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  • Thumbnail for Jeffries, Karl
    Jeffries, Karl by Wallace, Andrew

    Karl Jeffries came to Colorado College from a small town in Southern Colorado in 1987 and graduated in 1991. He was diagnosed with HIV shortly after graduation and now lives in Berkeley, California with his partner and two kids. Karl was interviewed for the LGBT Oral History project during his visit for homecoming weekend on October 16, 2011.

  • Thumbnail for Dunn, Ellen Marie Dalrymple
    Dunn, Ellen Marie Dalrymple by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Ellen was born in Lipol(?) New Mexico on September 6, 1907. Her parents had twelve children. Her father had a stroke shortly after they moved to Meeker in hopes of buying a ranch. Soon they moved to Rifle where the older brothers and sisters, including Ellen, worked to support the family (drugstore clerk, babysitting). She talks about reading, home remedies, illness, education, and puberty. Ellen married Phil Dunn at twenty-three. Her husband worked for the Colorado State Highway Dept. They moved all over the state as roads were built. She describes: rustic housing, cooking, cold winters, road crew communities, and moving often. She lived in Rangely in a tent for a time during the oil boom. She describes the community and the building of the roads. They finally settled in Grand Junction where her husband worked in the pipe business. She describes: women's clubs, activities, marriage, divorce, and working. Ellen died in 1989.

  • Thumbnail for Campbell, Esther Anderson (Chandler)
    Campbell, Esther Anderson (Chandler) by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Esther was born in Harmony, Minnesota in 1899. She came to teach in the Skull Creek School from Denver when she was twenty-two. She boarded with a family who lived near the school. She soon married a local cowboy, Duard Campbell, and moved into his mother's homestead dugout cabin, which she describes. She continued teaching until retirement. They later moved to Brown's Park and raised cattle. Esther had one child who lived in Denver with her mother until he was school age because she had to teach. She talks about: hard winters, living conditions, social gatherings, school programs, isolated rural schools, the Home Demonstration Club, Freddie Blevins, June Sweeney, her husband's home duties, and Ute Indians. Esther died in 1995.

  • Thumbnail for Kenney, Glee Cloward
    Kenney, Glee Cloward by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    When she was eight years old, Glee came to the Rangely area with her father and two siblings (1921?). Her mother had just died of diabetes. Her father had worked in the coal mines in Winterquarters, Utah where Glee was born in 1913. Her father leased a ranch near Rangely where he felt he could take better care of the three children. She describes: household chores, winter activities, dances, school, puberty, and clothing. Glee also describes the town of Rangely and what staples her family bought at the one store. She talks about their food sources: meat from cows, and hunting. Glee married Lester Kenney at seventeen and lived on several ranches owned by her husband's father in the Rangely area. She had three children and went to Vernal, Utah and Grand Junction, Colorado for their births. She describes the small school in Rangely (twelve children) that had teachers who boarded with local families. Glee died in 2000.

  • Thumbnail for Levkulich, Mary Birovchak
    Levkulich, Mary Birovchak by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Mary came to the United States from Austria-Hungary when she was eighteen. She was born in 1896. She was the only child of six in her family who got to immigrate and tells of coming through Ellis Island by herself. She lived in New York City, and then moved to Minersville, Penn. where she met her husband, George Levkulich, also an immigrant. They moved wherever he could find work in coal mines. They moved to the Craig area in 1926 and found they had to buy 160 acres because all the homesteading land in Breeze Basin was taken. She tells many stories about: poor living conditions, learning to drive horses, raising 300 chickens, raising animals, growing crops, and butchering and storing meat. She describes "the shack" they first had on their farm and living conditions. Mary had seven children. They had several fire disasters with the chickens and crops. She talks about killing a rattlesnake, and getting rid of gophers. Mary talks about: baking bread in a coal stove, making clothes, and preserving food. She was afraid to visit her home in "Europe" because she would have to deal with the Russian Embassy. Mary died in 1990.

