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  • Thumbnail for "A self-discovery adventure" : the influence of American wilderness on Hmong refugee identity formation
    "A self-discovery adventure" : the influence of American wilderness on Hmong refugee identity formation by Hedlund, Rachel

    Although there is an emerging body of literature on ethnic groups and natural resource use in America, there is not much research regarding specific ethnic groups and their interactions with the American wilderness. This thesis explores the relationship between the American social constructions of wilderness and a specific refugee population in America—the Hmong people. Interviews were conducted with participants in the Twin Cities of Minnesota with conversations focusing on identity and wilderness interactions. These interviews revealed that the Hmong, a Southeast Asian people with a deeply rooted connection to nature interact with the wilderness in ways that differ from the American norm. Yet, through segmented assimilation, younger generations of Hmong have also acculturated to the American perception of wilderness as a place of self-discovery.

  • Thumbnail for Tea Room image 1
    Tea Room image 1 by Seiji Suzuki

    The tearoom is a masterpiece of traditional Japanese architectural design and artisanship. It incorporates both formal shoin-style elements, based on the design of a study or library in a Buddhist temple, as well as the sukiya elements of a humble cottage.

  • Thumbnail for Tea Room image 2 (detail)
    Tea Room image 2 (detail) by Seiji Suzuki

    The tearoom is a masterpiece of traditional Japanese architectural design and artisanship. It incorporates both formal shoin-style elements, based on the design of a study or library in a Buddhist temple, as well as the sukiya elements of a humble cottage. The circular window of the tearoom is not designed for looking outward. It is kept shut so that guests focus inward and ultimately reflect on their own state of mind. Zen scrolls often depict the mind with a circle written in one brush stroke. The subdued light in a tearoom lends itself to contemplation.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese competition : who's to blame for the deindustrialization of America?
    Chinese competition : who's to blame for the deindustrialization of America? by Pagan, Russell

    Current legislation seeks to label China a “currency manipulator” due to its allegedly unfair trade practices. The coincidence of increased Sino-US trade flows with domestic job loss in manufacturing fuels a great deal of the growing anti-China sentiment in the US. Proponents of the Exchange Rate Oversight Reform Act attribute America’s long-experienced decline in manufacturing employment to competition from rising Chinese imports, therefore advocating protectionist measures. This thesis examines the validity of such claims, suggesting the possible significance of technologically-induced productivity gains rather than increased trade liberalization. Employing an ordinary least squares regression model, this study tests for the determinants of manufacturing job-loss between 1983 and 2005. Results of this study indicate the significance not only of increased imports from China, but from the entirety of the US’s low-wage trading partners. However, negligible significance is attributed to enhanced productivity during this period.

  • Thumbnail for Determinants of violent crime rates : observing education and population density
    Determinants of violent crime rates : observing education and population density by Lesnansky, Christopher James

    Education and violent crime rates appear to be negatively correlated. Research has also suggested that living in a densely populated city may promote more violent behavior. This paper explored the effects that education and population density has on violent crime rates in cities within the United States. It was found that if a higher percentage of population graduates high school, violent crime rates will decrease. It also was found that as population density increases, violent crimes will increase as well. This should promote the notion that the more funding put into education will have a direct impact on lowering violent crime rates.

  • Thumbnail for Ski resort marketing in the United States
    Ski resort marketing in the United States by Webb, Derrick Scott

    Marketing strategies have changed over the last few decades and are still changing. Marketing managers need to realize these changes in marketing strategies and use them effectively to market to the changing demographic of skiers. Skiers are getting older and the numbers of advanced skiers is increasing, but as they get older more and more of the baby boomer generation is exiting the sport there needs to be a strong effort to encourage younger and newer participants to avidly pursue the sport and more importantly start them at your resort and keep them as lifelong participants. The purpose of this thesis is to research different marketing strategies and campaigns so that resort marketers can determine where and how to allocate them. In addition it will determine which marketable expenditures positively affect skier visits.

