a clear cause of differential warming, a better understanding of the treeline system is gained, and suggestions are made for how and where to look for warming feedbacks in the future. Thus, while results are inconclusive, warming feedbacks at treeline that increase soil temperatures during the critical growing season should be further considered as factors in treeline advance.

  • Thumbnail for THE ANTS GO MARCHING A Study of Formicidae Movement Between and Within Yucca Plants
    THE ANTS GO MARCHING A Study of Formicidae Movement Between and Within Yucca Plants by O'Brien, Rebecca

    Ants and aphids are involved in a mutualistic relationship whereby the aphids produce a sugary waste product which the ants then harvest as food. We were interested in exploring the dynamics of this relationship, and specifically how ant movement was influenced by the distribution of aphids and the distribution of members of their own species. For this study, we focused on the interactions between the two insects on the flowering racemes of yucca glauca in the Rocky Mountains region. Ant populations showed patterns of both single and double attractors, with the number of attractors likely driven by aphid number (we did not have sufficient data to confirm this statistically). Although aphids proved to be a factor in determining the number of attractors, they were not significant in determining the number of ants on a plant or the number of ants entering or exiting that plant. Playing a much larger role in determining arrivals and departures was the number of focal ants, with increased numbers of focal ants lead to increased numbers of arrivals and departures from the plant. The number of ants on the nearest neighbor also impacted ant movement, but it influenced only arrival rates and not departure rates. The degree to which neighboring plants showed similar dynamics varied greatly between plants, but there were certain plants which correlated to a particularly great degree with their neighbors. These plants tended to be those with the most aphids.

  • Thumbnail for The monthly rag [2012-2013 Block 3]
    The monthly rag [2012-2013 Block 3] by Colorado College. Dept. of Feminist and Gender Studies

    The Monthly Rag, a publication of the Feminist and Gender Studies interns, is found affixed to toilet stall walls around the Colorado College campus.

  • Thumbnail for The monthly rag [2011-2012 Half Block]
    The monthly rag [2011-2012 Half Block] by Colorado College. Dept. of Feminist and Gender Studies

    The Monthly Rag, a publication of the Feminist and Gender Studies interns, is found affixed to toilet stall walls around the Colorado College campus.

  • Thumbnail for Is Lady Gaga a feminist?
    Is Lady Gaga a feminist?

    A video created by Colorado College students as part of the course, FG110 Introduction to Feminist and Gender Studies, taught by Assistant Professor Heidi Lewis during Block 5, 2012.

  • Thumbnail for Delectible
    Delectible by Settineri, Margeaux

    A photograph and video created by Colorado College student Margeaux Settineri as part of the course, FG206 Critical Media Studies, taught by Assistant Professor Heidi Lewis during Block 2, 2012.

  • Thumbnail for Shit boys say
    Shit boys say

    A video created by Colorado College students as part of the course, FG110 Introduction to Feminist and Gender Studies, taught by Assistant Professor Heidi Lewis during Block 5, 2012.

  • Thumbnail for Diabetes
    Diabetes by Johnson, Savannah

    A photograph and video created by Colorado College student Savannah Johnson as part of the course, FG206 Critical Media Studies, taught by Assistant Professor Heidi Lewis during Block 2, 2012.

  • Thumbnail for Semi-bilingual children's literature : affirming or distorting Latina/o identities
  • Thumbnail for What was the turning point of World War II?
    What was the turning point of World War II? by Moore, Jeffrey Andrew

    This paper focuses on what the turning point of World War II was from several different points of view. One is the Battle of Stalingrad, and the other is Hitler's military leadership throughout the war.

  • Thumbnail for The ethno-geology of Shiprock, Navajo Volcano Fields, New Mexico
  • Thumbnail for The Environmental Protection Agency’s review of the Pebble Mine : key considerations for a large-scale mining proposal in Bristol Bay, Alaska
  • Thumbnail for Translation : Fahrenheit 451
    Translation : Fahrenheit 451 by Burt, Nathanael Lujan

    A translation of Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. In a futuristic society in which books are banned and the government knows all, how can a seventeen-year-old girl change the way that Montag sees the world?

