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  • Thumbnail for Ikuta Jinja - An ema with a wish
    Ikuta Jinja - An ema with a wish

    This ema reads, "May Bun-chan's leg [or foot] heal quickly and may he graduate without any difficulty." Imprinted on the ema to the left is a place for the name and address of the petitioner, which is given in full. The petitioner's name is female; presumably this is a mother praying for her son.

  • Thumbnail for Ikuta Jinja - Map of shrine
    Ikuta Jinja - Map of shrine

    This map of the shrine compound is erected near the entrance.

  • Thumbnail for Ikuta Jinja - Plaque before enshrined tree
    Ikuta Jinja - Plaque before enshrined tree

    This plaque in front of the tree with the himorogi says that the tree was over 500 years old when it was severely injured by burns received in the bombing of Kobe during WWII. However, even though shattered, it managed to stay alive, and so became revered as a symbol of rebirth and resuscitation. The plaque refers to it as a "divine (kami) tree."

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Street scene, advertising, Charlie Chaplin
    Japan, 1951: Street scene, advertising, Charlie Chaplin

    Only on holidays are the beautiful kimono seen in significant numbers. 'Charlie Chaplin' proves that Japanese businessmen also believe that 'It pays to advertise.' --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  National Peace Memorial Hall, sign stating number of fatalities from the bomb by the end of 1945
    Hiroshima: National Peace Memorial Hall, sign stating number of fatalities from the bomb by the end of 1945

    The A-bomb devastated nearly all administrative agencies and destoyed official documents. Thus, the exact number of deaths due to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima remains unknown. Many victims were never identified. -- According to a document submitted by the city of Hiroshima to the United Nations in 1976 entitled 'For the Elimination of Nuclear Weapons and the Reduction of All Armed Forces and All Armaments,' an extimated 140,000 (plus or minus 10,000) people died as a result of the A-bomb between August 6, 1945, and the end of December that year.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  National Peace Memorial Hall, sign telling facts about the power of the explosion
    Hiroshima: National Peace Memorial Hall, sign telling facts about the power of the explosion

    The atomic bomb dropped at 8:15 a.m., August 6, 1945, exploded at an altitude of approximately 580 meters over the city of Hiroshima. It emitted heat rays, blast, and radiation. In the vicinity of the hypocenter, heat from the bomb raised surface temperatures to 3,000 to 4,000 degrees C. and generated a blast that bkew 440 meters per second (aoubt 984 miles per hour). Simultaneously, an enormous amount of radiation was emitted. These three forms of energy instantly destroyed the entire city, indiscriminatey taking many precious lives.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima Memoir:   Tamiko Tsunematsu
    Hiroshima Memoir: Tamiko Tsunematsu by Tsunematsu, Tamiko

    Passage from the Memoir of Tamiko Tsunematsu (female) -- “The flames licked closer and closer, but my mother and I were not able to save either of them. [My sister called out,] ‘Mother, Tami-chan, hurry and get away. I will die here.’ Right after she said those words, my sister seemed to lose consciousness. ‘Rei-chan, I’m sorry. Forgive me, forgive me!,’ I sobbed. As I walked away I looked back, calling out ‘Forgive me, forgive me!’ I felt as if I would go mad. Mother and I held hands tightly. Then we looked back at our home neighborhood and put our hands together in prayer. The whole of our neighborhood was up in flames all around.â€

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Grave marker records the death of an entire family
    Hiroshima: Grave marker records the death of an entire family

    Innumerable monuments in Hiroshima mourn the loss of those who died in the A-bombing. Monuments have been erected not just in Peace Memorial Park, but in parks throughout the city and alongside roads by neighborhood associations, schools, public offices and companies. Inscriptions on graves conjure memories of 'that day.' Some tell of entire families wiped out.

  • Thumbnail for Grocery Store Display:  Chilled Coffee and Tea
    Grocery Store Display: Chilled Coffee and Tea

    Chilled coffees and teas in a local shop.

  • Thumbnail for Grocery Store Display: Instant Ramen
    Grocery Store Display: Instant Ramen

    Instant Ramen, always a popular item, is shown here, pre-packaged with bowls.

  • Thumbnail for ATM, close-up 1
    ATM, close-up 1

    A closer look at a Japanese ATM.

  • Thumbnail for Kids Day KFC Style
    Kids Day KFC Style

    The colonel gets into the spirit on Chldren's Day in Japan by dressing up samurai style.

  • Thumbnail for Mail Counter
    Mail Counter

    Counters in a Japanese post-office

  • Thumbnail for Map of Regions of Japan
    Map of Regions of Japan

    A poster with maps of regions in Japan at the Hokkaido post office.

  • Thumbnail for New Year's Cards
    New Year's Cards

    A sheep announces it's a new year, the year of the Sheep.

  • Thumbnail for Mail Box
    Mail Box

    A mail-drop box at the Hokkaido Post Office

  • Thumbnail for School Children's Poster
    School Children's Poster

    Children's drawings adorn this poster.

  • Thumbnail for Grocery Store Display:  Cheeses, Close-up
    Grocery Store Display: Cheeses, Close-up

    A close-up of some cheeses in a Japanese grocery store.

  • Thumbnail for Makeovers
    Makeovers

    Four women got new hair-cuts in January's issue of "Lee".

  • Thumbnail for Grocery Store Display:  Fish
    Grocery Store Display: Fish

    Different kinds of fresh fish ready to be prepared.

  • Thumbnail for Tales of Ise, Sagabon edition
    Tales of Ise, Sagabon edition

    Published by Suminokura Soan. "Sagabon versions of Ise Monogatari (Tales of Ise), which were published in ten separate editions, allowed this tenth-century collection of poem tales to assume its place as one of the best-known Japanese classics. The book consists of 125 brief chapters, each usually centering on a poem or two, recounting courtier and various companions. At first glance it may be hard to tell that these volumes were printed with movable wooden type. The connected characters appear to be written with a brush, but close examination reveals that no more than two or three kana characters are connected. The anonymous woodblock-printed illustrations of these Ise editions are derived from hand-drawn manuscripts with limited circulation." - abridged from description by John T Carpenter.

  • Thumbnail for Crane Scroll, Part 1
    Crane Scroll, Part 1 by Koetsu, Hon'ami , Sotatsu, Tawaraya

    The scroll, almost fifteen meters long, was designed to be viewed section by section. Delicate silver cranes dance across a golden shore, gliding through clouds of gold, sometimes in graceful formation, other times frolicking. The lavish gold and silver under painting, attributed to Tawaraya Sotatsu, captures the eye first, however it was not intended to be viewed as a self-sustaining composition, but rather as a background to highlight the darlky inked strokes created by the calligrapher's brush. Boldly inscribed by Hon'ami Koetsu in his distinctive calligraphic style, the texts include famous court verses, one by each of the Thirty-six Immortal Poets 0 famous poets of ancient Japan. - from text by John Carpenter.

  • Thumbnail for Flower Prices
    Flower Prices

    Example prices at a flower shop .

  • Thumbnail for Heartbreak
    Heartbreak

    Recipients of ashes of the war dead were hard pressed to find solace in the thought that their beloved had the honor of dying for the Emperor.

  • Thumbnail for Manga
    Manga

    A close up on Inu Yasha and Ranma 1/2 manga at a bookstore.