  • Thumbnail for The college gap : an analysis of postsecondary tuition variance among states
    The college gap : an analysis of postsecondary tuition variance among states by Thomas, Trevor

    Projected increases in demand for postsecondary credentials in the labor market have exposed an immediate need for the United States to significantly increase its college attainment rate. The current growth rate of college tuition and fees, however, has been outstripping inflation for decades, and is limiting access for a growing number of would-be college students. Significant variance in college tuition and financial aid levels among states complicate the issue, having prevented researchers from finding the true indicators that govern college tuition levels. I posit that increased future earnings potential is one of these indicators causing tuition price variance throughout the U.S. Specifically, each state’s college wage premium – the amount a college graduate can expect to make over a high school graduate – causes its tuition prices through a supply/demand equilibrium. I hypothesize that the average public college tuition in a state is directly correlated with its college wage premium. Colleges in states with a high premium have a more valuable product and are able to charge more. I test this by collecting data from College Board and the U.S. Census Bureau on average college tuition and median-level college wage premium, and run a simple OLS regression to determine the strength of correlation. I then discuss my results in the context of the United States’ college attainment goals.

  • Thumbnail for Sarbanes-Oxley and privatization frequency in America
    Sarbanes-Oxley and privatization frequency in America by Steveson, Patrick Taylor

    The quality of financial records is a topic of constant debate, even more so during times of recession. The United States faced a banking crisis in 2002, which rocked the very foundations of the business sector. Sarbanes-Oxley passed in response to the banking crisis, implementing a series of new standards applying to all U.S. public company executives, and firms as a whole. Consequences for fraudulent activity have evolved to be more severe, and external auditors have become more autonomous. This thesis analyzes the frequency of firms going-private in the United States. Going private transactions were collected from January 1, 2007 to February 5, 2014, in order to further investigate the behavior of the privatization trend in America. The study concluded that there was a decline in the overall number of firms going private, in addition to a change in the industries witnessing the highest frequency of privatization. Furthermore, the FEI surveys concluded that compliance costs have declined over the years following the passage of SOX. These declines support that SOX may no longer be driving firms to privatization as compliance no longer implies as significant of a financial burden.

  • Thumbnail for U.S. trade barriers and female employment in the Bangladeshi ready-made garment industry
    U.S. trade barriers and female employment in the Bangladeshi ready-made garment industry by Keating, Madeline

    With the rise of industrialization in developing countries, the Bangladeshi ready-made garment industry has taken off in the last 40 years. With this rise in textile and garment factories, women have been able to participate with much more volume in the Bangladeshi economy because approximately 90% of garment workers in Bangladesh are females. The United States has consistently put import duties on Bangladeshi textile and garment goods higher than those of almost every other LDC, thus affecting the competitive nature of Bangladesh's number one GDP generator; apparel and textiles. This thesis aims to look at the effect that the high US tariff rates on Bangladesh's ready-made garments have on the female employment rate in the Bangladeshi garment factories

  • Thumbnail for Universities, industries and your wallet : university impacts on earnings per worker
    Universities, industries and your wallet : university impacts on earnings per worker by Berglund, Hanna

    Research university impacts are difficult to measure, but vital to understanding the economic development surrounding these universities. This study examines whether research universities in the United States contribute significantly to regional economic development and whether agglomeration economies explain earnings per worker based on university presence or not. Drawing on county-by-county data for the first time, more precisely highlights more specifically the differences between regions with universities and regions without. The effects of university presence, federal, state and institutional research and development expenditures, and industry presence on earnings per worker are tested using multivariate regression analysis. The study finds that university presence alone impacts the presence of industries related to science and technology. University impact measurements are becoming more important as universities compete for government funding.

  • Thumbnail for The effects of local land use regulation on property values, journey to work, and the quality of public service delivery : case studies of Boulder, Berkeley, and Fort Collins
    The effects of local land use regulation on property values, journey to work, and the quality of public service delivery : case studies of Boulder, Berkeley, and Fort Collins by Muire, Annie

    Beginning in the early 1960's, local governments throughout the United States have implemented growth management policies intended to influence the pattern of development and restrict growth. These regulations affect the conditions of community life by increasing property values, shifting demographics, and altering the delivery of public services. This thesis examines these effects through case studies of the City of Boulder, the City of Berkeley, and the City of Fort Collins, using data primarily from the US Census Bureau. It is hypothesized that the city with the most growth management policies will experience these effects to a greater magnitude. This was found to be partly true; there are other overriding factors that contribute to these changes more so than the presence or absence of growth management policies.

  • Thumbnail for Review : Embedded librarians : moving beyond one-shot instruction
    Review : Embedded librarians : moving beyond one-shot instruction by Vella, Lia

    Lia Vella reviews the book, "Embedded Librarians: Moving Beyond One-Shot Instruction." This book is edited by Cassandra Kvenild and Kaijsa Calkins. In her review, Vella shares, "For the first time last year, my library tried an “embedded” relationship with a required freshman class. As a Reference & Instruction Librarian, I attended the lectures, worked with each of the class sections, and created and staffed a “Help Station” with a rotating display of relevant books and articles. This book, Embedded Librarians: Moving Beyond One-Shot Instruction, was, therefore, of interest to me and helped me to formulate ideas about how I wanted to implement my own program."

