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9 hits

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 17  --  "Many names written in charcoal on a wall"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 17 -- "Many names written in charcoal on a wall" by Matsumoro, Kazuo

    Many names written in charcoal on a wall -- Explanation by the artist: "Part of the wall at Takeya Elementary School. The names of missing people were written in charcoal by those looking for them. 'Hisako Nishimura - tell me where your are - Mother' 'Kazuko, come here' 'Toshie Mitsutani is OK' 'Ippei Masuda, Miyoko is OK, going to Mukaihara' 'Father, Mother both OK, come to Hijiyama Gobenden.' " -- 1,280 m from the hypocenter, Takeya Elementary School, Takara-machi. The artist was 32 at the time of the bombing, 61 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 20  --  "The female student I passed was my sister."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 20 -- "The female student I passed was my sister." by Ota, Haruyo

    The female student I passed was my sister -- Explanation by the artist: "It was like a road but there was no road. Not a single person could get through. I was worried about getting there before dark, so I walked right by two female students. One had bandages on her head and arms. One arm was in a sling of calico cloth. The other was wearing a uniform drenched with blood, her head wrapped, face covered with blood, hair singed red. She looked like a demon. For some reason, I spoke to her and discovered to my astonishment that she was my sisiter. I pinched my cheek thinking I must be dreaming." -- August 6, 1945, 3:30 - 4:00 p.m. -- 800m from the hypocenter, near Dobashi. The artist was 18 at the time of the bombing, 48 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 14  --  "Injured dying one after the next, people looking for family"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 14 -- "Injured dying one after the next, people looking for family" by Anonymous

    Injured dying one after the next, people looking for familyured d -- Explanation by the Artist: king fMorning, noon and night, the injured died. White medicines applied [to] burns made pores look bright red. Many were carrying huge loads, calling out, searching for parents, siblings, friends. Relief teams called, 'Anyone here from such and such neighborhood?' I think it was about the 8th when three young soldiers saluted and left. After they left, we heard they were suicide troops sent in from Etajima island. -- The artist was 19 at the time of the bombing, 49 at the time he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 18  --  "A line of burned lunchboxes"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 18 -- "A line of burned lunchboxes" by Takeuchi, Isamu

    A line of burned lunchboxes, Art -- Exlpanation by the artist: buriedAfter morning assembly, they were probably doing calisthenics. They seemed to be junior high students. I wonder where the owners of these lunchboxes were, laid out so neatly. Because this drill ground was near the hypocenter, the lost lunchboxes were burned but still retained their shape, which makes my heart ache. Thinking of the kindness and love some mother put into each, for them to become last lunches. . . -- 360 m from the hypocenter, Western Drill Ground, Moto-machi. The artist was 25 at the time of the bombing, 82 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 15  --  "Searching"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 15 -- "Searching" by Takeuchi, Isamu

    Searching -- Explanation by the artist: "Bodies lined up along the road for pick-up." The artist was 25 at the time of the bombing, 82 at the time when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 22  --  "Finding a husband by his leather belt"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 22 -- "Finding a husband by his leather belt" by Ogasawara, Shodo

    Finding a husband by his leather belturvivo -- Explanation by the artist: his leA woman (perhaps 34 or 35) with a baby on her back brought what seemed to be her mother-in-law, a woman of about 60, to the place where bodies were being kept. She had spent two days searching the city fruitlessly for her husband. All of the bodies were black from soot and dirt and terribly swollen. 'This leather belt is definitely my husband's. The face is also similar. I'm sure it's him.' A reunion of tears. -- 1290m from the hypocenter, on the grounds of Sumiyoshi Shrine, Kako-machi (now Sumiyoshi-cho). The artist was 17 at the time of the bombing, 74 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 16  --  "Searching for mother among the straw mats"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 16 -- "Searching for mother among the straw mats" by Kuwamoto, Katsuko

    Searching for mother among the straw mats -- Explanation by the artist: "My mother, who lived in HIroshima, was missing so my aunt and I (I was 6 years old), who had been at an evacuation site, went to the riverbank near Misasa. We searched for her under the straw mats covering the many people who had breathed their last on the riverbank. One face was swollen reddish copper, but was still white around the eyes (probably where glasses had reflected the heat ray). Under the mid-summer sun, the stench was unbearable." -- The artist was 6 at the time of the bombing, 63 at the time when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 21  --  "Sister, holding brother grown cold"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 21 -- "Sister, holding brother grown cold" by Tagashira, Tadayuki

    Sister holding brother grown cold -- Explanation by the artist: "This girl went out searching for her younger brother in the morning. About two hours before this picture, she found him. 'I want water! I want water!' he said, so she gave him some. He drank it happily. 'Sister, sister, I'm cold! I'm cold!' he said, so she held him. His body gradually grew colder and colder, then he breathed his last." -- 900m from the hypocenter, in front of the main gate of the Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital. The artist was 43 at the time of the bombing, 72 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 19  --  "Mother and me joyfully reuniting in the ruins"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 19 -- "Mother and me joyfully reuniting in the ruins" by Furui, Natsuko

    Mother and me joyfully reuniting in the ruins -- Explanation by the artist: "Looking for my mother, I searched among the crowds of people trudging out of the city. Then, ahead of me I noticed my mother walking my way in her underwear and with blood on her shoulder. 'Mother!!' We held each other and cried by the side of the road. My mother had been trapped under the house, unable to get out, but neighbors freed her. It was a miracle. If we hadn't met then, I would have spent the whole night wandering through the rubble and smoke looking for her." -- The artist was 22 at the time of the bombing, 78 when she drew this picture.