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  • Thumbnail for The Catalyst [2008-2009 v. 39 no.18 March 6]
    The Catalyst [2008-2009 v. 39 no.18 March 6]

    The Catalyst is the weekly student newspaper of Colorado College. This issue was published March 6, 2009.

  • Thumbnail for The Catalyst [2008-2009 v. 39 no.13 January 23]
    The Catalyst [2008-2009 v. 39 no.13 January 23]

    The Catalyst is the weekly student newspaper of Colorado College. This issue was published January 23, 2009.

  • Thumbnail for The Catalyst [2008-2009 v. 39 no.16 February 20]
    The Catalyst [2008-2009 v. 39 no.16 February 20]

    The Catalyst is the weekly student newspaper of Colorado College. This issue was published February 20, 2009.

  • Thumbnail for It's amazing how different we aren't
    It's amazing how different we aren't by Rubin, Amy

    The project analyses movement of two girls with very different genetic make-up. Both featured girls have genetic disorders. The project examines the movements of these two girls using LABAN movement analysis.

  • Thumbnail for Economic integration of sovereign states and their development
    Economic integration of sovereign states and their development by Colorado College

    Poster created for W.P. Carey Nobel Laureate Lecture Series entitled, "Economic Integration of Sovereign States and their Development," by Edward C. Prescott, to be held on [Monday], March 2, [2009] in Gaylord Hall, Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Challenges to technology transfer : a literature review of the constraints on environmental technology dissemination
    Challenges to technology transfer : a literature review of the constraints on environmental technology dissemination by Johnson, Daniel K. N. , Lybecker, Kristina M.

    This paper considers the challenges to the dissemination of environmental innovation. Following a brief exploration of the legal and regulatory regimes surrounding environmental technologies, the paper examines diffusion mechanisms, market factors, social characteristics and political elements that facilitate and complicate dissemination. Given the importance of innovation to economic development and growth, the diffusion of innovation is of great interest to economists and policymakers alike.

  • Thumbnail for Emerging U.S. climate policy : where we are and how we got here
    Emerging U.S. climate policy : where we are and how we got here by Clemm, Geoffrey , Smith, Mark Griffin

    After eight years of non-engagement, the new administration and the U.S. Congress, led by a majority in the President’s party, are rapidly developing climate policy legislation. This paper summarizes past efforts to establish a national climate policy in the United States as well as the major forces influencing the current debate. While this debate is largely shaped by domestic considerations, it takes place as the international community moves to agree on a post-Kyoto policy regime in Copenhagen next December. Whether the United States is willing to take strong action will significantly influence the actions of other nations.

  • Thumbnail for KBR11
    KBR11

    Like KRB10, plagioclase and clinopyroxene are intergrown in an almost graphic texture, though where KRB10 was dominated by the unknown mineral, in KRB11, that unknown mineral is confined to spherulite-like clusters in a fine-grained quartz matrix. Iddingsite alteration is much less extensive. Western Minerals Inc. as an 'interstitial ferrotholeiite, very highly fractionated…textures are similar to those associated with rapidly frozen or highly viscous melts.'

  • Thumbnail for SC-18
    SC-18

    The fine-grained groundmass in this sample consists of indistinguishable quartzofeldspathic phases. Phenocrysts both feldspar phases are clustered together; the cores of most are absent, perhaps due to plucking during the making of the thin section or possibly due to resorption. Hornblende phenocrysts are very incomplete and anhedral. Biotite phenocrysts are much smaller and subhedral in shape.

  • Thumbnail for SC-15
    SC-15

    This fine-grained, hypidiomorphic, inequigranular plutonic rock is intermediate in composition, with plagioclase as the dominant feldspar. K-feldspar is present in much lower abundance, and quartz is scarce. Mafic phases include anhedral biotite and hornblende, the latter of which is strongly chloritized.

  • Thumbnail for SC-22
    SC-22

    The plagioclase laths in this microporphyritic basalt are separated by size into seperate groundmass and phenocryst populations. Glass and opaques are the other groundmass phases. Clinopyroxene and its periodic pseudomorph calcite are additional phenocrysts.

  • Thumbnail for BATUR 1918
    BATUR 1918

    Subhedral phenocrysts of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and olivine are scattered randomly throughout this basalt. Plagioclase has a sieve texture and is frequently zoned. The corners of most grains are rounded. Both clinopyroxene and olivine are generally equant in shape and olivine is more abundant than the pyroxene. All three phases show some degree of resorption. The groundmass contains moderately-sized crystals of all three phases. This sample is very fresh and unaltered.

  • Thumbnail for JPN-18
    JPN-18

    The largest crystals in this sample, visible in handsample, are clinopyroxene, much of which has strong exsolution lamellae. Much smaller are the olivine crystals, which have subsequently been broken into a serpentine-framed mosaic of optically-continuous fragments.

  • Thumbnail for BATUR 94 FL
    BATUR 94 FL

    Sieve textured plagioclase blocks and laths dominate the phenocrystic population in this microporphyritic vesicular basalt. Clinopyroxene phenocrysts are less abundant. Both phases are found with glass as constituents of the groundmass.

  • Thumbnail for 57-K-91
    57-K-91

    This vesicular basalt contains microphenocrysts of olivine and orthopyroxene, both of which are also lesser components of the groundmass which consists mainly of uniformly-sized plagioclase laths. The olivine phenocryst have weak reaction rims. Some plagioclase is zoned and sieved.

  • Thumbnail for KBR10
    KBR10

    The unknown mineral is the prominent mineral in this thin section. It forms a dusty brown, isotropic matrix with a faint dendritic texture in which subhedral clinopyroxene and plagioclase grains are set. Clinopyroxene, where isolated, is strongly altered to iddingsite. The degree of alteration is much lower where plagioclase and clinopyroxene grains are intergrown. The two minerals have an almost graphic intergrowth texture. Western Minerals Inc. as an 'interstitial ferrotholeiite, very highly fractionated…textures are similar to those associated with rapidly frozen or highly viscous melts.'

  • Thumbnail for KBR15
    KBR15

    According to Western Minerals Inc., this sample is a 'contact rock from sediment immediately above dolerite,…rock with quartz 'spots'–probably inverted from tridymite spherulites–in a matrix of devitrified glass with mullite and cordierite.' Due to the fine-grained nature of the sample, it is difficult to distinguish individual mineral phases in the allotriomorphic, equigranular, microcrystalline groundmass. The only noteworthy features in this thin section are the spherical, slightly coarser grained nodules with orange-brown rims.

  • Thumbnail for JPN-3
    JPN-3

    The olivine that is so conspicuous in the JPN-3 handsample is conspicuously absent in thin section and represented by a mere 1 or 2 grains. Rather, phenocrysts of plagioclase and pyroxenes dominate the phaneritic phases. Both phases are subhedral and the plagioclase in particular indicates several different generations of growth. Some plagioclase is concentrically zoned, though most grains contain alternating inclusion-rich and poor zones. Inclusions are of pyroxenes and glass blebs. The groundmass contains glass, plagioclase microlites, and tiny pyroxenes.

  • Thumbnail for SC-11
    SC-11

    Phenocrysts in this thin section are subhedral k-feldspar with strong Carlsbad twins, subhedral plagioclase, anhedral, granular quartz aggregates, and skeletal biotite with granular hematite rims. The groundmass is a granular, amorphous quartzofeldspathic mixture.

  • Thumbnail for SC-7
    SC-7

    The groundmass of this microporphyritic basalt consists of glass and plagioclase microlites. Subhedral plagioclase phenocrysts are roughly aligned and some are concentrically zoned. Subhedral, plucked, clinopyroxene phenocrysts of variable size are less abundant than those of plagioclase.

  • Thumbnail for SC-7A-BL
    SC-7A-BL

    The groundmass of this porphyritic basalt is predominantly glass with less abundant plagioclase microlites. The most readily-identifiable mineral of the phenocryst population is plagioclase. Of greater abundance are euhedral, opaque pseudomorphs. Rare inclusions of pyroxene are observed within these opaques. Pockets of chalcedony disrupt the otherwise uniform groundmass.

  • Thumbnail for JPN-15
    JPN-15

    This inequigranular mosaic of pyroxenes and olivine is highly fractured. Subparallel swarms of high-density fractures are visible throughout and contain the highest concentrations of serpentine. The infilled minerals of one conspicuous vein have a nice comb texture.

  • Thumbnail for SC-4-BL
    SC-4-BL

    Phenocrysts of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and iddingsite pseudomorphs after olivine–presumably–are surrounded by a groundmass of unoriented plagioclase microlites, glass, and localized calcite. Plucking of the phenocrysts is noticable and vesicles are present.

  • Thumbnail for SC-10-BL
    SC-10-BL

    Indiscernable, amorphous quartzofeldspathic crystals, opaques, and glass comprise over 95% of this thin section. The remainder are subhedral quartz and feldspar phenocrysts. The handsample contains biotite flakes and feldspar phenocrysts up to 8 mm in length, none of which were captured in thin section.

  • Thumbnail for 58-K-91
    58-K-91

    Unoriented plagioclase laths and interstitial glass and clinopyroxene make up the groundmass of this vesicular basalt. Olivine and orthopyroxene microphenocrysts are scattered throughout.