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  • Thumbnail for A hedonic model valuation of natural amenities in El Paso County, Colorado
    A hedonic model valuation of natural amenities in El Paso County, Colorado by Riedel, Kie

    This study examines how proximity to greenspaces and water bodies impact residential home sales prices in El Paso County, Colorado using a hedonic pricing approach. Values for proximity to natural amenities are first estimated using Euclidean distances. Distances are then calculated by a road network to determine how residents value accessibility and use of environmental attributes, in particular. In the Euclidean model, home sale prices increase with closer proximity to parks, lakes, golf courses, sports/recreation specialty facilities, and Pikes National Forest. Closer proximity to streams, however, leads to a decrease in housing price and closer proximity to natural areas has an insignificant impact on housing. In the road network model, distance to natural areas by road becomes significant and indicates that closer proximity and greater use access of natural areas leads to higher home sales prices. Closer distances to parks by road, however, have the opposite effect and home prices decrease with increasing proximity. All other greenspace and water body variables remain fairly similar in the road network model. These results illustrate the importance of environmental amenities to homeowners and can be used to help policymakers and urban planners make decisions regarding preservation, maintenance, and design of natural amenities.

  • Thumbnail for Relict tallgrass prairie of the Upper Black Squirrel Creek drainage, El Paso County, Colorado : change since the 1940's
    Relict tallgrass prairie of the Upper Black Squirrel Creek drainage, El Paso County, Colorado : change since the 1940's by Tsocanos, Sebastian A. E.

    In the mid 1940s remnant tallgrass prairie near Colorado Springs was recognized in vegetation studies on the plains. Tallgrass prairie is unusual in the arid Great Plains, and is of significant conservation value, particularly given the past and present pressures of urban expansion, intense grazing, and water development. Our study examined the question of whether this community type still exists in the region, if the extent of the community type has changed since then, and whether the species composition has changed. We found that while true tallgrass prairie vegetation is no longer dominant at many of the sites used in the original studies, patches of true tallgrass prairie still occur in the area. The extent of tallgrass prairie in the vicinity has clearly declined over the past 70 years. The vegetation of remaining patches is composed of very similar species to those originally documented. We found that the dominant vegetation is still characteristic of true tallgrass prairie. Among the important grasses were prairie dropseed, indian grass, little bluestem), and big bluestem. Important widespread forbs indicative of true tallgrass prairie included american licorice (Glycyrrhiza lepidota), stiff goldenrod (Oligoneuron rigidum), white heath aster (Symphyotrichum ericoides), and purple prairie clover (Dalea purpurea) among many others. We determined that overall precipitation and temperature in the locality has not changed dramatically since the 1940’s. The alluvial aquifer across much of the area is evidently little changed, but hydrology on a site-by-site basis is poorly understood. While the continued existence of some true tallgrass prairie communities here is reassuring, their diminished extent is cause for concern, especially given increasing pressure from urban expansion, livestock grazing, invasive species, and water development. The uncertain status of future temperature and precipitation, as well as the maintenance of critical surface and subsurface hydrologic regimes is also of concern.

  • Thumbnail for The choice between silence and ending violence : an analysis of protection order seeking for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault
    The choice between silence and ending violence : an analysis of protection order seeking for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault by Shephard, Bridgett Nichole

    This thesis suggests that certain characteristics make victims of domestic violence and sexual assault more or less likely to seek a Temporary Protection Order (TPO). In Colorado Springs, CO, the annual number of sexual assaults is exceptionally high and domestic violence incidents are frequent. Using data from TESSA, the only agency that is serving victims in Colorado Springs and El Paso County, CO, this thesis examines self-reported victim characteristics in conjunction with TPO seeking behaviors. After analyzing the data with a probit regression, the results have shown that domestic violence and sexual assault are very different crimes, and that domestic violence victims and sexual assault victims display some important differences when it comes to reporting the crimes and seeking TPO’s. Victims of domestic violence are more likely to seek a protection order against an offender who was an acquaintance, but victims of sexual assault are less likely to seek a protection order against an acquaintance. At the same time, all victims demonstrated some similarities in TPO reporting. TESSA clients that lived in rural locations, that had lower annual familial incomes, and that were associated with the military were less likely, to varying degrees, to seek a TPO. The results of this thesis, if combined with community awareness, engagement and cooperation, have the potential to reduce the occurrence of domestic violence and sexual assault in Colorado Springs.

  • Thumbnail for Medicine - Boswell Preston Anderson M.D.
    Medicine - Boswell Preston Anderson M.D. by Anderson, Boswell Preston

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 46, Medicine - Boswell Preston Anderson M.D. include: 1 7-page, handwritten letter, dated August 2, 1901, describing the “history of medicine in El Paso County for the past 30 years,” signed by Boswell Preston Anderson, M.D.; 1 b&w photo of Dr. Anderson; 1 calling card, “Dr. Boswell P. Anderson.”