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  • Thumbnail for Baby bump : for expecting mothers and their loved ones [2013-2014 Block 6]
    Baby bump : for expecting mothers and their loved ones [2013-2014 Block 6] by Clark, Paige , Jans, Petra

    A magazine created by Colorado College students as part of the course, FG200 Introduction to Feminist Thought, taught by Assistant Professor Heidi Lewis during Block 6, 2014.

  • Thumbnail for The American hero through the twentieth century
    The American hero through the twentieth century by Washburn, Victoria Brezze

    The American image of the hero underwent a paradigmatic shift in the twentieth century. This thesis examines the traditional model of the hero, why there has been a move away from that model, and the replacement archetypes we currently see today.

  • Thumbnail for On the threshold : the liminality of Asian Americaness in American cinema
    On the threshold : the liminality of Asian Americaness in American cinema by Kanemori, Taylor Marie

    An analysis of Asian roles in American cinema revealed a complex portrayal of Asian Americans liminality. Seventeen films derived from “Asian American Film 101” (2011) a list created by Michael Kang were used to conduct this research. The literature concluded there were limited spaces for Asians in Hollywood: women shown as hypersexual and men a meek and asexual. Using content analysis from these seventeen significant Asian American Oscar nominated films, the research showed the presentation of Asian Americaness in a state of transition. These films showed the Western perception of a liminal state between their Asianess and their Americaness.

  • Thumbnail for Tea Room image 6 (tea sets)
    Tea Room image 6 (tea sets) by Seiji Suzuki

    A traditional "mizuya" or preparation room sits apart from the tearoom. Typically, the most honored guest sits closest to the alcove, but our tea room is designed in a configuration known as geza-doko, which allows visitors to enjoy a full view during a demonstration. The first guest sits closest to the outer-most edge of the tea room.

  • Thumbnail for Indicators of childhood obesity : battling an epidemic
    Indicators of childhood obesity : battling an epidemic by Cooke, Christopher Mathew

    From 1980 to 2008 childhood obesity rates have almost tripled for children aged 6-11 and have more than tripled for adolescents aged 12-19. This epidemic of obesity as shown no signs of slowing down in the future. This information paired with an almost 1000% increase in fast food sales from 1975 to 2009 paints a grim future for our nation's health. Since obesity has been concretely linked to health problems such as diabetes and certain types of cancer, it is a responsibility of our nation to diagnose and cure the disease that is claiming so many lives, whether directly or indirectly. It is for these reasons that this paper attempts to discover the indicators of childhood obesity. The results of this paper are that prevalence of fast food restaurants and excessive time spent in front of a screen are major indicators of childhood obesity. Another major indicator is meals eaten as a family per week, which is a proxy variable for parental supervision. Hopefully this information will lead to further regulation of the fast food industry and its children-targetted advertising sectors.

  • Thumbnail for Education and the Bismarck model : improving longevity and reducing healthcare costs in the United States
    Education and the Bismarck model : improving longevity and reducing healthcare costs in the United States by Collins, Hayden J.

    This thesis analyzes the relationship between societal wellbeing and life expectancy from an international sample. The United States has a significantly lower life expectancy at birth than other wealthy, foreign democracies. This paper evaluates the significance of a multitude of diverse variables, such as obesity, education, alcohol consumption, and purchasing power (collectively referred to societal wellbeing), in explaining the variance of life expectancy at birth from an international sample. The data covers societal wellbeing indicators of the international sample from 1980-2009. An OLS regression is used to determine the importance of each variable in explaining the variance of life expectancy. Foreign healthcare models that effectively address these nonmedical determinants of longevity will be used to suggest policy for healthcare reform in the United States. Healthcare reform is an incredibly intricate topic that can be approached from a variety of methods. How does societal wellbeing affect longevity? What are the sources of variance between other countries and the United States? How can these variances be used to prescribe policy for healthcare reform in the U.S.? These questions are integral to addressing the topic of healthcare reform and demonstrate the importance of international collaboration to improve the health of our nations’ population.

