Colorado College Logo

  DigitalCC

Use AND (in capitals) to search multiple keywords.
Example: harmonica AND cobos

415 hits

  • Thumbnail for Leviathan [2007-2008 v. 33 no. 4 Spring]
    Leviathan [2007-2008 v. 33 no. 4 Spring]

    The Leviathan is CC's student magazine for poetry, prose, visual art and music.

  • Thumbnail for The Catalyst [2008-2009 v. 39 no.11 December 12]
    The Catalyst [2008-2009 v. 39 no.11 December 12]

    The Catalyst is the weekly student newspaper of Colorado College. This issue was published December 12, 2008. Page 4 of issue incorrectly dated October 10 and out of sequence. Page 2 of issue printed twice.

  • Thumbnail for The Catalyst [2008-2009 v. 39 no. 5 October 10]
    The Catalyst [2008-2009 v. 39 no. 5 October 10]

    The Catalyst is the weekly student newspaper of Colorado College. This issue was published October 10, 2008. Page 9 of issue incorrectly dated September 17.

  • Thumbnail for Hamlet Police: Guildenstern
    Hamlet Police: Guildenstern by Ames, Gypsy

    A costume rendering by Gypsy Ames, professor of Drama and Dance at Colorado College. Renderings were created using a variety of media and may be in color or black and white. Some include swatches of fabric.

  • Thumbnail for Ending Civil Wars: Combatants strategies and incentives to disarm. Poster.
    Ending Civil Wars: Combatants strategies and incentives to disarm. Poster. by Colorado College

    Poster created for lecture entitled,"Ending Civil Wars: Combatants strategies and incentives to disarm," by Natacha Lemasle to be given on December 17, [2008?] in Palmer Hall, Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College sociology newsletter [2008-2009 Fall]
    Colorado College sociology newsletter [2008-2009 Fall] by Colorado College. Dept. of Sociology

    The Colorado College Sociology Newsletter is an occasional publication issued by the Department and provides news related to its students, faculty and alumni.

  • Thumbnail for Anthropology Department newsletter [2008-2009 Issue No. 7 Fall]
    Anthropology Department newsletter [2008-2009 Issue No. 7 Fall] by Colorado College. Dept. of Anthropology

    The Department of Anthropology Newsletter is an occasional publication issued by the Department and provides news related to its students, faculty and alumni.

  • Thumbnail for Economic development : global and local perspectives
    Economic development : global and local perspectives by Colorado College

    Poster created for the Economics and Business Department Student Advisory Board's Annual Symposium entitled, "Economic Development: Global and Local Perspectives," to be held from February 26 through March 12, [2008]. Lectures include: "Saving People Money So They Can Live Better: A Global Perspective," by Ray Bracy; "Sustainable Solutions: Innovation, Poverty and Pollution," by Paul Hudnut; "Economic Development for Colorado From a Global Perspective," by Don Elliman. Sponsored by the Schlessman Fund, the Department of Economics and Business, and the Student Advisory Board, Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Does HAVA help the have-nots? US adoption of new election equipment, 1980-2008
    Does HAVA help the have-nots? US adoption of new election equipment, 1980-2008 by Lybecker, Kristina M. , Johnson, Daniel K. N.

    During the tabulation of votes in the 2000 presidential election, the world was shocked at the technological inadequacy of electoral equipment in many parts of the US. In reaction to public dismay over "hanging chads", Congress quickly enacted the Help America Vote Act (HAVA), legislation to fund the acquisition of advanced vote-counting technology. However, the intention was to enable, rather than mandate, choices of new electoral equipment. This paper takes advantage of a unique historical opportunity to test whether electoral equipment follows the pattern predicted by well-established models of innovation diffusion, merging electoral data with census data on socioeconomic characteristics. We infer that fiscal constraints to acquisition are strong but are not the only limitations to technology adoption, particularly within certain types of easily identifiable populations.

  • Thumbnail for ERB-09b
    ERB-09b

    This metamorphosed granite has a weak spaced foliation defined by moderately aligned elongate minerals and slight compositional layering. The opaque phases are segregated into two discrete bands, along which, large quartz grains show a crystallographically preferred orientation, causing them to appear nearly isotropic. Alternatively, this nearly isotropic phase could be untwinned leucite, however, an the lack of twins and association with the remaining phases is unlikely. The chlorite and muscovite phases appear to be collectively pseudomorphing a preexisting phase, as evidenced by dark, elongate inclusions within the chlorite grains.

  • Thumbnail for LS-03
    LS-03

    Moderately sorted, subangular, matrix-supported, quartz and glauconite sandstone with calcite and hematite matrix. Quartz is undulatory with subgrain walls developing and potassium feldspar twins are deformed. Pockets of finer-grained material contain rounded epidote grains.

