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  • Thumbnail for D05 Cree Indians, N.W. Territory
  • Thumbnail for Baby bump : for expecting mothers and their loved ones [2013-2014 Block 6]
    Baby bump : for expecting mothers and their loved ones [2013-2014 Block 6] by Jans, Petra , Clark, Paige

    A magazine created by Colorado College students as part of the course, FG200 Introduction to Feminist Thought, taught by Assistant Professor Heidi Lewis during Block 6, 2014.

  • Thumbnail for Tea Room image 3
    Tea Room image 3 by Seiji Suzuki

    The circular window of the tearoom is not designed for looking outward. It is kept shut so that guests focus inward and ultimately reflect on their own state of mind. Zen scrolls often depict the mind with a circle written in one brush stroke. The subdued light in a tearoom lends itself to contemplation. The tearoom is a fragile work of art. It requires considerable care and delicate handling. Heavy jewelry, watches and such are never worn in the tearoom, for they may scratch the wood or mats. Shoes are removed and feet should be covered. It is traditional in Japan to wear white socks. Hands are washed and clothing is clean so as not to harm the mats.

  • Thumbnail for Chicana/o language, culture, and history : identity construction and self-representation of Mexican-Americans
    Chicana/o language, culture, and history : identity construction and self-representation of Mexican-Americans by Steeler, Elizabeth

    The following research concerning Chicana/o identity formation and self-representation was conducted at The Colorado College throughout November and December of 2011, and January and February of 2012. Not only are established theories on identity and culture utilized but research case studies and other ethnographies on the subject of Chicana/o language and culture are also examined in the following project. Along with this review of existing frameworks I examine Chicana/o culture and language through the analysis of various works of Chicana/o literature. Using these assorted resources, I show how Chicana/o language, culture, and history give structure to the identities of Mexican-Americans living in the United States. Research on this specific topic is important because immigration from Mexico is on the forefront of the political arena in the United States. The prevalence of Mexican-Americans living in the United States is encouraging important changes in economic and institutional policies. In order to make these changes, there must be knowledge of the Chicana/o language, culture, and history. How these concepts shape the identities of Mexican Americans is integral in understanding the specific policies that have been, and will continue to affect Chicanas/os all over the United States. My research will help bring this information into the public and academic spheres as well as demonstrate the roles that language, culture, and history play in shaping identity and creating a representation of oneself.

  • Thumbnail for A quantitative analysis of quality of emergency room care
    A quantitative analysis of quality of emergency room care by Tukan, Andrea

    The United States healthcare industry is in need of reform to address the high financial cost of medical care, the dwindling health of the population, and the disorganization, complexity, and high cost of insurance. These healthcare inefficiencies and barriers to treatment create patient quality of care issues. Emergency medicine is a growing sector of healthcare, and this thesis examines how the macro level issues of the healthcare industry effect and relate to patient quality of care in the emergency room. Demographic and patient registration individual patient data was used to quantitatively examine the care received in the emergency room, finding that barriers to quality of emergency medical care more commonly lie in preexisting health issues or socioeconomic factors unrelated to the medical care actually received in the emergency room.

  • Thumbnail for The effect of education expenditures on income inequality
    The effect of education expenditures on income inequality by Lynch, Michael Francis

    Income inequality has steadily increased in the United States since the census bureau began officially accounting for it in 1967. Over thirty-percent of American income has been concentrated with the top 5% of income earners since 1976. This study examines the notion that education expenditures have an equalizing effect on income inequality. Based on a panel dataset of fifty states over twenty years from 1986-2005, this research examines the effect of total current education expenditures and sector specific expenditures on the Gini-coefficient. A fixed effects regression model, applied with lagged expenditure data, shows that education only reduces income inequality in the long-run.