  • Thumbnail for Undergraduate education and future annual salary
    Undergraduate education and future annual salary by Gerken, John

    Rising tuition in the United States is causing parents to become increasingly concerned with where their children should attend college. A liberal arts education is considered by many to be one of the best undergraduate educations money can buy. However, much scrutiny has arisen concerning whether more selective liberal arts college graduates receive higher future annual salaries when compared to less selective undergraduate college and university graduates. I hypothesize that liberal arts graduates will receive greater future annual salaries than non-liberal arts private and public college and university graduates. To test my hypothesis, I use data from the 2003 Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study, which is a third follow-up of a national sample of students who completed their bachelor degrees at the end of the 1992-1993 academic year.

  • Thumbnail for Why are working women opting out? : Are they happy?
    Why are working women opting out? : Are they happy? by Chavez, Alejandra

    This paper identifies factors that contribute to the decision by some married American women to “opt-out” of the labor market. Interestingly, many of these women have invested heavily in their education and have opportunities for career advancement. The “opting-out” phenomenon illustrates women who leave high-profile jobs to seek flexible work arrangements (e.g., part-time jobs) or to be stay-at-home mothers to balance work and family. Opting out is embedded in debates about traditional gender roles, wage penalty, and the loss of valuable human capital for the economy—highly educated mothers. Data for this study come from the 2012 American Time Use Survey (ATUS). This study uses Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) to evaluate the factors that influence the number of hours women work a week. It also uses logistic regression to assess if the effect of spouses’ work status holds after controlling for age, race, region, women’s education, work sector, occupation, household income, number of children, children under five, and time spent on childcare. Furthermore, this study evaluates the different time usage of parents and applies existent household utility maximization models to show the effect of women’s decision to opt out. This study found that while spouses’ works status is a significant contributor to women’s decision to opt out, there are other factors that are stronger predictors. This study also found that married mothers have a strong preference for housework and childcare, which leaves them with less leisure time compared to fathers. Ultimately, this study sheds light on the way a household maximizes its utility based on the division of labor agreed by the couple, which in turn influences labor supply.

  • Thumbnail for Ski resort marketing in the United States
    Ski resort marketing in the United States by Webb, Derrick Scott

    Marketing strategies have changed over the last few decades and are still changing. Marketing managers need to realize these changes in marketing strategies and use them effectively to market to the changing demographic of skiers. Skiers are getting older and the numbers of advanced skiers is increasing, but as they get older more and more of the baby boomer generation is exiting the sport there needs to be a strong effort to encourage younger and newer participants to avidly pursue the sport and more importantly start them at your resort and keep them as lifelong participants. The purpose of this thesis is to research different marketing strategies and campaigns so that resort marketers can determine where and how to allocate them. In addition it will determine which marketable expenditures positively affect skier visits.

  • Thumbnail for Sarbanes-Oxley and privatization frequency in America
    Sarbanes-Oxley and privatization frequency in America by Steveson, Patrick Taylor

    The quality of financial records is a topic of constant debate, even more so during times of recession. The United States faced a banking crisis in 2002, which rocked the very foundations of the business sector. Sarbanes-Oxley passed in response to the banking crisis, implementing a series of new standards applying to all U.S. public company executives, and firms as a whole. Consequences for fraudulent activity have evolved to be more severe, and external auditors have become more autonomous. This thesis analyzes the frequency of firms going-private in the United States. Going private transactions were collected from January 1, 2007 to February 5, 2014, in order to further investigate the behavior of the privatization trend in America. The study concluded that there was a decline in the overall number of firms going private, in addition to a change in the industries witnessing the highest frequency of privatization. Furthermore, the FEI surveys concluded that compliance costs have declined over the years following the passage of SOX. These declines support that SOX may no longer be driving firms to privatization as compliance no longer implies as significant of a financial burden.

