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  • Thumbnail for Morgan, Sallie Payne
    Morgan, Sallie Payne by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Sallie Payne Morgan came to Colorado College as Assistant Dean of Women in 1949, and became the Dean of Women the following year. One of her main interests was recruiting girls with good academic records and procuring funding for them. Another priority of Dean Morgan was addressing restrictive social rules for women. She describes the discussions about women's dorm hours, her effort to extend them and to lighten the punishments for infringements. She instituted an honor dorm and eventually replaced the older dorm directors with younger women. Morgan talks about memorable people: President Gill, Dean Lew Worner, Glenn Gray, George McCue, Howard Olson, and Frank Krutzke. She retired at 65 in 1957 but returned in 1964 to work as a part-time receptionist at Tutt Library staying for twelve years (retired at age 81).

  • Thumbnail for Jones, Raymond Dean
    Jones, Raymond Dean by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Raymond D. Jones (CC class of 1967) was born in Pueblo, Colorado on November 30, 1945. While at Colorado College, Jones was the first African-American president of the Beta Theta Pi fraternity. After graduating from Colorado College, he received his law degree from Harvard University in 1971. At the time of this interview he was a judge in the Denver District Court, appointed by Governor Richard Lamm. Jones’ interview focuses on campus life in the 1960’s, attitudes about civil rights in Colorado Springs, and experiences from the perspective of a minority student.

  • Thumbnail for Makepeace, J. Tyler
    Makepeace, J. Tyler by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936- , Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    John Tyler Makepeace (CC class of 1969) was born on October 25, 1947, in Waterbury, Connecticut. He attended Washington and Lee University for one year before transferring to Colorado College in 1966. After graduating with a B.A. in political science, he studied law at the University of Colorado and received his degree in 1972. From 1972 to 1977, Makepeace was senior deputy district attorney. From 1975 to 1977, he was also chief juvenile division district attorney. He was the founder of CHINS-UP in 1975 and an unsuccessful legislative candidate for District 18 in 1978. During the time of this interview he was a member of the Colorado Commission on Higher Education and was in private practice with his partner, Dan Winograd, (CC class of 1970).

  • Thumbnail for Zagoras, Maro K.
    Zagoras, Maro K. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Maro K. Zagoras (CC class of 1989) was born December 23, 1966, in Waukegan, Illinois. She enrolled at Colorado College in the fall of 1985 and graduated with a B.A. in political science. While at Colorado College, Zagoras served as a Resident Assistant in Slocum, as Circle K president, and on an advisory board for leadership, volunteerism and community service and helped establish a community service center at Colorado College. She also served as senior class president during the 1988-89 academic year. She describes the faculty, students and administrators, and reflects on campus life in the 1980’s.

  • Thumbnail for Winograd, Daniel Mark
    Winograd, Daniel Mark by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Daniel Winograd (CC class of 1970) grew up in Greeley, Colorado, and entered Colorado College in 1966 as a Boettcher Foundation scholar. Upon graduating from Colorado College, he attended the University of Chicago Law School, and graduated in 1973. He accepted a position as an associate attorney with Elson, Lassers and Wolff in Chicago from 1973 to 1978. In September of 1978, he moved to Colorado Springs and opened an office as a solo practitioner. At the time of this interview he was in partnership with J. Tyler Makepeace (CC class of 1969).

  • Thumbnail for Wilson, Ruth E. Phillips
    Wilson, Ruth E. Phillips by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Ruth Wilson is a Colorado native who attended Colorado College from 1947 to 1949 as a trustee scholar from Colorado Springs High School. As a student, she also worked part-time in the Registrar's office in Cutler Hall from 1947 to 1948, and in the Alumni office from 1948 to 1949. She was a homemaker from 1949 until April of 1974, when she reentered the workforce, working for the Alumni Office and the Development Office in various capacities at Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Lindeman, Elizabeth Van Valkenburgh
    Lindeman, Elizabeth Van Valkenburgh by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Elizabeth Van Valkenburgh Lindeman (CC class of 1946) describes her perspective as a student during the turbulent and unsettled years of World War II. While a student at Colorado College, Elizabeth Lindeman was a psychology major, a member of Gamma Phi Beta, president of the Associated Women Students, a member of the Quadrangle Association, the Joint Student/Faculty Emergency Council, and numerous other college activities.