  • Thumbnail for Eberle, Janet Mortimer
    Eberle, Janet Mortimer by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Janet was born in Kersey, Colorado on February 11, 1911. She came to the Craig area in 1918 with her parents, as an only child. They lived on her grandfather's ranch on Little Bear, for three years. They moved to various rural schools where her mother taught and her father helped at the school and worked at odd jobs. Then they filed on a homestead in 1925 and Janet's mother continued to teach in rural schools. Janet talks about: women being able to support themselves, homestead work, home schooling, clothing, puberty, play as a "tomboy", and play with sleds and skis. Janet describes: the homestead cabin, cooking, food preservation, sleeping with quilts and flat irons, lack of illness, health concerns in her rural community, death of neighbor from self abortion, and care of the deceased. She talks about: Craig high school activities, college, and her own teaching in rural schools. She married Ernest at twenty-six and had two children in her mid-thirties. Their home was in Hamilton on a ranch, where she served as census enumerator and Moffat County Superintendent of Schools.

  • Thumbnail for Lyons, Iris Self
    Lyons, Iris Self by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Iris's parents came from Georgia to Spring Gulch, two miles north of Williams Fork in Moffat County in 1914 with seven children. Iris was born in 1905. The nearest neighbor was 5 miles away. Her father had a college education and taught at the Wattle Creek school and was also a preacher. Her mother found life much harder than in Georgia. Iris describes life on the homestead: garden, cows, wheat, deer, hogs, clothing, play, puberty, and the one room school. For high school the children stayed in a rented house in Craig while their parents stayed on the ranch. Iris was interested in science and wanted to be a nurse. She went to Denver General Hospital for nurses training after high school. She describes some early nursing techniques and home remedies. Iris came home to marry Wayne Lyons and they lived on the Lyon's family homestead in Breeze Basin in 1930 and had four children. She worked as a nurse when she was needed. At one point they would have closed the Hayden hospital if not for her. Later she worked at the Craig hospital. Iris died in 1999.

  • Thumbnail for Warren, Doris Stephenson
    Warren, Doris Stephenson by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Doris's mother was born on the trip west in a covered wagon train from Indiana. Doris's grandparents came to the Meeker area in 1889 to homestead on Flag Creek. Her grandmother, Minirva Wilson, told her about the trip west. Doris describes: the homestead cabin, the reservoir, home remedies, and cooking. Doris's mother, Goldie May Stephenson, went to college in Boulder at the University, against her father's wishes, and Doris relates stories of her experiences. She returned to Meeker to teach in the Coal Creek School and in Meeker. Goldie May stopped teaching when her children were born, but went back because of the Great Depression. She was also elected Rio Blanco County Superintendent of Schools, but had to resign because she was pregnant. Goldie May tended to sick people during the 1918 flu, and Doris relates her mother's experiences during that time. Doris grew up in Meeker. She didn't attend college because of lack of funds. She worked in the County Clerk's office, until she ran for County Treasurer and was elected, the first woman elected to that post. She talks about working women and working mothers.

  • Thumbnail for Rector, Stella B. LaForce
    Rector, Stella B. LaForce by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Stella was born in Oak Creek, Colorado and grew up near McCoy, Colorado on a ranch until she was six years old when her father died. She had five siblings. Stella's mother moved the family to Glenwood Springs so that she could work and her children could finish high school. The children spent summers on the ranch. She talks about: homemade clothing, working during the depression, and summers on the ranch. Stella married Jay Rector and traveled with him to construction jobs. Later they worked on the Kirk ranch, and finally on her husband's father's ranch, both near Rangely. She talks about her husband's mother, who had ten children and first came to the area in 1898 at six years old. Stella describes: washing clothes, cooking for family and extra help, gardening, sewing, roundup, and needlework. The ranch was twenty miles from town, and she saw few neighbors. She liked the chores outside, but not the cooking. She had four children, and talks about her daughter's education, etc. Stella describes the town library, 4H, and women's clubs. Stella died in 1991.

  • Thumbnail for Hoth, Jayne White
    Hoth, Jayne White by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Jayne was born at home in Sunbeam, Colorado in 1918. Her grandmother, Sarah Farrell, came to the Sunbeam area to homestead as a single woman in 1887 from Ohio. She came at age thirty-two because she hadn't married and was considered a failure. She married a cowboy in 1890. Sarah was a practical nurse and delivered many babies in this remote area. Jayne tells stories of her grandmother and mother living on the homestead: home remedies, dances, food, outside work, and isolation in the winter. Jayne talks about her own childhood as a "tomboy." When she started school she went to a rural school and then moved to Denver to live with her grandparents. She returned to the Maybell area in 1944 at age twenty-six with one son and divorced. She married again to Carl E. "Mike" Hoth, and lived on ranches where her husband worked. Jayne cooked for the ranch hands and also worked outside with her husband. They had three children. Jayne talks about: ranch life, hobbies, and clubs. Jayne died in 1989.