  • Thumbnail for Brand assets and market value : the economic relevance of trademark portfolios
    Brand assets and market value : the economic relevance of trademark portfolios by Vallely, Sam

    This paper uses a novel dataset of trademark activity for U.S. apparel firms to examine the economic relevance of trademarks to firm market value. Trademarks are the legal representations of a firm’s brands and, as brand assets, have the ability to improve firms’ market position and influence consumer purchase behavior. However, our understanding of the role trademarks play in firms’ valuations in financial markets is limited. This study finds that firms’ trademark portfolios are value relevant to market participants, and carries important implications for corporate IP policies and practices.

  • Thumbnail for Greener grass : addressing geographic and economic factors of happiness in the United States
    Greener grass : addressing geographic and economic factors of happiness in the United States by Nelson, Lauren

    Over the past half century, the world experienced incredible and unprecedented economic growth without a proportional increase in individual life satisfaction and happiness. Despite high GDP and levels of personal and household incomes, the United States falls short of many human development indicators. This paper seeks to address the geographic and economic factors of happiness within the United States using the Centers for Disease Control’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS). Models use two dependent variables, life satisfaction and mental health, as proxies for happiness. Geography is statistically relevant with defined variation across the country. Personal income is important for overall life satisfaction but has little effect on mental health. Most interestingly, states with higher per capita economic growth also have better mental health.

  • Thumbnail for D05 Cree Indians, N.W. Territory
  • Thumbnail for Conserving biodiversity : a qualitative method for analyzing federal environmental policies in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem
    Conserving biodiversity : a qualitative method for analyzing federal environmental policies in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem by Williams, Samuel Parker

    Biological diversity includes the variance in genes, organisms, and relationships found in nature. Also called biodiversity, it provides countless economic, social, and personal benefits to people in the United States and all over the world. In the U.S., this is recognized by the federal government most explicitly in the Endangered Species Act’s protections for those flora and fauna whose survival is least likely and most endangered by human action. Unfortunately, there are many anthropogenic threats to biological diversity. In order to protect this incredible natural resource, responsible management must be implemented across all levels of government. Given the amount of funding, large spatial scales, and public interest at stake, the federal government is the best suited to this task. The federal government must play a key role in the protection of biological diversity. The purpose of this paper is to provide a qualitative analysis of the federal government’s management of biological diversity in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Examining management at these scales is uncommon, yet extremely valuable. By examining management on scales that coincide with the scale of natural processes, we can better see the broad implications and interactions of our management policies. We can also determine how to sharpen management in order to more accurately address these important scales. In order to achieve this, a basic overview of modern conservation science and terms to be utilized will be provided. Building upon this overview, four categories will be describe, which, according to the science, are vital to the preservation of biological diversity. These categories are cores, connectivity, restoration, and monitoring. There will be three standards used to assess the quality of policy. Scientific foundations, the human-nature nexus, and adaptability are these three measures. The Greater Yellowstone ecosystem will then be described. Finally, in each of the four categories, examples of policy or management action will be described and analyzed via the three measures of successful policy. This analysis shall provide examples of policies with varying degrees of success. By extrapolating management from these representative case studies, an aggregate picture of management across the ecosystem will be gained. It is hoped that such analysis will uncover areas where management may be improved and facilitate the spread of successful policies and management ideas. It is also intended as a suitable framework for examining and creating biodiversity management policies in other ecosystems, regions, and countries.

  • Thumbnail for Knockout [2013-2014 v. 1 no. 1 March]
    Knockout [2013-2014 v. 1 no. 1 March] by Banks, Christopher , Crook, Samantha

    A magazine created by Colorado College students as part of the course, FG200 Introduction to Feminist Thought, taught by Assistant Professor Heidi Lewis during Block 6, 2014.

