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  • Thumbnail for Red-Carpet Treatment
    Red-Carpet Treatment

    Global transportation, instructive tours, and lavish entertainment were provided to make welcome in 1860 the first envoys to the United States. The group picture of the ambassadors was taken at a naval shipbuilding yard in Washington, D.C.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese garden - view two
    Japanese garden - view two

    Garden designed by Arthur Shurtleff; originally included a pagoda, bridge, pond and working replica of Mount Fujiyama, of which remnants are preserved. Part of the Lasher estate which formed the southern half of the Fairfield campus in 1942. The Lasher garden is likely a unique element within the Asian Art in the Undergraduate Curriculum project; it lends itself to inclusion in the project not only for this singularity but because it exemplifies fascinating questions and issues. This is a 'Japanese garden' designed by an American landscape architect for an American client in the late 1920s; it is situated adjacent to what was the Lasher house and is now Bellarmine Hall, the location of the President's Office and the Office of Admissions. It included, as the information provided indicates, a 'working' replica of Mt. Fuji--that is, Mr. Lasher could entertain guests by an 'eruption' of the volcano. In the years since the Lashers' residence there and the recent present the garden was neglected to the extent that it is difficult to make out some of its original features. Other elements of the original garden are also lost, decayed, or neglected, but many of its features remain, including footpaths, bridges, lanterns, and of course plantings, and in the last few years plans have been undertaken to restore the garden. The existence of old lantern slides of the garden--which should be considered an important part of the Asian collection, as such objects are artifacts in their own right--permits at least a partial understanding of the original appearance; drawings by the architect (again, this could be considered part of the Asian collection) are also important in this respect. Among those involved in the restoration is a Fairfield resident who is currently a student of architecture at Syracuse. The desire to implement a plan seems to be shared by various constituents around the campus, and while funds are central to how, when and if this will occur, enthusiasm for the project indicates it is likely to be completed. The restored garden could serve faculty, students, administrators, and visitors not only as a pleasant refuge but also as a resource for teaching and learning. As the entrance to Bellarmine is gradually restored and its sense as a grand entrance enhanced, the role of the garden--situated just adjacent to the entrance--can also grow. Furthermore, as the Museum planned for Bellarmine is put in place, the garden will become more prominent, as one will walk along it in order to reach the museum entrance.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese garden
    Japanese garden

    Garden designed by Arthur Shurtleff;originally included a pagoda, bridge, pond and working replica of Mount Fujiyama, of which remnants are preserved. Part of the Lasher estate which formed the southern half of the Fairfield campus in 1942. The Lasher garden is likely a unique element within the Asian Art in the Undergraduate Curriculum project; it lends itself to inclusion in the project not only for this singularity but because it exemplifies fascinating questions and issues. This is a 'Japanese garden' designed by an American landscape architect for an American client in the late 1920s; it is situated adjacent to what was the Lasher house and is now Bellarmine Hall, the location of the President's Office and the Office of Admissions. It included, as the information provided indicates, a 'working' replica of Mt. Fuji--that is, Mr. Lasher could entertain guests by an 'eruption' of the volcano. In the years since the Lashers' residence there and the recent present the garden was neglected to the extent that it is difficult to make out some of its original features. Other elements of the original garden are also lost, decayed, or neglected, but many of its features remain, including footpaths, bridges, lanterns, and of course plantings, and in the last few years plans have been undertaken to restore the garden. The existence of old lantern slides of the garden--which should be considered an important part of the Asian collection, as such objects are artifacts in their own right--permits at least a partial understanding of the original appearance; drawings by the architect (again, this could be considered part of the Asian collection) are also important in this respect. Among those involved in the restoration is a Fairfield resident who is currently a student of architecture at Syracuse. The desire to implement a plan seems to be shared by various constituents around the campus, and while funds are central to how, when and if this will occur, enthusiasm for the project indicates it is likely to be completed. The restored garden could serve faculty, students, administrators, and visitors not only as a pleasant refuge but also as a resource for teaching and learning. As the entrance to Bellarmine is gradually restored and its sense as a grand entrance enhanced, the role of the garden--situated just adjacent to the entrance--can also grow. Furthermore, as the Museum planned for Bellarmine is put in place, the garden will become more prominent, as one will walk along it in order to reach the museum entrance. This unique site has great potential for the Fairfield program.