  • Thumbnail for Mashburn, Mary Gaston
    Mashburn, Mary Gaston by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Mary G. Mashburn (CC class of 1983) graduated with a major in political economy. She was active in student publications: editor of the Catalalyst, 1980-1981; and editor of the Critique, 1981-1982. Ms. Mashburn's interview focuses on student life at Colorado College during the 1980's.

  • Thumbnail for Haughey, Mary Gates
    Haughey, Mary Gates by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Mary's family came to the Craig area over the mountains in a covered wagon to homestead on Black Mountain in 1911 when she was eight. She had three brothers and the family lived in a two bedroom log cabin. She talks about: living conditions, winter cold and snow, cooking, washing clothes, making clothing, yearly trips to town, rural schools, play, and home remedies. Mary attended high school in Craig and describes school activities. She taught in rural schools for five years after graduating from high school in 1921. Mary lived at the school or with nearby families. She talks about: the schools, students, snowstorms, and homesteading. Mary married, Clarence Haughey, at twenty-two, and they lived in various places in Moffat County. They had four children. Mary talks about her family's interest in politics (women were allowed to vote in 1920). She was the Deputy County Clerk when her husband died at age fifty-one. She later won election to be the County Clerk and served sixteen years. Mary was a quilter. Mary died in 2003.

  • Thumbnail for Honnen, Edward H.
    Honnen, Edward H. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Edward H. Honnen was born in Pueblo, Colorado on April 17, 1899, and grew up in Colorado Springs. In the midterm of 1917, he entered Colorado College, where he excelled in three sports: basketball, track, and especially football, for which he was named the Rocky Mountain Conference's All Conference Tackle. When his father died in 1920, Honnen assumed control of the family's construction business. Over the years, he became a highly successful general contractor, involved in many important regional projects such as the building of Ft. Carson, Peterson Field, and various aspects of the Denver and Colorado Springs water systems. Around 1949, he became President of the McCoy Caterpillar Company, until his retirement in 1965, when he pursued team roping in the Old Timer's Rodeo Circuit. He is a member of the Cowboy Hall of Fame and the Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame. His many philanthropies have included: Colorado College Ice Rink, the donation of Western Art to the Fine Arts Center, and the Orchid House at the Denver Botanical Gardens. From 1946 to 1950, he served as a Colorado College Alumni Trustee and then as a Charter Trustee from 1960-1983. He received two Honorary Degrees from Colorado College, the first in 1960 and another in 1983. His autobiography, Tally Ho, contains further details of his life and many accomplishments.

  • Thumbnail for Werner, Ray O.
    Werner, Ray O. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Ray O. Werner taught in the Colorado College Economics Department from 1948 until his retirement in 1987, giving him one of the longest tenures of any faculty member in the history of the college. Born in Edgar, Nebraska in 1922, Werner received his A.B. at Hastings College in 1942, his M.A. in 1947, and his Ph.D. in 1960, both from the University of Nebraska. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II, and as an Army and Air Force Reservist for many years thereafter. Not only was he chairman of the Colorado College Department of Business Administration and Economics from 1956 through 1977, but he also served the college on numerous committees, including the Athletics Board from 1960 to 1982. He was a founder of the college's chapter of Pi Gamma Mu, and co-founder of Blue Key. Among his many contributions to the Colorado Springs community, Werner has served as president of the United Way, president of the Chamber of Commerce, and member of the Board of Directors of the Colorado Springs National Bank, United Bank of Colorado Springs. The recipient of several awards for outstanding teaching, Professor Werner also contributed to many publications in the field of economics, notably as editor of the Legal Developments in Marketing section of the Journal of Marketing.