  • Thumbnail for The effects of calorie consumption and calorie expenditure on obesity rates in the United States
    The effects of calorie consumption and calorie expenditure on obesity rates in the United States by Mushlin, Rachel Naomi

    Obesity rates in the United States have increased dramatically since the 1970s. This paper examines the effect of calorie consumption and caloric expenditure on obesity rates for both individuals who report that they are trying to lose weight and individuals who report that they are not trying to lose weight. This study uses Ordinary Least Square (OLS) Regressions for both of these groups, and finds that the results are generally consistent with the existing literature.

  • Thumbnail for Climate policy impacts : an endogenous optimization model and the regional greenhouse gas initiative
    Climate policy impacts : an endogenous optimization model and the regional greenhouse gas initiative by Rosenquist, Jaclyn

    With the growing concern about climate change, integrated impact assessment models (IAMs) have been developed to assess climate mitigation policies. Previous attempts to endogenize technology into regional climate policy models have assumed learning-by-doing or include a single energy sector. This study corrects for the previous limitations in a regional model of the United States and the rest of the world. A backstop technology and knowledge spillovers are added to the model to improve the model’s capacity to simulate a real policy. Each specification is then simulated under no policy (business as usual), an optimal policy, and restrictions of emissions back to 1995 levels. Since the United States has refused to ratify the Kyoto Protocol, it is particularly important to evaluate climate policies specific to the United States, like the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI). This study also aims to evaluate the effectiveness the RGGI by modeling permit-funded R&D in the energy sector.

  • Thumbnail for Determinants of labor force participation by Southeast Asian immigrants
    Determinants of labor force participation by Southeast Asian immigrants by Vasan, Thamanna

    This thesis analyzes the determinants that influence Southeast Asian immigrant labor force participation. In this analysis variables regarding human capital, time allocation and assimilation are used in a probit model. These variables include educational attainment, family income, citizenship status, marital status, family structure characteristics, age, sex, and others. Findings suggest that sex, age, citizenship status and family structure (having more than one family in a household, being married and being linguistically isolated) have a greater impact on labor force participation than traits such as educational attainment or the ethnic enclave effect.

  • Thumbnail for Greener grass : addressing geographic and economic factors of happiness in the United States
    Greener grass : addressing geographic and economic factors of happiness in the United States by Nelson, Lauren

    Over the past half century, the world experienced incredible and unprecedented economic growth without a proportional increase in individual life satisfaction and happiness. Despite high GDP and levels of personal and household incomes, the United States falls short of many human development indicators. This paper seeks to address the geographic and economic factors of happiness within the United States using the Centers for Disease Control’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS). Models use two dependent variables, life satisfaction and mental health, as proxies for happiness. Geography is statistically relevant with defined variation across the country. Personal income is important for overall life satisfaction but has little effect on mental health. Most interestingly, states with higher per capita economic growth also have better mental health.

  • Thumbnail for “Book ’em Danno!” Environmental liability disclosure in a post Sarbanes-Oxley environment
    “Book ’em Danno!” Environmental liability disclosure in a post Sarbanes-Oxley environment by Spears, Sarah R.

    Despite increasing legal and social pressure to reduce environmental impact, many corporations continue environmentally damaging industrial practices. This study seeks to understand the impact of accounting policies articulated in the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX) by studying changes in the PERI Toxic 100 Air Polluters index, pre and post SOX. Results suggest that full recognition of environmental liabilities in corporate financial statements has not increased since 2002, but important differences between companies showing improved environmental impact and those who have yet to implement changes are elucidated.

  • Thumbnail for A new approach to acquiring energy savings : an analysis of homeowner preferences for energy efficiency programs
    A new approach to acquiring energy savings : an analysis of homeowner preferences for energy efficiency programs by Ory, Kai

    Using a multinomial logit regression, this thesis shows that there is a significant portion of homeowners that are willing and able to improve their home energy efficiency by improving their windows or insulation without receiving a monetary incentive from a utility or government. Accordingly, utilities are unable to claim energy savings from projects completed by these homeowners. Thus, some homeowners and utilities alike would be better off using a third-party private business to foster energy efficiency.

