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  • Thumbnail for How to value companies in developing countries
    How to value companies in developing countries by Carter, Lee

    This thesis studies the effect of macroeconomic factors on investor valuation in developing countries. Currently, more and more investors are looking to developing countries for investment, but few of them know how to accurately value companies in these countries. Investors feel that there is extra risk involved when investing in developing countries, but how much? And what determines this risk? This study first finds the discount rate, the rate by which investors discount a company in a foreign country as compared to a similar company in the United States, in each of 17 countries. Then, these discount rates are compared to macroeconomic variables that describe development, infrastructure, and business environment in a country. We believe that if a country is less developed and has less infrastructure in place investors will place a larger discount on companies in that country.

  • Thumbnail for Libraries and sustainability in developing countries : leadership models based on three successful organizations
    Libraries and sustainability in developing countries : leadership models based on three successful organizations by Michael, Athena

    The purpose of this study is to examine leadership styles highly effective in building sustainable libraries in developing countries. The author studies the leadership of three organizations: Room to Read, Central Asia Institute (CAI), and the Hester J. Hodgdon (HJH) Libraries for All Program, each focusing to some extent on libraries and literacy in developing countries. Following a review of the history of sustainability in the library community, aspects of Andy Hargreaves’ and Dean Fink’s principles of sustainable leadership are referenced in an analysis of the leadership styles found in these organizations. The author concludes that, although Room to Read, CAI, and HJH Libraries for All Program were not founded by librarians, their successful modes of leadership represent collaborative initiatives that help build sustainable communities and offer models of leadership for the profession of librarianship.

  • Thumbnail for The role of engineers in poverty reduction: challenges and opportunities
    The role of engineers in poverty reduction: challenges and opportunities by Amadei, Bernard, 1954-

    Dr. Bernard Amadei, founder of the organization "Engineers Without Borders", presents an informative and passionate program of the small engineering projects in third world countries that have improved the lives of the people living there. Part of Notable Lectures & Performances series, Colorado College. Recorded October 20, 2009.

  • Thumbnail for Stuck in a rut with primary products : the impact of colonization on trade and growth patterns
    Stuck in a rut with primary products : the impact of colonization on trade and growth patterns by Nadar, Devin

    The pattern of stagnating growth and underdevelopment remains an all too common phenomenon for countries with a colonial past, regardless of efforts by developmental economists and international organizations. In order to increase our understanding of what factors lead to this pattern, this study investigates the link between colonization and growth by examining trade characteristics of prior colonies. Using data from the World Bank, the IMF and the OECD, this study utilizes simultaneous equation modeling to determine how trade patterns can provide the link between colonization and the current state of underdevelopment in Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America. This leads to a more refined understanding of why economic development fails to occur even in a period of booming international trade and globalization. Probing into the trade patterns of these nations, this paper answers the following question: Does colonial identity impact trade and growth patterns today? This study finds that history plays a role in determining how countries trade and grow, but the results are varied depending on the analysis utilized. Furthermore, there is a link between the types of goods traded and the growth of a nation, but trade in primary products does not necessarily limit a country’s growth potential.

  • Thumbnail for Using gender disparities in literacy to predict fertility in developing countries : a panel regression study
    Using gender disparities in literacy to predict fertility in developing countries : a panel regression study by Mungi, Chinmay P.

    This paper presents an empirical analysis of fertility in the developing world, demonstrating that fertility reductions can be attributed to a number of important explanatory variables, particularly those related to health status, gender inequalities in literacy, and household income. The paper adds to the expansive literature on fertility by exploring whether differing levels of success in effecting the demographic transition can be attributed to these explanatory variables. The data used are from 57 developing nations and cover the time period 1975-2014.

  • Thumbnail for Brain drain's effect on development : accounts from the Denver Ethiopian diaspora
    Brain drain's effect on development : accounts from the Denver Ethiopian diaspora by Wolday, Martha Workneh

    This thesis explores the causes and effects of brain drain on Ethiopia’s development. A snowball sample was taken of participants who self-identified as members of the Ethiopia diaspora in the Denver-metropolitan area (n=8). Data was collected through individual interviews. The interviews were converted into typed transcriptions and synthesized using the grounded theory methodology. The theory proposed is one of struggle through the axial codes that were developed: migration, remittances, communal living, reasons for remaining, reasons for desire to leave, development efforts and transition. The axial codes are assessed in relation to the presented theory of struggle and exploring the effects on Ethiopia’s development. Through this data and analysis, the Ethiopian diaspora has greater access to further understanding their role in development and take actions that have a measurable impact.