  • Thumbnail for Review : Without a net : librarians bridging the digital divide
    Review : Without a net : librarians bridging the digital divide by Stoddart, Rick

    Rick Stoddart reviews the book, "Without a Net : Librarians Bridging the Digital Divide." In this review, Stoddard states that Jessamyn West "has written a sorely needed primer on the practical issues many libraries may encounter related to the digital divide and their patrons."

  • Thumbnail for Emma Goldman
    Emma Goldman by Falk, Candace

    Candace Falk, Goldman biographer and director of the Emma Goldman Papers Project, uncovers the history and legacy of this influential American anarchist. Since 1980, the Emma Goldman Papers Project at the University of California-Berkeley has collected, organized, and edited tens of thousands of documents by and about Goldman from around the world. The leading authority on Goldman, Falk is the author of "Love, Anarchy, and Emma Goldman". Part of Notable Lectures & Performances series, Colorado College. Recorded September 23, 2010.

  • Thumbnail for This beautiful city
    This beautiful city by Civilians (Theater company)

    "This Beautiful City" is a provocative musical about the growth of the evangelical movement in Colorado Springs, created by the New York-based investigative theater company The Civilians and is the culmination of their residency in Colorado Springs in 2006. While conducting interviews with residents involved with or affected by the mega-church movement, scandal broke about New Life Church pastor Ted Haggard, providing the play’s creators and the people of Colorado Springs with an unprecedented opportunity as those events unfolded. Part of Notable Lectures & Performances series, Colorado College. Recorded December 6, 2009.

  • Thumbnail for The healing of America: making sense of health care politics
    The healing of America: making sense of health care politics by Reid, T. R.

    T. R. Reid, a prizewinning Washington Post reporter and the author of several books, including "The Healing of America" and "The United States of Europe," is a frequent guest on NPR and has narrated and produced several PBS documentaries. Part of Notable Lectures & Performances series, Colorado College. Recorded March 4, 2010.

  • Thumbnail for Elections 2008: endgame and reflections
    Elections 2008: endgame and reflections by Sondermann, Eric , Loevy, Robert D., 1935- , Buxton, Chuck , Fuller, Timothy, 1940-

    This homecoming panel is part of the college's Sondermann Series: Elections 2008. Panelists include Chuck Buxton '68, senior editor at the Santa Rosa Press Democrat; Eric Sondermann '76, president of SE2 Associates in Denver; and CC political science professors Timothy Fuller and Bob Loevy. Recorded October 10, 2008.

  • Thumbnail for The omnivore's dilemma: searching for the perfect meal in a fast-food world
    The omnivore's dilemma: searching for the perfect meal in a fast-food world by Pollan, Michael

    All creatures are defined ecologically by how they fit into a food chain. For humans, food industrialization has obscured this once-plain fact; most Americans are only dimly aware that their food represents their most profound engagement with the natural world. Michael Pollan, author of "The Botany of Desire" and "The Omnivore's Dilemma," both New York Times best sellers, conducted a series of personal explorations of the food chain: growing a genetically modified potato, tracing an organic TV dinner from grocery freezer to farm and buying and following a steer from insemination to steak. Pollan tells these stories to tease out conclusions about what's gone wrong with the industrial food system and its implications for our health. He also explores healthier alternatives to industrial food. Part of Notable Lectures & Performances series, Colorado College. Recorded February 8, 2007.

  • Thumbnail for Why the United States needs a new Constitution
    Why the United States needs a new Constitution by Levinson, Sanford, 1941-

    Sandy Levinson, is author of "Constitutional Faith," "Written in Stone: Public Monuments in Changing Societies," "Wrestling With Diversity," and "Our Undemocratic Constitution: Where the Constitution Goes Wrong (and How We the People Can Correct It) as well as numerous articles and book reviews in professional and popular journals. Part of Notable Lectures & Performances series, Colorado College. Recorded March 5, 2007.

  • Thumbnail for Making sense of the 2008 elections
    Making sense of the 2008 elections by Broder, David S.

    Political columnist David Broder speaks about the 2008 presidential election. Part of Notable Lectures & Performances series, Colorado College. Recorded on April 1, 2008.