  • Thumbnail for Brand assets and market value : the economic relevance of trademark portfolios
    Brand assets and market value : the economic relevance of trademark portfolios by Vallely, Sam

    This paper uses a novel dataset of trademark activity for U.S. apparel firms to examine the economic relevance of trademarks to firm market value. Trademarks are the legal representations of a firm’s brands and, as brand assets, have the ability to improve firms’ market position and influence consumer purchase behavior. However, our understanding of the role trademarks play in firms’ valuations in financial markets is limited. This study finds that firms’ trademark portfolios are value relevant to market participants, and carries important implications for corporate IP policies and practices.

  • Thumbnail for Examining determinants of wireless spectrum holdings for mobile telephony operators
    Examining determinants of wireless spectrum holdings for mobile telephony operators by Post, Jayson S.

    This paper investigates the determinants of carriers’ wireless spectrum holdings in counties across the United States. Through the use of a Heckman selection model, our equations exhibit results observable at the highest significance level. Size, carrier-owned towers and population counts/density were found to be primary determinants of spectrum ownership levels. Results yield significant implications for firms as spectrum position becomes increasingly crucial to success within the wireless industry.

  • Thumbnail for The economics of recent U.S. mergers and acquisitions
    The economics of recent U.S. mergers and acquisitions by Huang, Xiaoke

    This study examines the influences of mergers and acquisitions (M&As) on companies' profitability and compares these influences with economic conditions to discuss their significance. It hypothesizes that market power, total assets and synergistic effects are all positively related to profitability, but they are less significant than the economic influences such as economic growth, consumer confidence and producer confidence. Focusing on the largest U.S. mergers and acquisitions during the period from 1998 to 2003, two economic models are designed to test these hypotheses. The first model examines the relationship between M&A influences and profitability. The test results of this model suggest that market power and total assets are both significant to profitability and that synergistic effects are insignificant. The study also finds that increasing market power is 50 times more efficient than increasing total assets in generating profit. The second model examines the relationship between the economic influences and profitability, but the tests results are inconclusive and suggest that economic factors and profitability have non-linear correlations

  • Thumbnail for Systemic inequalities in the American health care system : the Latino experience during the H1N1 pandemic
    Systemic inequalities in the American health care system : the Latino experience during the H1N1 pandemic by Triedman, Natalie Knapp

    Insurance companies and politicians have long asserted that the United States health care system is the best in the world. This fairytale idealizes what is actually a broken system of care that fails to honor fundamental human rights. Millions of Americans have no safety net to fall back on in the case of an unexpected illness and are forced to make trade-offs between health services and other essential daily needs. The 50 million uninsured Americans “are acutely aware that our health care system is not working for everyone, and there is growing recognition that the major problems of rising cost and lack of access continue a real crisis.” However, policy changes are slow to come. The underlying structural factors that hamper efforts to improve U.S. health care are rarely addressed because of the economic and political constraints that shape health improvement projects. Thus, band-aids are applied to curb the symptoms of problems that are much more than skin deep.

  • Thumbnail for The U.S. view of human rights : my way or the highway
    The U.S. view of human rights : my way or the highway by Celeste, Richard F.

    Colorado College President Dick Celeste, a former U.S. ambassador to India and Peace Corps director, speaks at an American Civil Liberties Union forum. His talk is followed by an open discussion about human rights in the world. Recorded January 24, 2007. Part of Notable Lectures & Performances series, Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Make 'em laugh: the funny business of America
    Make 'em laugh: the funny business of America by Maslon, Laurence

    Laurence Maslon is the co-creator of "Make 'Em Laugh: The Funny Business of America," a six-part series broadcast nationally by PBS. "Make 'Em Laugh" is the first documentary of its kind to give context to nearly 100 years of American comedy on stage, film, radio, television, and stand-up and to honor the geniuses who created our country's unique form of performance humor. Part of Notable Lectures & Performances series, Colorado College. Recorded March 9, 2009.

  • Thumbnail for The healing of America: making sense of health care politics
    The healing of America: making sense of health care politics by Reid, T. R.