  • Thumbnail for Who built it? an analysis of American exceptionalism in contemporary politics
    Who built it? an analysis of American exceptionalism in contemporary politics by Wallace, Amanda Jean

    Shortly after becoming President of the United States in 2009, Barack Obama was asked by a reporter in Strasbourg, France whether or not he adhered to a philosophy of American exceptionalism. The reporter intended to mean whether Obama believed the United States is uniquely qualified to lead the world. The President began his response with the following: “I believe in American exceptionalism, just as I suspect that the Brits believe in British exceptionalism and the Greeks believe in Greek exceptionalism.” A year later, Governor of Massachusetts Mitt Romney wrote a book where he alleges this response proves President Obama “doesn't believe [American exceptionalism] at all” and criticized him for that stance. Furthermore, President Obama's response was brought up again during the 2012 election when Governor Romney challenged him for the Presidency. Even though the quote above is only the beginning of his entire reply, the entire exchange highlights the role American exceptionalism still plays in the political sphere. My essay emphasizes three important questions: the definition of American exceptionalism, its previous and current role in politics, and assessments of its validity from both advocates and critics.

  • Thumbnail for Prevalence of male perpetrated domestic violence in the presence of traditional masculine values and hegemonic masculinity
    Prevalence of male perpetrated domestic violence in the presence of traditional masculine values and hegemonic masculinity by Marien, Colette Alyse

    Rates of domestic violence remain high in America despite many actions being taken against it. Though both men and women can be perpetrators of domestic violence, most often domestic violence is committed by men against women. Previous studies on the topic find that traditional masculine values and masculine gender role stress increase the likeliness of a man committing violence, and that gender role stress is higher in men who experience a form of masculinity marginalized from the hegemonic masculine ideal. In the present study I examine the effect that both traditional masculine values and hegemonic masculinity has on prevalence of male perpetrated domestic violence. I use six of the nine U.S. Census regions to carry out the study. By finding the average score or level of traditional masculine values, hegemonic masculinity, and prevalence of male perpetration in each of the six regions, I was able to observe the effect had on prevalence of male perpetration when traditional masculine values and hegemonic masculinity are present in the region. The goal was to find out if stronger traditional masculine values and lower access to the hegemonic masculine ideal in a region would lead to higher rates of male perpetrated domestic violence in that region. The results support both the previous findings and hypothesis, and also highlight the lowering effect that hegemonic masculinity has on rates of male perpetrated domestic violence.

  • Thumbnail for "A self-discovery adventure" : the influence of American wilderness on Hmong refugee identity formation
    "A self-discovery adventure" : the influence of American wilderness on Hmong refugee identity formation by Hedlund, Rachel

    Although there is an emerging body of literature on ethnic groups and natural resource use in America, there is not much research regarding specific ethnic groups and their interactions with the American wilderness. This thesis explores the relationship between the American social constructions of wilderness and a specific refugee population in America—the Hmong people. Interviews were conducted with participants in the Twin Cities of Minnesota with conversations focusing on identity and wilderness interactions. These interviews revealed that the Hmong, a Southeast Asian people with a deeply rooted connection to nature interact with the wilderness in ways that differ from the American norm. Yet, through segmented assimilation, younger generations of Hmong have also acculturated to the American perception of wilderness as a place of self-discovery.

  • Thumbnail for A short ladder of mobility : entrapping undocumented workers in unfair working conditions
    A short ladder of mobility : entrapping undocumented workers in unfair working conditions by Bamba, Aurora-Marie Venzor

    The current treatment of undocumented immigrants in the United States traps undocumented immigrants into the secondary sector. This leaves people who are undocumented in positions for potential exploitation in the workplace. This study explores the treatment of undocumented workers in the restaurant industry. It uses qualitative methods analyze in-depth interviews. There were thirteen participants in total, all except one identified as Latino. One very special attribute about all of the participants is they have all chosen to permanently settle in the United States. Most of the findings have already been noted in the literature such as low wages, hour violations, and unsafe working conditions. Adding to the literature, one important finding is status preservation of co-ethnics or/and status of preservation of legality, this is where supervisors who have the same ethnicity or status treat workers worst than their American counter parts. Furthermore, another important finding was the slow maturation of exploitation consciousness. Young people in my thesis were not fully aware of the exploitation they were receiving while undocumented. Through these findings above the purpose was to present a clear story on how undocumented people have no mobility and are static in working low-level jobs.