  • Thumbnail for Sweeney, June Marion O'Connell
    Sweeney, June Marion O'Connell by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    June was born in Leadville, Colorado in 1904. She graduated from Colorado State College of Education in Greeley and accepted a job in Maybell in 1925(?). She lived in the motel and met a local cowboy, Henry Sweeney, who became her husband. They lived on the land his father had homesteaded in 1896. She tells stories about her trip to Maybell, and her year of teaching. She talks about her marriage, honeymoon, and new home seven miles south of Lay. June talks about: her pregnancies, riding a horse, teaching in rural schools, teaching in Craig, serving as the Moffat County School Superintendent. Her husband did the housework when she was too busy. June relates stories of her mother-in-law, who came from Ireland. She was a maid in Meeker when she met Pat Sweeney and they homesteaded in Lay. She talks the illness of one adult son. June died in 1987.

  • Thumbnail for Idol, Lana Gregory
    Idol, Lana Gregory by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Lana was born in Elk, Wyoming in 1915. When she was three years old her mother died of cancer and she came to Meeker with her five siblings to live with her Aunt Purdy. Her father continued to run the ranch in Wyoming. After three years they went back to Wyoming to live on the remote ranch. She describes life on the ranch: work, play, school, and transportation. Lana attended high school in Meeker and to receive some "feminine attention." Aunt Purdy took care of thirteen motherless children and homesteaded in the summers. Lana married Loren Idol and had seven children. Loren's parents homesteaded near Meeker in 1916 and Lana tells stories of their lives. Nellie Idol was a rural school teacher. Nellie used home remedies to help people when they were ill (Chuck White). Lana talks about the births of her children and general after birthing care. Lana died in 2006.

  • Thumbnail for Louis R. and Leah Lucile Ehrich family
    Louis R. and Leah Lucile Ehrich family by Ehrich, Leah Lucile , Ehrich, Louis R., 1849-1911

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 49, Louis R. and Leah Lucile Ehrich family include: 25 “Yellow Kid” buttons; 55 “Flag” buttons; 17 “Campaign” buttons; 2 souvenir medals of the 1895 and 1898 Flower Carnivals; 1 handwritten note, dated August 5, 1901, “To my dear descendent, from your great-great-grandmother, who is at present twelve years old.”; 1 10-page, handwritten letter, dated July 24, 1901, addressed “To my Fellow-Townspeople of Colorado Springs in the Year 2001,” signed by Louis R. Ehrich; 1 2-page, typewritten copy of a letter, dated March 24, 1898, addressed to the President of the United States, calling for non-intervention in Cuba, with typed names of 51 prominent male citizens of Colorado Springs; 1 5-page, handwritten letter, dated August 4, 1901, written in praise of Louis Ehrich by his daughter, signed by Leah Lucile Ehrich; 4 b&w photos, “Louis R. Ehrich. Aug/01.”; 3 b&w photos, “Henriette Ehrich, taken in Colorado Springs in 1900.”; 1 b&w photo, “Rebecca Ehrich. Taken in 1897 at Colorado Springs.”; 1 b&w photo, “Caroline Minzie, Mother of Henriette Ehrich. April 5/97”; 1 paperbound copy of “A Message from the Old to the New Century: A Religion for All Time”; written by Louis R. Ehrich, published in “The Arena” in 1893; 1 2-page, handwritten letter, dated August, 1901, addressed to “My dear descendants,” signed by Louis R. Ehrich; 1 11-page, typewritten letter, dated August 3, 1901, addressed “To My Descendants Who May Be Living in the Year 2001,” giving information on the Ehrich family, signed by Louis R. Ehrich; 1 printed pamphlet “Hymns for Dedication of ‘The Century Chest,’ Perkins Fine Arts;Hall.”; 1 hardbound copy of The Question of Silver by Louis R. Ehrich, inscribed by the author; 1 paperbound copy of “Proceedings of the Conference of the National Committee of the Sound Money Democracy, held at Indianapolis, Ind., August 7, 1896”. 1 printed pamphlet “The Gold Standard” and “The Folly and Futility of Fighting Evolution” by Hon. Joseph M. Carey and Louis R. Ehrich; 1 copy of news article from The Republican, “Speech of Chairman Ehrich at the Third Party Conference” (pasted on cardboard sheets.)

