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  • Thumbnail for Ikuta Jinja - Banner on main gate of Ikuta Jinja
    Ikuta Jinja - Banner on main gate of Ikuta Jinja

    This banner advertises an upcoming festival, on July 15th, that will feature the lighting of a thousand lanterns, the rope circle through which one may walk (chinuwa kuguri), and a purification rite aimed at "countering obstacles, eliminating illness and vanquishing troubles."

  • Thumbnail for Main gate of Henjoko-in at Koyasan
    Main gate of Henjoko-in at Koyasan

    This is just one of hundreds of such massive entrance gates to a temple in the town of Koyasan.

  • Thumbnail for Random view from main path to Okunoin
    Random view from main path to Okunoin

    The pillar to the left designates the small hall behind the tree as one dedicated to some practices of the Shingon school.

  • Thumbnail for Ikuta Jinja - Shrine fortune telling
    Ikuta Jinja - Shrine fortune telling

    This is a "mikujior&quo box, from which one draws a paper packet in which is written a fortune. The fortune is printed on a small piece of paper and, if it is auspicious, a visitor will usually fold it into a long, thin strip and then tie it around a small branch of a tree in the shrine compound. It is as if this act also ties a bond between one's future and the deity of the temple: one wishes that the kami will help fulfill your good fortune. If the fortune does not bode well, the visitor has the option of taking another mikuji (which usually costs less -- this box says, "first fortune 200 yen," a little under $2).

  • Thumbnail for New grave marker
    New grave marker

    This new stone rests on a site that must have held a much older marker before. I believe the inscription on the sphere reads, "Meet together in one place," which would refer to a belief that some Buddhists have that they will join together after death in the Pure Land of the Buddha Amida.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 22  --  "Finding a husband by his leather belt"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 22 -- "Finding a husband by his leather belt" by Ogasawara, Shodo

    Finding a husband by his leather belturvivo -- Explanation by the artist: his leA woman (perhaps 34 or 35) with a baby on her back brought what seemed to be her mother-in-law, a woman of about 60, to the place where bodies were being kept. She had spent two days searching the city fruitlessly for her husband. All of the bodies were black from soot and dirt and terribly swollen. 'This leather belt is definitely my husband's. The face is also similar. I'm sure it's him.' A reunion of tears. -- 1290m from the hypocenter, on the grounds of Sumiyoshi Shrine, Kako-machi (now Sumiyoshi-cho). The artist was 17 at the time of the bombing, 74 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 18  --  "A line of burned lunchboxes"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 18 -- "A line of burned lunchboxes" by Takeuchi, Isamu

    A line of burned lunchboxes, Art -- Exlpanation by the artist: buriedAfter morning assembly, they were probably doing calisthenics. They seemed to be junior high students. I wonder where the owners of these lunchboxes were, laid out so neatly. Because this drill ground was near the hypocenter, the lost lunchboxes were burned but still retained their shape, which makes my heart ache. Thinking of the kindness and love some mother put into each, for them to become last lunches. . . -- 360 m from the hypocenter, Western Drill Ground, Moto-machi. The artist was 25 at the time of the bombing, 82 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 21  --  "Sister, holding brother grown cold"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 21 -- "Sister, holding brother grown cold" by Tagashira, Tadayuki

    Sister holding brother grown cold -- Explanation by the artist: "This girl went out searching for her younger brother in the morning. About two hours before this picture, she found him. 'I want water! I want water!' he said, so she gave him some. He drank it happily. 'Sister, sister, I'm cold! I'm cold!' he said, so she held him. His body gradually grew colder and colder, then he breathed his last." -- 900m from the hypocenter, in front of the main gate of the Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital. The artist was 43 at the time of the bombing, 72 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Street scene, advertising, Charlie Chaplin
    Japan, 1951: Street scene, advertising, Charlie Chaplin

    Only on holidays are the beautiful kimono seen in significant numbers. 'Charlie Chaplin' proves that Japanese businessmen also believe that 'It pays to advertise.' --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Election Day in Tokyo
    Japan, 1951: Election Day in Tokyo

    Election Day in an industrial area of Tokyo shows political representatives using megaphones as 'loudspeakers' as they describe the virtues of their candidates. Each party representative awaits his turn. One candidate is fined for spending over $3,000. on election expenses! Because all Japanese are literate we can more easily understand why 90% exercise their right to vote. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Seller of pots, pans, and other household necessities
    Japan, 1951: Seller of pots, pans, and other household necessities

    Japan, 'the workshop of the Orient,' produces quantities of pans, pails, and kettles of iron and aluminum. Such exports we once sold principally in the Orient, but now they are sent to Africa and Latin America --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Grocery Store Display:  Frozen Shrimp
  • Thumbnail for Grocery Store Display:  Fish
    Grocery Store Display: Fish

    More fish for sale.

  • Thumbnail for Grocery Store Display:  Purin aka "Jello"
    Grocery Store Display: Purin aka "Jello"

    There are many different kinds of jello (purin) in Japan, from apple to coffee-flavored.

  • Thumbnail for Grocery Store Display:  Kinoko
    Grocery Store Display: Kinoko

    Various roots, mushrooms, and vegetables.

  • Thumbnail for Post Office: Jihan 2
    Post Office: Jihan 2

    A closer look at a post-card/stamp machine.

  • Thumbnail for Post Office: Jihan 1
    Post Office: Jihan 1

    A post-card and stamp machine in Hokkaido.

  • Thumbnail for Post Office Drop Box
    Post Office Drop Box

    PO Boxes wait for mail in Hokkaido.

  • Thumbnail for Mail Box
    Mail Box

    A mail-drop box at the Hokkaido Post Office

  • Thumbnail for Exit Sign
    Exit Sign

    An exit sign warns cars not to enter.

  • Thumbnail for Grocery Store Display:  Cheeses, Close-up
    Grocery Store Display: Cheeses, Close-up

    A close-up of some cheeses in a Japanese grocery store.

  • Thumbnail for Counter
    Counter

    Text: Go-jiyuu ni otori kudasai

  • Thumbnail for Fruit Stand
    Fruit Stand

    A fruit stand is set up on the sidewalk for people to browse as they shop.

  • Thumbnail for Grocery Store Display:  Fish
    Grocery Store Display: Fish

    Different kinds of fresh fish ready to be prepared.

  • Thumbnail for Heartbreak
    Heartbreak

    Recipients of ashes of the war dead were hard pressed to find solace in the thought that their beloved had the honor of dying for the Emperor.