  • Thumbnail for (Un)holy bodies : the radical interruption of C. Everett Koop’s Evangelical Christianity in the discourse of AIDS
    (Un)holy bodies : the radical interruption of C. Everett Koop’s Evangelical Christianity in the discourse of AIDS by Milliken, Tara Sophia

    In the 1980s, the appearance of AIDS in urban centers of the United States unleashed a strong, and often condemnatory reaction from outspoken conservative Christians. With their digital and human networks, the fundamentalists used biblical and medieval rhetoric that stressed the intersection of sin and disease to enforce the idea that AIDS was a divine retribution for the behavior of gay men. Founded on premillennialism, biblical infallibility and the protestant sense of purpose, fundamentalists view America as sacred, susceptible and in rapid decline. In part because of these factors, fundamentalism has been inclined to create narratives of immanent demise to explain historical events. Their messages on AIDS were powerful and tapped into preexisting cultural anxieties around sex, illness and death. Unlike the trajectory of other diseases that had been interpreted as religion to promote the notion of sin, the fundamentalist construction of AIDS was countered by C. Everett Koop, the surgeon general of the United States, who followed his evangelical faith and used his position of power to change the course of the illness’ presence in America. By shifting the focus from asking why to saving lives, C. Everett Koop’s radical faith-based action began to re-write the cultural perception of AIDS. In this process, Koop stayed true to his two faiths, medicine and evangelical Christianity, and proceeded to discredit centuries of moralizing on illness as divine retribution. His disruption created the necessary foundation for serious action being taken to resolve the AIDS crisis. In providing factual information about the disease, allowed space for more moderate religious bodies and secular movements, such as ACT UP, to enter the public discourse, humanize the sick, and call America to action on finding a cure for AIDS.

  • Thumbnail for Moving away from Marx
    Moving away from Marx

    Illustration from the cover of TIME; photo of Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping in the middle of a three-panel folding screen, who is presiding over the transition from an agricultural socialist state to a new one marked by hamburgers, cameras, Nike shoes, high-rises and blue jeans.

  • Thumbnail for Red China's Chou Enlai
    Red China's Chou Enlai

    Cover of TIME magazine-- May 10, 1954; a smiling Chou Enlai is backed up by a blood-smeared dragon trying to break out from behind the "Bamboo Curtain."

  • Thumbnail for Tea Room image 3
    Tea Room image 3 by Seiji Suzuki

    The circular window of the tearoom is not designed for looking outward. It is kept shut so that guests focus inward and ultimately reflect on their own state of mind. Zen scrolls often depict the mind with a circle written in one brush stroke. The subdued light in a tearoom lends itself to contemplation. The tearoom is a fragile work of art. It requires considerable care and delicate handling. Heavy jewelry, watches and such are never worn in the tearoom, for they may scratch the wood or mats. Shoes are removed and feet should be covered. It is traditional in Japan to wear white socks. Hands are washed and clothing is clean so as not to harm the mats.

  • Thumbnail for Tea Room image 1
    Tea Room image 1 by Seiji Suzuki

    The tearoom is a masterpiece of traditional Japanese architectural design and artisanship. It incorporates both formal shoin-style elements, based on the design of a study or library in a Buddhist temple, as well as the sukiya elements of a humble cottage.

  • Thumbnail for Socioeconomic disparities in youth obesity : an application of the household health production theory
    Socioeconomic disparities in youth obesity : an application of the household health production theory by Lowenstein, Christopher A.

    Existing literature indicates an undeniable link between socioeconomic status and adult obesity prevalence across the United States; the youth obesity epidemic is no exception to this trend. This study addresses potential demographic, socioeconomic and built environmental factors that may explain the mechanisms behind the observed inequalities in childhood and adolescent obesity. Using youth survey data from the western United States and various econometric techniques, the theory of household production of health is applied to help identify avenues through which these variables may impact children’s weight status. The results from this study support the consensus drawn from previous studies: food consumption and physical activity decisions are likely determined by a variety of household economic constraints which limit resources or access to resources necessary for the maintenance of a healthy lifestyle.