  • Thumbnail for Paploulas, Leona
    Paploulas, Leona by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Leona was born in Greece, coming to America in 1913 when she was eight years old. She talks about: Ellis Island ; sheep herding with her husband, John; trailing sheep; cooking and rearing children; hauling water for washing; limited access to church services; other Greek families in the area; good medical care; good health; the death of one of her daughters and husband.

  • Thumbnail for Woman’s Relief Corps - Stella Kyle, Ella Dwinell & Irene de Toliver
    Woman’s Relief Corps - Stella Kyle, Ella Dwinell & Irene de Toliver by Toliver, Irene de , Dwinell, Ella , Kyle, Stella

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 47, Woman’s Relief Corps - Stella Kyle, Ella Dwinell & Irene de Toliver include: 1 8-page, handwritten letter, dated August 4, 1901, on Woman’s Relief Corps letterhead, describing the organization above, signed by Stella A. Kyle, Dept. Press Correspondent, WRC, Colo. & Wyo.; 1 4-page, handwritten addendum to letter above, giving biographical information on Stella Kyle and listing past presidents, secretaries and treasurers of the regional organization; 1 7-page, handwritten letter, dated July 28, 1901, on local Relief Corps letterhead, addressed to the Patriotic and loyal women of Colorado Springs, Colorado, in the year of our Lord 2001.” Signed by Ella S. L. Dwinell, Past Department President, etc.; 1 3-page addendum to letter above, giving biographical information on Ella Dwinell and listing past and current charter members of Auxiliary No. 4 of the Woman’s Relief Corps; 1 4-page, handwritten list of current membership of Woman’s Relief Corps No. 4, dated July 30, 1901, signed by Irene De Toliver, Corps Treasurer; 1 reprint of b&w photo of Ella Dwinell with printed copies of reports; 1 reprint of b&w photo of H. O. Dodge, Department Commander; 1 business card “Mrs. E. L. C. Dwinell, Agent, Colorado Springs, Colo.” (Mechanics Insurance Co. of Philadelphia); 1 printed newsletter of the Woman’s Relief Corps, dated July 22, 1901;;1 copy of the National Standard, Thursday, July 25, 1901, Denver, Colo.

  • Thumbnail for Franklin and Dora Noxon family (Christian Scientist)
    Franklin and Dora Noxon family (Christian Scientist) by Noxon, Dora Fletcher , Noxon, Franklin Foster

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 37, Franklin and Dora Noxon family (Christian Scientist) include: 1 13-page, handwritten article “Metaphysics - True and False,” by Dora Fletcher Noxon; 1 10-page, handwritten letter, dated August 3, 1901, addressed “To my own posterity and the Noxon family - one hundred years hence, and beyond.” Signed by Franklin Noxon; 2 b&w photos: “Dora Fletcher Noxon, Franklin Foster Noxon” “F. Foster Noxon, 12 and ½ years of age”; 1 7-page, handwritten letter, dated August 3, 1901, signed by Dora Noxon.

  • Thumbnail for Blanche Seaman Brown Sprague
    Blanche Seaman Brown Sprague by Sprague, Blanche S. B.

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 81, Blanche Seaman Brown Sprague include: 1 b&w photo “Blanche Seaman Brown Sprague”; 1 framed b&w photo of above; 1 b&w photo “Sitting-Room, Blanche S. B. Sprague”; 1 2-page, handwritten note, dated August 5, 1901, addressed to “any descendants of Mrs. Blanche Seaman Brown Sprague,” signed Blanche Seaman Brown Sprague; 1 mother-of-pearl and painted silk fan, enclosed in a box from Tiffany & Co.

  • Thumbnail for William Edwin and Ida Wheaton Riddle family
    William Edwin and Ida Wheaton Riddle family by Riddle, Ida Wheaton , Riddle, William Edwin

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 73, William Edwin and Ida Wheaton Riddle family include: 1 8-page, handwritten letter, dated August 4, 1901, addressed “To My Dear Grand Children,” signed by Ida Wheaton Riddle; 4 b&w photos, “Wm Wheaton Riddle,” “Frank Harwood Riddle,” “W. E. Riddle,” “Ida Wheaton Riddle.”

  • Thumbnail for Mary Gilman Ahlers, wife of a Colorado College professor
    Mary Gilman Ahlers, wife of a Colorado College professor by Ahlers, Mary Gilman

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 15, Mary Gilman Ahlers, wife of a Colorado College professor include: 2 metal hairpins “worn by Mary Gilman Ahlers, for her oldest girl descendant”; 1 4-page, handwritten letter, dated August 4, 1901, addressed to “College Friends of the Next Century,” signed by Mary Gilman Ahlers; 1 b&w photo of Mrs. Ahlers; 1 envelope addressed “To the wife of a Professor in Colorado College in the year 2001.”