  • Thumbnail for Comparative wildland urban fire policy : the Australian prepare, act, and survive approach during the Waldo Canyon Fire in the United States
    Comparative wildland urban fire policy : the Australian prepare, act, and survive approach during the Waldo Canyon Fire in the United States by Landsman, Charles King

    Wildfires worldwide are increasing in intensity and frequency while more residents move into the wildland urban interface. Fires such as the Waldo Canyon Fire near Colorado Springs, Colorado emphasized this sad reality in June of 2012. Because of worsening conditions, many regions around the United States are exploring innovative policies to ensure residents are protected and the loss of structures is reduced. One such policy is the Prepare, Act, Survive approach developed by the Australians. Prepare, Act, Survive emphasizes mutual responsibility between residents and fire or land management authorities and encourages residents located in fire prone areas to prepare their property well before a blaze. Residents are then formally allowed to stay and defend their properties if they wish to do so or encouraged to leave well before the fire threatens them if they desire. This paper explores both the American Mandatory Evacuation policy and the Australian Prepare, Act, Survive approach. Finally, it predicts how many homes could have potentially been saved if residents had been allowed to stay and defend their property during the Waldo Canyon Fire.

  • Thumbnail for Who built it? an analysis of American exceptionalism in contemporary politics
    Who built it? an analysis of American exceptionalism in contemporary politics by Wallace, Amanda Jean

    Shortly after becoming President of the United States in 2009, Barack Obama was asked by a reporter in Strasbourg, France whether or not he adhered to a philosophy of American exceptionalism. The reporter intended to mean whether Obama believed the United States is uniquely qualified to lead the world. The President began his response with the following: “I believe in American exceptionalism, just as I suspect that the Brits believe in British exceptionalism and the Greeks believe in Greek exceptionalism.” A year later, Governor of Massachusetts Mitt Romney wrote a book where he alleges this response proves President Obama “doesn't believe [American exceptionalism] at all” and criticized him for that stance. Furthermore, President Obama's response was brought up again during the 2012 election when Governor Romney challenged him for the Presidency. Even though the quote above is only the beginning of his entire reply, the entire exchange highlights the role American exceptionalism still plays in the political sphere. My essay emphasizes three important questions: the definition of American exceptionalism, its previous and current role in politics, and assessments of its validity from both advocates and critics.

  • Thumbnail for The Environmental Protection Agency’s review of the Pebble Mine : key considerations for a large-scale mining proposal in Bristol Bay, Alaska
  • Thumbnail for “Being available” : the school counselor in public and private high schools
    “Being available” : the school counselor in public and private high schools by Gil, Lily

    In this paper, the author examines the role of counselors in public and private high schools. This study aims to identify if there exists a discrepancy in the role and responsibilities of counselors based on the type of school, whether high- or low-achieving, upper- or lower-class, private or public, etc. and what the implications of this possible discrepancy may be. Utilizing qualitative interviews of five counselors practicing at five unique schools, the study illustrates inconsistencies in the role and responsibilities of counselors at these contrasting schools. Similarly, this paper exposes a potentially significant positive relationship between socioeconomic status of public high schools and their increased similarity with private high schools over their public counterparts, and suggests the involvement of counselors in the elimination of larger social problems.

  • Thumbnail for Chicana/o language, culture, and history : identity construction and self-representation of Mexican-Americans
    Chicana/o language, culture, and history : identity construction and self-representation of Mexican-Americans by Steeler, Elizabeth

    The following research concerning Chicana/o identity formation and self-representation was conducted at The Colorado College throughout November and December of 2011, and January and February of 2012. Not only are established theories on identity and culture utilized but research case studies and other ethnographies on the subject of Chicana/o language and culture are also examined in the following project. Along with this review of existing frameworks I examine Chicana/o culture and language through the analysis of various works of Chicana/o literature. Using these assorted resources, I show how Chicana/o language, culture, and history give structure to the identities of Mexican-Americans living in the United States. Research on this specific topic is important because immigration from Mexico is on the forefront of the political arena in the United States. The prevalence of Mexican-Americans living in the United States is encouraging important changes in economic and institutional policies. In order to make these changes, there must be knowledge of the Chicana/o language, culture, and history. How these concepts shape the identities of Mexican Americans is integral in understanding the specific policies that have been, and will continue to affect Chicanas/os all over the United States. My research will help bring this information into the public and academic spheres as well as demonstrate the roles that language, culture, and history play in shaping identity and creating a representation of oneself.