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  • Thumbnail for Laptop use in the classroom : a cost/benefit analysis based on participation
    Laptop use in the classroom : a cost/benefit analysis based on participation by Vargas, Matthew Voyta

    The College classroom environment has changed since the advent of the personal computers. More and more students are frequently bringing their laptops into the classroom at colleges around the country. While those students bring their laptops to the classroom, instructors’ perceptions of laptop use continue to change. Therefore, the issue of this generation is whether or not students understand their own perceptions of the costs and benefits of laptop use given the costs of diminishment of learning in the classroom and the benefits of improved learning through software and programs on the laptop. The purpose of this thesis was to determine whether or not students whom bring their laptop to the classroom understand if their use of laptops are improving or diminishing their learning experience based on participation. This research surveyed six classes in the Economics Department during Block Three of the 2011-2012 Colorado College school year. The survey information was then be used for regression analysis in order to determine dependent variable impact on the independent variables: LISTEN, ASKQUES, ANSQUES, and DISCUSS.

  • Thumbnail for Chicana/o language, culture, and history : identity construction and self-representation of Mexican-Americans
    Chicana/o language, culture, and history : identity construction and self-representation of Mexican-Americans by Steeler, Elizabeth

    The following research concerning Chicana/o identity formation and self-representation was conducted at The Colorado College throughout November and December of 2011, and January and February of 2012. Not only are established theories on identity and culture utilized but research case studies and other ethnographies on the subject of Chicana/o language and culture are also examined in the following project. Along with this review of existing frameworks I examine Chicana/o culture and language through the analysis of various works of Chicana/o literature. Using these assorted resources, I show how Chicana/o language, culture, and history give structure to the identities of Mexican-Americans living in the United States. Research on this specific topic is important because immigration from Mexico is on the forefront of the political arena in the United States. The prevalence of Mexican-Americans living in the United States is encouraging important changes in economic and institutional policies. In order to make these changes, there must be knowledge of the Chicana/o language, culture, and history. How these concepts shape the identities of Mexican Americans is integral in understanding the specific policies that have been, and will continue to affect Chicanas/os all over the United States. My research will help bring this information into the public and academic spheres as well as demonstrate the roles that language, culture, and history play in shaping identity and creating a representation of oneself.

  • Thumbnail for Media regulated lives : a comparative study on the effects of media regulation on Australian and American college students
    Media regulated lives : a comparative study on the effects of media regulation on Australian and American college students by Reissmann, Judith Nonhlanhla

    This thesis explores the relationship between media regulation and social status by conducting comparative study between Australian and American college students. The thesis defines popular culture as a new form of high culture used to elevate social status. The hypothesis states that less media regulation exposes people to more popular culture and therefore improves their social status. Australians live in a context of less media regulation and are therefore popular culture and media exposures are hypothesized to have less of an impact on their social statuses compared to Americans. In order to test this hypothesis, a survey was sent to Australian students at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, and to students at the Colorado College in the United States. The survey results and analysis revealed that though American students have higher levels of achievement and aspiration in college compared to Australian students, American students have significantly lower prestige scores. The results of the thesis as well as other alternative hypotheses ask questions and start a discussion for future comparative research on media regulation and society.

  • Thumbnail for "I'm on the in": an integrative Bourdieuian analysis of gender negotiation among female marijuana users at Colorado College
    "I'm on the in": an integrative Bourdieuian analysis of gender negotiation among female marijuana users at Colorado College by Rogers, Katie

    Existing analyses of gender relations in youth marijuana subcultures have consistently shown these social fields to be economically, socially, and culturally male-dominated. Despite this disparity and the questions it raises about the gendered investments and negotiations of woman who tap into this subculture, scholars have yet to employ case-specific, qualitative methods to investigate the subjective experiences of female marijuana users. Building on contemporary feminist integrations of gender into Pierre Bourdieu’s theories of social reproduction, this thesis uses the hybrid concepts of gendered field, gendered capital, and gendered habitus to perceive a typology of female marijuana users at Colorado College from 17 purposively sampled interviews. I posit that of the four observable types – guest moochers, honorary den bros, token stoner chicks, and independent floaters – two exhibit distinct forms of gender reflexivity, a self-consciousness of gender investments, negotiations, and constraints as components of a socially constructed game rather than as biological imperatives. These two forms of gender reflexivity – which I call tactical resignation and emergent reflexivity – raise further questions about the capacity for inquiry and discourse to induce reflexivity and the experience of marginalized gender identities in other social fields.