  • Thumbnail for 515
    515

    This hypidiomorphic inequigranular granite has rather scalloped grain boundaries, particularly among the quartzofeldspathic phases, though the biotite grains exhibit similar textures with the feldspars. One anhedral biotite grain has bulbs protruding into the neighboring k-feldspar grain. Quartz extinction is uniform. Olivine is present in trace amounts and the highly-fractured phase is typically surrounded by a thick rim of iddingsite.

  • Thumbnail for schorlite ll to C
    schorlite ll to C

    This schorl crystal is oriented parallel to the c-axis to aid in finding interference figures

  • Thumbnail for 44-4207 relief-scale
    44-4207 relief-scale

    These six minerals are mounted on one slide to show comparative relief.

  • Thumbnail for 507
    507

    Most crystals in this thin section are highly embayed, including the distinctive riebeckite grains.

  • Thumbnail for A-18-6B
    A-18-6B

    The subhedral hornblende crystals in the sample align with the micas to form a spaced foliation separating microlithons of plagioclase and quartz. Equant subhedral epidote crystals punctuate the rock. Biotite and chlorite are typically interfingered and chlorite display anomalous blue interference colors. Elongate granular aggregates of light brown to colorless titanite are present.

  • Thumbnail for 27-2A
    27-2A

    A continuous foliation in this sample is defined by aligned hornblende grains. Altered biotites are poikiloblastic and have kink bands causing undulose extinction. The aligned hornblende grains are juxtaposed against equigranular polygonal-interlobate quartz and aggregates of altered and decussate muscovite and clinozoisite.

  • Thumbnail for ERB-06a
    ERB-06a

    This thin section contains two distinct populations. The background 'matrix' consists of seriate-interlobate feldspar and quartz, with both phases exhibiting microstructures indicative of strain. A decussate fabric of biotite, chlorite, kyanite, and opaques are distributed in pods throughout the quartz and feldspar 'matrix'. Close examination of these pods reveals poikiloblastic host mineral, presumably k-feldspar, which is almost entirely obscured by inclusions. Zircons with radiation halos are extensive within this poikilobastic phase.

  • Thumbnail for LS-05
    LS-05

    This porous, fine-grained, well-sorted, well-rounded, clast-supported quartz sandstone is cemented together with hematite. Clasts of microcline, hornblende, calcite, and chert are dispersed in minor amounts throughout the sample. The layering which is visible to the naked eye is unnoticeable in thin section.

  • Thumbnail for SS-3674-6
    SS-3674-6

    This porphyritic sample contains phenocrysts of augite, olivine, and pseudoleucite. Olivine has an iddingsite rim when in contact with the groundmass. The pseudoleucite phenocrysts are a colorless and cloudy, roundish eight-sided crystals with first-order grey birefringence and extinction occurs in amoeboid-shaped sections within the phenocryst. These same pseudoleucite crystals make up the majority of the groundmass, along with calcite, k-feldspar and other alteration products. Three copies of this thin section contain the contact zone itself, with a calcite and clay-rich, layered Eagle sandstone.

  • Thumbnail for LS-07
    LS-07

    This micritic limestone contains lenticular, semi-spherical, and hexagonal fossils, all calcareous themselves.

  • Thumbnail for BB8
    BB8

    Large k-feldspar and quartz crystals provide a backdrop for the smaller, less well-preserved mafic phases in this sample. Decomposing biotite is frequently found interfingered with chlorite. Hornblende grains are rather skeletal. Plagioclase crystals have relatively rounded corners and tend to cluster together. Large anhedral aggregates of sphene are interspersed in the interstices between k-feldspar grains.

  • Thumbnail for quartzite A-E
    quartzite A-E

    A seriate-interlobate texture defines this quartzite. Grain boundary migration is evident from thickened and lobate grain boudaries. Subgrain walls are prevalent, as is undulose extinction. Recrystallization textures are present in portions of the thin section. Useful for finding interference figures

  • Thumbnail for BB28
    BB28

    The most noteworthy feature in this thin section is the micrographic intergrowth between quartz and k-feldspar that pervades the rock. The k-feldspar is dirty in appearance due to alteration to clay. Biotite, which is interfingered with chlorite, is subhedral to anhedral and riddled with inclusions.

  • Thumbnail for A-6-7
    A-6-7

    A continuous foliation for this sample is defined by aligned hornblende, micas, elongate quartz grains and granular aggregates of epidote and clinozoisite. Quartz is either equant or elongate with a granular texture. The hornblende phase is generally subhedral in shape, as are biotite crystals, which appear to be pseudomorphing an earlier mineral phase as evidenced by abundant inclusions. Radiation halos can be found in this sample though their occurrance is rare.