  • Thumbnail for Encroachment
    Encroachment by Vitousek, Malia Catherine

    A novella following high school senior Connor Nolan and his complicated relationships with friends, family, and the sport of football.

  • Thumbnail for Locating access to the immigration debate: analyzing the complex practices and propensities of intellectual production within the field of Immigration think tanks
    Locating access to the immigration debate: analyzing the complex practices and propensities of intellectual production within the field of Immigration think tanks by Barcelo, Emma Lee

    My thesis examines the role that think tanks play in the immigration policy debates. Drawing from Pierre Bourdieu’s concepts of social space and fields of power, I critically analyze the space that immigration think tanks occupy and the influence they demonstrate with regard to their relational positioning in this space. According to Thomas Medvetz (2008:9-10), think tanks can be understood as an “organizational device for gathering and assembling forms of authority conferred by the more established institutions of academics, politics, business and the media” (Medvetz 2008: 9-10). By analyzing the intellectual products written by experts from five distinct think tanks, I seek to uncover the strategies, practices and propensities of each organization. This analysis allows for situating each organization in relation to each other. I also include in the analysis each think tanks unique orientation to the proximate locations of power. For my thesis, I examine a think tank sample that includes the Urban Institute (government contract model orientation); Migration Policy Institute (academic orientation); National Immigration Forum (economic orientation); Federation for American Immigration Reform (ideological orientation); and National Network for Immigrant and Refugee Rights (grassroots orientation). By coding the policy-oriented publications of each think tank, I create a conceptual field through which I can visualize each organizations unique location in relation to each other. This field emerged out of positioning each organization on two primary axes: (1) the epistemological axis, which measures whether the legitimacy and/or authority of the intellectual products rest upon academic/scholarly/objective evidence or more upon a popular/narrative evidence and (2) the political rationale/axis, which measures whether the intellectual products on US immigration policy reflect a focus on its national impact or on a more comprehensive goal of internationally recognized human rights. I explore a third axis, which measures the interests that are being promoted (if any) in terms of business interests vs. worker interests. I conclude with a discussion as to which think tank is the most effective among the five and I explain why I think their particular characteristics put them in their particular position such that they have the greatest potential to influence immigration policy.

  • Thumbnail for Friendly competition : a case study of the supporter groups of the Colorado Rapids and glocalization
    Friendly competition : a case study of the supporter groups of the Colorado Rapids and glocalization by Franklin, Samuel

    The increasing presence of supporter groups, or organized fan groups driven by diverse cultural practices, of the Colorado Rapids has resulted in a non-traditional American spectator experience for some fans at games and is an area suitable for sociological study due to gaps in the body of literature. Using Giulianotti and Robertson’s (2007) theory of glocalization as a lens, this thesis examines the forces that are influencing the supporter groups. This study investigates the effect of the forces of globalization on the supporter groups of the Colorado Rapids. Qualitative methods and in-depth interviews were used to obtain information about these processes. This study found three forces simultaneously competing with one another in an effort to become the cultural norm for spectators at Colorado Rapids games.

  • Thumbnail for Masculine mesclun : the management of vegetarian masculinities
    Masculine mesclun : the management of vegetarian masculinities by Lang, Brendan

    In this thesis, I studied differences in conceptions and practices related to food and gender between males, females, vegetarians, and meat-eaters, with the key focus surrounding Male Vegetarians. I conducted a correspondence analysis of food and gender conceptions and supplemented it with information from five interviews with Male Vegetarians. I collected data by surveying Colorado Springs vegetarians and meat eaters, then entered the data into Ucinet 6 matrices and analyzed the results. From an online vegetarian “meet up” group, I found male volunteers for supplemental interviews that enabled interesting relationships shown in the correspondence data to be discussed in detail to better understand Vegetarian Male opinions, beliefs, and actions. I found that Vegetarian Men, as deviants of consumptive practices and gender performance, are excluded from normal status-seeking and power-building practices. However, aligned with their greatly individualized identities as vegetarians, these men have developed individualized definitions and strategies for managing and redefining their masculinity.