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16 hits

  • Thumbnail for Tea Room image 1
    Tea Room image 1 by Seiji Suzuki

    The tearoom is a masterpiece of traditional Japanese architectural design and artisanship. It incorporates both formal shoin-style elements, based on the design of a study or library in a Buddhist temple, as well as the sukiya elements of a humble cottage.

  • Thumbnail for Tea Room image 3
    Tea Room image 3 by Seiji Suzuki

    The circular window of the tearoom is not designed for looking outward. It is kept shut so that guests focus inward and ultimately reflect on their own state of mind. Zen scrolls often depict the mind with a circle written in one brush stroke. The subdued light in a tearoom lends itself to contemplation. The tearoom is a fragile work of art. It requires considerable care and delicate handling. Heavy jewelry, watches and such are never worn in the tearoom, for they may scratch the wood or mats. Shoes are removed and feet should be covered. It is traditional in Japan to wear white socks. Hands are washed and clothing is clean so as not to harm the mats.

  • Thumbnail for Seated Karako
  • Thumbnail for Tea Room image 5 (detail) - tokonoma
    Tea Room image 5 (detail) - tokonoma by Seiji Suzuki

    The alcove, or tokonoma, is slightly elevated above the tearoom floor and may originally have been used to seat someone of high rank. In the medieval age, the alcove became a sacred space to display a scroll with calligraphy or a simple flower arrangement. In a formal tea gathering, the scroll offers a profound message upon which guests may meditate; the natural flower arrangement reflects the pure spirit of the host. The uneven and staggered cherrywood shelves in the tokonoma display porcelains from the Reeves Collection. In medieval Japan, the shelves often held writing implements and Buddhist scripture. A dove-shaped piece of wood curves upward at the end of the shelf. This traditional architectural detail prevents a writing brush from rolling off the shelf. The recessed hardware details in the cabinets are in the shape of a chrysanthemum.

  • Thumbnail for Blue and White Rice Table Set
    Blue and White Rice Table Set

    Blue and white rice table (rijsttafel) set for condiments to be eaten with rice. Chinese export for the Dutch market.

  • Thumbnail for Netsuke (bird catcher)
  • Thumbnail for Bamboo Tonkotsu + 12 coins
  • Thumbnail for Tea Room image 2 (detail)
    Tea Room image 2 (detail) by Seiji Suzuki

    The tearoom is a masterpiece of traditional Japanese architectural design and artisanship. It incorporates both formal shoin-style elements, based on the design of a study or library in a Buddhist temple, as well as the sukiya elements of a humble cottage. The circular window of the tearoom is not designed for looking outward. It is kept shut so that guests focus inward and ultimately reflect on their own state of mind. Zen scrolls often depict the mind with a circle written in one brush stroke. The subdued light in a tearoom lends itself to contemplation.

  • Thumbnail for Tea Room image 4 - tokonoma
    Tea Room image 4 - tokonoma by Seiji Suzuki

    The alcove, or tokonoma, is slightly elevated above the tearoom floor and may originally have been used to seat someone of high rank. In the medieval age, the alcove became a sacred space to display a scroll with calligraphy or a simple flower arrangement. In a formal tea gathering, the scroll offers a profound message upon which guests may meditate; the natural flower arrangement reflects the pure spirit of the host.

  • Thumbnail for Old Man Wearing a Cap
  • Thumbnail for Tea Room image 6 (tea sets)
    Tea Room image 6 (tea sets) by Seiji Suzuki

    A traditional "mizuya" or preparation room sits apart from the tearoom. Typically, the most honored guest sits closest to the alcove, but our tea room is designed in a configuration known as geza-doko, which allows visitors to enjoy a full view during a demonstration. The first guest sits closest to the outer-most edge of the tea room.

  • Thumbnail for Kikujido and gun lacquer, 3 case inro
  • Thumbnail for Three Pekinese pups in ivory with five section inro - back side
    Three Pekinese pups in ivory with five section inro - back side by Gyokushi

    Back side of Japanese lacquer inro case with ivory toggle in the form of three Pekinese puppies, climbing one on top of the other. The inro case is decorated with a hen and chick in gold and red lacquer pecking at the ground under a spray of bamboo.

  • Thumbnail for Three Pekinese pups in ivory with five-part inro case(side one)
    Three Pekinese pups in ivory with five-part inro case(side one) by Gyokushi

    Japanese lacquer inro case with ivory toggle in the form of three Pekinese puppies, climbing one on top of the other. The inro case is decorated with a hen and chick in gold and red lacquer pecking at the ground under a spray of bamboo.

  • Thumbnail for Drunkman, four case inro
  • Thumbnail for Chicken in an egg