  • Thumbnail for Christian Scientists - Edson M. Cole
    Christian Scientists - Edson M. Cole by Cole, Edson M.

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 45, include: 1 8-page, handwritten letter, dated August 4, 1901, addressed “To Our Friends One-Hundred Yrs Hence, Ten Reasons Why Christian Science Will Be The Religion of Your Day.” Signed by Edson M. Cole; 1 business card, “Edson M. Cole, C. S.”

  • Thumbnail for Ben Griffith, Colorado College Class 1901
    Ben Griffith, Colorado College Class 1901 by Griffith, Ben

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 9, Ben Griffith, Colorado College Class 1901 include: 1 11-page, handwritten letter, addressed “To the male Students of Colorado College in 2001 A. D.:” signed by Ben Griffith, class of 1901.

  • Thumbnail for Fashions - Mrs. Henry McAllister, Jr.
    Fashions - Mrs. Henry McAllister, Jr. by McAllister, Phebe Ketcham

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 53, Fashions - Mrs. Henry McAllister, Jr. include: 1 8-page, handwritten letter, dated August 4, 1901, titled “Fashions of To-day,” signed by Phebe Ketcham McAllister; 1 printed program of the Anne Hathaway Shakespeare Club for the year 1901; 27 b&w photos, unidentified, illustrating women’s and children’s fashions; 6 b&w photos, all marked “Young ladies representing characters in ‘Cranford’ at a benefit entertainment”; 1 envelope containing representative fabric scraps, addressed “Fashions of Today. August 4, 1901. Mrs. Henry McAllister, Jr.”; 1 handwritten note acknowledging Giddings Bros. Dry Goods and Madame Fraser, Dressmaker for their contributions; 10 fashion plates, b&w and color.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado Springs today - Dr. Samuel Le Nord Caldwell
    Colorado Springs today - Dr. Samuel Le Nord Caldwell by Caldwell, Samuel Le Nord

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 52, Colorado Springs today - Dr. Samuel Le Nord Caldwell include: 1 b&w photo “Dr. Samuel Le Nord Caldwell” with family information; 16 uncancelled U. S. postage stamps in envelope; 15 uncancelled U. S. postage stamps in envelope; 5 articles cut from the Colorado Springs Gazette in envelope; 1 40-page, handwritten letter, dated July, 1901, addressed to “My dear Friends of the Twentyfirst Century,” signed by Samuel LeNord Caldwell, M. D.

  • Thumbnail for Housekeeping - Elizabeth Mellon Evans Solly
    Housekeeping - Elizabeth Mellon Evans Solly by Solly, Elizabeth Mellon Evans

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 39, Housekeeping - Elizabeth Mellon Evans Solly include: 1 6-page, handwritten letter, dated August 1, 1901, addressed to “My dear great-great-great grandchildren,” signed by Elizabeth Mellon Evans Solly; 1 b&w photo: “Elizabeth Mellon Evans Solly”; 1 calling card: “Mrs. S. Edwin Solly”; 1 envelope addressed “To the Housekeepers of the year 2000.”

  • Thumbnail for Consumption treatment - Dr. Charles Fox Gardiner
    Consumption treatment - Dr. Charles Fox Gardiner by Gardiner, Charles Fox, 1857-1947

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 62, Consumption treatment - Dr. Charles Fox Gardiner include: 1 printed chart “Illustrating Dr. Charles Fox Gardiner’s Paper on Light and Air in the Treatment of Consumption in Colorado.”; 1 printed page “Diet List for Pulmonary Invalids with Fair Digestion” by Dr. Gardiner; 1 printed copy of article “Light and Air in the Treatment of Consumption in Colorado” by Dr. Gardiner, reprinted from The Medical News, July 22, 1899; 1 printed copy of “the Dangers of Tubercular Infection and Their Partial Arrest by Climatic Influences” by Dr. Gardiner, reprinted from The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, February, 1898; 1 b&w photo “Charles Fox Gardiner, M. D., aged 40 years.”; 1 5-page, handwritten letter, dated August 3, 1901, addressed “To My Professional Brothers of the Year 2001” signed by Charles Fox Gardiner, including genealogical information on backside of last page.