  • Thumbnail for Eberle, Janet Mortimer
    Eberle, Janet Mortimer by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Janet was born in Kersey, Colorado on February 11, 1911. She came to the Craig area in 1918 with her parents, as an only child. They lived on her grandfather's ranch on Little Bear, for three years. They moved to various rural schools where her mother taught and her father helped at the school and worked at odd jobs. Then they filed on a homestead in 1925 and Janet's mother continued to teach in rural schools. Janet talks about: women being able to support themselves, homestead work, home schooling, clothing, puberty, play as a "tomboy", and play with sleds and skis. Janet describes: the homestead cabin, cooking, food preservation, sleeping with quilts and flat irons, lack of illness, health concerns in her rural community, death of neighbor from self abortion, and care of the deceased. She talks about: Craig high school activities, college, and her own teaching in rural schools. She married Ernest at twenty-six and had two children in her mid-thirties. Their home was in Hamilton on a ranch, where she served as census enumerator and Moffat County Superintendent of Schools.

  • Thumbnail for Jones, Jean Armstrong and Jones, Gerald L.
    Jones, Jean Armstrong and Jones, Gerald L. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Jean Armstrong Jones (CC class of 1944) graduated with a B. A. degree in English and her husband, Gerald L. Jones, a member of the Naval V-12 Unit, was assigned to Colorado College from 1943-1945. Jean Armstrong Jones has a particularly long association with the college. Both of her parents graduated from Colorado College in 1899. Her father, Willis R. Armstrong, for whom Armstrong Hall is named, served as a trustee of the college from 1903 until 1956, and numerous members of her family also attended Colorado College. Gerald Jones has been associated with the Colorado Springs National Bank since 1946. Jean Jones provides memories of her childhood in Colorado Springs. Both Mr. and Mrs. Jones describe life on campus during World War II.

  • Thumbnail for Rector, Stella B. LaForce
    Rector, Stella B. LaForce by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Stella was born in Oak Creek, Colorado and grew up near McCoy, Colorado on a ranch until she was six years old when her father died. She had five siblings. Stella's mother moved the family to Glenwood Springs so that she could work and her children could finish high school. The children spent summers on the ranch. She talks about: homemade clothing, working during the depression, and summers on the ranch. Stella married Jay Rector and traveled with him to construction jobs. Later they worked on the Kirk ranch, and finally on her husband's father's ranch, both near Rangely. She talks about her husband's mother, who had ten children and first came to the area in 1898 at six years old. Stella describes: washing clothes, cooking for family and extra help, gardening, sewing, roundup, and needlework. The ranch was twenty miles from town, and she saw few neighbors. She liked the chores outside, but not the cooking. She had four children, and talks about her daughter's education, etc. Stella describes the town library, 4H, and women's clubs. Stella died in 1991.

  • Thumbnail for Kutsche, Paul
    Kutsche, Paul by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Paul Kutsche, "Buzz," was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan on January 3, 1927. He received a B.A. from Harvard College in 1949; his M.A. in Anthropology from the University of Michigan in 1955; and his Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1961. Kutsche came to Colorado College in the fall of 1959 as an assistant professor of sociology and anthropology. He is credited with creating a separate Anthropology Department in 1964. He was named professor in 1970, and finally professor emeritus in 1993. Author of many articles in professional journals, he also co-authored, with John Van Ness, a book entitled Canones. He has been an active advocate of homosexual rights in Colorado and around the country.

  • Thumbnail for Calvert, William Mark
    Calvert, William Mark by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    William M. Calvert (CC class of 1944) attended Colorado College from 1940 to 1943, and received his Bachelor of Arts in political science in absentia in 1944. When the Navy V-12 unit arrived on the Colorado College campus in 1942, Calvert automatically became a member, for he had enlisted in the Naval Reserves shortly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. He served in the Pacific Theater in World War II. Calvert entered the University of Colorado School of Law in 1946, and received his Juris Doctorate in 1948. In 1961, he was elected District Judge, and he held that post until his retirement in 1981. