Colorado College Logo

  DigitalCC

Use AND (in capitals) to search multiple keywords.
Example: harmonica AND cobos

286 hits

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College alpine journal [2009 v. 3]
    Colorado College alpine journal [2009 v. 3]

    The Colorado College Alpine Journal is a collection of climbing related stories and articles based on the experiences and adventures of Colorado College alumni and students. Contents for this issue include descriptions of climbs in North America, South America, Africa and Asia.

  • Thumbnail for The Catalyst [2008-2009 v. 39 no.16 February 20]
    The Catalyst [2008-2009 v. 39 no.16 February 20]

    The Catalyst is the weekly student newspaper of Colorado College. This issue was published February 20, 2009.

  • Thumbnail for The monthly rag [2009-2010 Block 2]
    The monthly rag [2009-2010 Block 2] by Colorado College. Dept. of Feminist and Gender Studies

    The Monthly Rag, a publication of the Feminist and Gender Studies interns, is found affixed to toilet stall walls around the Colorado College campus.

  • Thumbnail for It's amazing how different we aren't
    It's amazing how different we aren't by Rubin, Amy

    The project analyses movement of two girls with very different genetic make-up. Both featured girls have genetic disorders. The project examines the movements of these two girls using LABAN movement analysis.

  • Thumbnail for La tertulia [2008-2009 v. 25 no. 1 Winter]
    La tertulia [2008-2009 v. 25 no. 1 Winter] by Colorado College. Dept. of Southwest Studies

    La Tertulia is the newsletter of the Hulbert Center for Southwest Studies of the Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Global commodity chains and industrial upgrading strategies : a case study in the specialty coffee market
    Global commodity chains and industrial upgrading strategies : a case study in the specialty coffee market by Waud, Tucker

    This case study examines the commodity chain and industrial upgrading concepts and applies them to the international coffee industry. By examining research on previous upgrading strategies, the study will analyze the potential implications of the buyout of Starbucks by the coffee producing countries. Due to the nature of the coffee industry in each of the top three coffee producing countries, Brazil and Colombia will benefit from the acquisition, while Vietnam will not experience positive effects. Farmer cooperatives in producing countries are the keys to discovering new methods of industrial upgrading.

  • Thumbnail for The entrepreneur [2009-2010 Issue No. 5 Fall]
    The entrepreneur [2009-2010 Issue No. 5 Fall] by Colorado College. Dept. of Economics and Business

    The Entrepreneur is the official newsletter of the Colorado College Department of Economics and Business.

  • Thumbnail for KBR19
    KBR19

    Fragmental quartz chunks in glass with occasional glass-surrounded plagioclase clusters. Western Minerals Inc. indicates this sample has partially melted to glass with tridymite developed.

  • Thumbnail for BATUR 94 FL
    BATUR 94 FL

    Sieve textured plagioclase blocks and laths dominate the phenocrystic population in this microporphyritic vesicular basalt. Clinopyroxene phenocrysts are less abundant. Both phases are found with glass as constituents of the groundmass.

  • Thumbnail for SC-16
    SC-16

    The groundmass in this thin section is a salt-n-pepper mixture of fine-grained, amorphous quartzofeldspathic phases. All phenocryts are subhedral in shape, and the largest of these, the k-feldspar and plagioclase are host to abundant hematite-filled fractures. Biotite and hornblende phenocrysts are much smaller. A few spherulites, seen more clearly in plane than cross polarized light, are found in the groundmass.

  • Thumbnail for JPN-16
    JPN-16

    This thin section has a diabasic texture. While the plagioclase has remained relatively unaltered, clinopyroxene has been almost entirely pseudomorphed by serpentine. Anhedral clusters of calcite is found throughout.

  • Thumbnail for SC-6
    SC-6

    The range in grain size for the plagioclase laths in this thin section is continual from the groundmass euhedral microlites to the subhedral phenocrysts. Concentric zoning and sieve textures are common in the plagioclase phenocrysts. Clinopyroxene phenocrysts are also subhedral, commonly twinned, and infrequently clustered in glomeroporhpyroclasts. In addition to plagioclase, the groundmass contains clinopyroxene, opaques, and serpentine.

  • Thumbnail for KBR2
    KBR2

    The dominant texture in this gabbro is an ophitic intergrowth of equant plagioclase laths within larger, subhedral, clinopyroxene grains. Alteration of some phases to chlorite, talc and iddingsite is localized and occurs more in non-ophitic sections of the rock.

  • Thumbnail for SC-12
    SC-12

    This groundmass heavy thin section is comprised of indistinguishable quartzofeldspathic phases. Round hematite nodules locally stain the groundmass around them. Anhedral phenocrysts of k-feldspar have been almost entirely replaced by sericite.

  • Thumbnail for KBR3
    KBR3

    The clinopyroxene abundance in this thin section is lower than other gabbros from Birds River, lending more of a subophitic texture to the rock. Plagioclase is the most dominant mineral. Iddingsite is less abundant.

  • Thumbnail for BATUR 1918
    BATUR 1918

    Subhedral phenocrysts of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and olivine are scattered randomly throughout this basalt. Plagioclase has a sieve texture and is frequently zoned. The corners of most grains are rounded. Both clinopyroxene and olivine are generally equant in shape and olivine is more abundant than the pyroxene. All three phases show some degree of resorption. The groundmass contains moderately-sized crystals of all three phases. This sample is very fresh and unaltered.

  • Thumbnail for JPN-18
    JPN-18

    The largest crystals in this sample, visible in handsample, are clinopyroxene, much of which has strong exsolution lamellae. Much smaller are the olivine crystals, which have subsequently been broken into a serpentine-framed mosaic of optically-continuous fragments.

  • Thumbnail for JPN-13
    JPN-13

    As is characteristic of a harzburgite, this sample is greater than 90% olivine, with a few large clinopyroxene grains, fracture-infilled serpentine, and occasional, moderately-sized rutile grains making up the remaining constituents of the rock. Serpentinization is minimal.

  • Thumbnail for 59-K-91
    59-K-91

    This vesicular basalt contains microphenocrysts of olivine and orthopyroxene, both of which are also lesser components of the groundmass which consists mainly of uniformly-sized plagioclase laths. The olivine phenocryst have weak reaction rims. Some plagioclase is zoned and sieved.

  • Thumbnail for SC-13
    SC-13

    The least altered phase in this thin section is plagioclase, which forms roughly aligned, variably sized laths that make up both the groundmass, which is dominantly glass, and the phenocryst population. A second phenocryst, clinopyroxene, remains only as inclusions in the calcite pseudomorphs that replaced it. Vesicles, clays, and hematite pseudomorphs are abundant in this thin section.

  • Thumbnail for JPN-3
    JPN-3

    The olivine that is so conspicuous in the JPN-3 handsample is conspicuously absent in thin section and represented by a mere 1 or 2 grains. Rather, phenocrysts of plagioclase and pyroxenes dominate the phaneritic phases. Both phases are subhedral and the plagioclase in particular indicates several different generations of growth. Some plagioclase is concentrically zoned, though most grains contain alternating inclusion-rich and poor zones. Inclusions are of pyroxenes and glass blebs. The groundmass contains glass, plagioclase microlites, and tiny pyroxenes.

  • Thumbnail for SYH-3D-2
    SYH-3D-2

    This thin section consists of several zones. The first, a fine-grained glaucophane schist. The boundaries between individual glaucophane crystals frequently blur. Aggregates of sphene are stretched out lines paralleling the complexly folded foliation. This zone is abruptly cut by a green, omphacite-rich band, bordered on each sided by a greater concentration of sphene. In the third zone, the glaucophane fabric is interleaved with elongate aggregates of omphacite, epidote and sphene.

  • Thumbnail for SYH-1D-2
    SYH-1D-2

    Glaucophane, muscovite, sphene, and elongate aggregates of epidote-group minerals define the foliation in this thin section. Poikiloblastic garnet and omphacite grains contain inclusions which include glaucophane and rutile and the host minerals show resorption textures.

  • Thumbnail for SYH-1R
    SYH-1R

    Aligned, elongate, millimetric-scale actinolite crystals dominate this thin section. Layers of actinolite crystals are interleaved with layers of chlorite. Basal sections of actinolite, which show fabulous amphibole cleavage are strongly plucked, leaving patchy void spaces throughout the thin section.

  • Thumbnail for SC-14
    SC-14

    But for the anhedral quartz microphenocryss in this vesicular rhyolite, the rest is a clay-altered glass.