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  • Thumbnail for The power of maps in the South China Sea
    The power of maps in the South China Sea by Ogi, Ryan Kiyoshi

    The power of maps have gone widely unnoticed in everyday life. How maps have created the realities that people conceive today are defined by maps and those who create them. However, through this thesis, the power of maps comes into question with the introduction of international entities and laws such as the United Nations and the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). This thesis goes to show how maps have lost this power in the South China Sea Dispute between China, Vietnam and the Philippines through an analysis of maps created by each country in comparison to the author's own maps based on an interpretation of UNCLOS. Also in the thesis, the author shows how the Philippines, through his own interpretation of international law and analysis, have a claim in the South China Sea Dispute that is stronger than the others based on his interpretations of UNCLOS.

  • Thumbnail for Limepot
    Limepot

    Stoneware, H: 5 1/2" x Dia: 4". Glazed wares (wood-ash glazed) were first produced in Southeast Asia in Vietnam during the first century; the technique was undoubtedly a legacy of the Chinese, who ruled Vietnam from 111 BCE to 979 CE. Vietnamese ceramics relate to Chinese ceramics in terms of glazes, shapes, but differences in the clay body (Vietnamese wares have a white clay body), decoration, and the fact the Vietnamese produced only stoneware, set them apart. This limepot is an example of a unique shape that is not found in Chinese wares, but instead points to a distinctly Southeast Asian usage. Certain cultural traits set the region of Southeast Asia apart from Chinese or Indian cultures. These traits include betel chewing, cockfighting, houses on stilts, piston bellows, musical pattern dominated by gongs, similar patterns of body decoration, the concept of spirit or soul stuff, and the prominence of women in descent, ritual matters, market and agriculture. Betel chewing involves creating a quid by wrapping slaked lime and cut areca nuts in a betel leaf; the effect is that of a mild aphrodisiac. Limepots of this type were created in all sizes and in a variety of glazes. As in this example, the handle is interpreted to look like a vine that ends in leaves, often of the areca plant.

  • Thumbnail for Limepot - bottom view
    Limepot - bottom view

    Stoneware, H: 5 1/2" x Dia: 4". Glazed wares (wood-ash glazed) were first produced in Southeast Asia in Vietnam during the first century; the technique was undoubtedly a legacy of the Chinese, who ruled Vietnam from 111 BCE to 979 CE. Vietnamese ceramics relate to Chinese ceramics in terms of glazes, shapes, but differences in the clay body (Vietnamese wares have a white clay body), decoration, and the fact the Vietnamese produced only stoneware, set them apart. This limepot is an example of a unique shape that is not found in Chinese wares, but instead points to a distinctly Southeast Asian usage. Certain cultural traits set the region of Southeast Asia apart from Chinese or Indian cultures. These traits include betel chewing, cockfighting, houses on stilts, piston bellows, musical pattern dominated by gongs, similar patterns of body decoration, the concept of spirit or soul stuff, and the prominence of women in descent, ritual matters, market and agriculture. Betel chewing involves creating a quid by wrapping slaked lime and cut areca nuts in a betel leaf; the effect is that of a mild aphrodisiac. Limepots of this type were created in all sizes and in a variety of glazes. As in this example, the handle is interpreted to look like a vine that ends in leaves, often of the areca plant.

  • Thumbnail for Museum at My Lai, Vietnam, interior
    Museum at My Lai, Vietnam, interior

    View of the second floor interior of the museum at the Son My Vestige Area. The museum houses a combination of photographs and artifacts from the massacre site of My Lai.

  • Thumbnail for Museum at My Lai, Vietnam
    Museum at My Lai, Vietnam

    View of the museum from just inside the gates of the Son My Vestige Area, better known to the world as the site of the 1968 My Lai massacre. Newly remodeled, the museum houses artifacts and photographs related to the US build up in the area, the post-Vietnam War era as well as the massacre itself.