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92 hits

  • Thumbnail for Los Chamacos
    Los Chamacos by Ortega, Trinidad

    Chimayo, New Mexico. Mexican folk song popularized by Rosales y Robinson on 78 r.p.m. Columbia platters (1918). Recited. Quality: Fair

  • Thumbnail for El zapatero
    El zapatero by Romero, Alberto

    Albuquerque, New Mexico. In this folk song, el zapatero (the cobbler) and el camisero (the haberdasher) figure as objects of children's mock anger at not getting their tailor-made apparel as ordered. Quality: poor. PLEASE NOTE: this should be number 10 of 27 songs on the audiofile.

  • Thumbnail for Entriega de novios
    Entriega de novios by anonymous

    Espanola, New Mexico. Instrumental accompaniment. Quality: fair. PLEASE NOTE: this should be number 2 of 12 songs on the audiofile.

  • Thumbnail for La vaquerita
    La vaquerita by Romero, Alberto

    Albuquerque, New Mexico. This folk dance seems to be of New Mexican origin. Quality: poor. PLEASE NOTE: this should be number 11 of 27 songs on the audiofile.

  • Thumbnail for La varsoviana
    La varsoviana by Romero, Alberto

    Albuquerque, New Mexico. Recording levels vary. Quality: fair/poor. PLEASE NOTE: this should be number 13 of 14 songs on the audiofile.

  • Thumbnail for El chote
    El chote by Romero, Alberto

    Albuquerque, New Mexico. Dance also known as a chotis. Quality: fair/poor. PLEASE NOTE: this should be number 14 of 14 songs on the audiofile.

  • Thumbnail for untitled
    untitled by Chavez, Mary

    Grants, New Mexico. See item 39.2. Quality: good/fair. PLEASE NOTE: this should be number 4 of 6 songs on the audiofile.

  • Thumbnail for untitled
    untitled by Chavez, Mary

    Grants, New Mexico. See item 39.2. Quality: good/fair. PLEASE NOTE: this should be number 6 of 6 songs on the audiofile.

  • Thumbnail for Don Gato
    Don Gato by Sandoval, Donisio

    Truchas, New Mexico. In search of a mate, Don Gato (Mr. Cat) falls from a roof and breaks three ribs and dislocates an arm. On his deathbed he requests, as a last wish, some chicken soup. Recited. Quality: fair.

  • Thumbnail for La ultima cena and Nino, pues va a pagar
    La ultima cena and Nino, pues va a pagar by Rivera, Julian

    San Juan Pueblo, New Mexico. No listing in Cobos index. Recited. Quality: fair.

  • Thumbnail for Entriega de bautismo
    Entriega de bautismo by anonymous

    Unknown location. No listing in Cobos index. Quality: fair/poor. PLEASE NOTE: this should be number 7 of 10 songs on the audiofile.

  • Thumbnail for La tierra de Jauja
    La tierra de Jauja by anonymous

    Albuquerque, New Mexico. Old Spanish song describing a Utopian land (Jauja). Quality: Fair.

  • Thumbnail for Corrido de Luz Arcos
    Corrido de Luz Arcos by anonymous

    Albuquerque, New Mexico. Singer gives his interpretation of a corido on the death of Luz Arcos in 1930. Quality: Fair.

  • Thumbnail for Vamonos, companeros
    Vamonos, companeros by anonymous

    Albuquerque, New Mexico. Drought forces villagers to abandon their homes in San Izar. Fragment. Quality: Fair.

  • Thumbnail for Entriega de bautismo
    Entriega de bautismo by Ortiz, Jacinta

    Rowe, New Mexico. The custom of sponsors baptizing a child, then taking the child from the church to the home and returning the godchild to his or her parents. Recited. Quality: Fair.

  • Thumbnail for Entriega de novios
    Entriega de novios by Cruz, Patricio

    Chimayo, New Mexico. Twenty-six traditional New Mexican wedding verses. Quality: Fair/Poor.

  • Thumbnail for Versos de chiquiado
    Versos de chiquiado by Romero, Alberto

    Albuquerque, New Mexico. Dance game involving the recitation of poetic strophes by the participants. The game has to do with coaxing a dance partner to leave her chair placed in the middle of the dance floor so the dancing can resume. May be a commercial recording. Quality: fair. PLEASE NOTE: this should be number 5 of 16 songs on the audiofile.

  • Thumbnail for Valse de pano
    Valse de pano by Romero, Alberto

    Albuquerque, New Mexico. Particular waltz danced with a handkerchief (pano). Recording levels vary. Blank spot in recording. Quality: poor. PLEASE NOTE: this should be number 12 of 14 songs on the audiofile.

  • Thumbnail for Versos de chiquiada
    Versos de chiquiada by Romero, Alberto

    Albuquerque, New Mexico. Quality: fair. PLEASE NOTE: this should be number 4 of 27 songs on the audiofile.

  • Thumbnail for Valse de cadena
    Valse de cadena by Romero, Alberto

    Albuquerque, New Mexico. Originally the valse de cadena was so-called because the dancers formed a cadena or chain as they danced around the dance floor. Of all the valses, this is one of the most interesting to perform and to watch Recording cut off. Quality: fair. PLEASE NOTE: this should be number 6 of 16 songs on the audiofile.

  • Thumbnail for Alegrias
    Alegrias by Romero, Alberto

    Albuquerque, New Mexico. Alegrias (Joys) is a Spanish folk dance that has not taken root among the Spanish-speaking people of New Mexico. Recordings of this and some other folk dances are usually played for the music they contain. May be a commercial recording. Recording levels vary. Quality: fair. PLEASE NOTE: this should be number 10 of 16 songs on the audiofile.

  • Thumbnail for Desde que llegue a esta punto
    Desde que llegue a esta punto by Romero, Alberto

    Albuquerque, New Mexico. In this late nineteenth-century Mexican-American folk song, the singer-composer is making fun of his efforts to learn English. Quality: poor. PLEASE NOTE: this should be number 7 of 27 songs on the audiofile.

  • Thumbnail for Las espuelas
    Las espuelas by Romero, Alberto

    Albuquerque, New Mexico. Las espuelas (The Spurs) is a Spanish folk dance not as popular as some of the other New Mexico and southern Colorado folk dances. Combines rhythms of the waltz and the polka. May be a commercial recording. Quality: good/fair. PLEASE NOTE: this should be number 8 of 16 songs on the audiofile.

  • Thumbnail for Las mananitas
    Las mananitas by Romero, Alberto

    Albuquerque, New Mexico. Originally "Las mananitas" (early Morning Song) was sung to greet the new day. Later it became a birthday song. Performed here as a waltz. Quality: good/fair. PLEASE NOTE: this should be number 15 of 16 songs on the audiofile.

  • Thumbnail for Las mananitas
    Las mananitas by Romero, Alberto

    Albuquerque, New Mexico. Originally "Las mananitas" (early Morning Song) was sung to greet the new day. Later it became a birthday song. Performed here as a waltz. Quality: good/fair. PLEASE NOTE: this should be number 15 of 16 songs on the audiofile.