    T. R. Reid, a prizewinning Washington Post reporter and the author of several books, including "The Healing of America" and "The United States of Europe," is a frequent guest on NPR and has narrated and produced several PBS documentaries. Part of Notable Lectures & Performances series, Colorado College. Recorded March 4, 2010.

  • Thumbnail for Who built it? an analysis of American exceptionalism in contemporary politics
    Who built it? an analysis of American exceptionalism in contemporary politics by Wallace, Amanda Jean

    Shortly after becoming President of the United States in 2009, Barack Obama was asked by a reporter in Strasbourg, France whether or not he adhered to a philosophy of American exceptionalism. The reporter intended to mean whether Obama believed the United States is uniquely qualified to lead the world. The President began his response with the following: “I believe in American exceptionalism, just as I suspect that the Brits believe in British exceptionalism and the Greeks believe in Greek exceptionalism.” A year later, Governor of Massachusetts Mitt Romney wrote a book where he alleges this response proves President Obama “doesn't believe [American exceptionalism] at all” and criticized him for that stance. Furthermore, President Obama's response was brought up again during the 2012 election when Governor Romney challenged him for the Presidency. Even though the quote above is only the beginning of his entire reply, the entire exchange highlights the role American exceptionalism still plays in the political sphere. My essay emphasizes three important questions: the definition of American exceptionalism, its previous and current role in politics, and assessments of its validity from both advocates and critics.

  • Thumbnail for The American hero through the twentieth century
    The American hero through the twentieth century by Washburn, Victoria Brezze

    The American image of the hero underwent a paradigmatic shift in the twentieth century. This thesis examines the traditional model of the hero, why there has been a move away from that model, and the replacement archetypes we currently see today.

  • Thumbnail for Prevalence of male perpetrated domestic violence in the presence of traditional masculine values and hegemonic masculinity
    Prevalence of male perpetrated domestic violence in the presence of traditional masculine values and hegemonic masculinity by Marien, Colette Alyse

    Rates of domestic violence remain high in America despite many actions being taken against it. Though both men and women can be perpetrators of domestic violence, most often domestic violence is committed by men against women. Previous studies on the topic find that traditional masculine values and masculine gender role stress increase the likeliness of a man committing violence, and that gender role stress is higher in men who experience a form of masculinity marginalized from the hegemonic masculine ideal. In the present study I examine the effect that both traditional masculine values and hegemonic masculinity has on prevalence of male perpetrated domestic violence. I use six of the nine U.S. Census regions to carry out the study. By finding the average score or level of traditional masculine values, hegemonic masculinity, and prevalence of male perpetration in each of the six regions, I was able to observe the effect had on prevalence of male perpetration when traditional masculine values and hegemonic masculinity are present in the region. The goal was to find out if stronger traditional masculine values and lower access to the hegemonic masculine ideal in a region would lead to higher rates of male perpetrated domestic violence in that region. The results support both the previous findings and hypothesis, and also highlight the lowering effect that hegemonic masculinity has on rates of male perpetrated domestic violence.

  • Thumbnail for Hawaii statehood
    Hawaii statehood

    Political cartoon commenting on Hawaii's admittance into the Union. The caption reads: "Please ma'am, may I come in?" and is delivered by a timid chubby child representing Hawaii. Behind the kindly woman, "Miss Columbia," a motley assortment of people is running wild, including a "Chinaman" with a queue being pummeled by another immigrant.

  • Thumbnail for Moving away from Marx
    Moving away from Marx

    Illustration from the cover of TIME; photo of Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping in the middle of a three-panel folding screen, who is presiding over the transition from an agricultural socialist state to a new one marked by hamburgers, cameras, Nike shoes, high-rises and blue jeans.

  • Thumbnail for Red China's Chou Enlai
    Red China's Chou Enlai

    Cover of TIME magazine-- May 10, 1954; a smiling Chou Enlai is backed up by a blood-smeared dragon trying to break out from behind the "Bamboo Curtain."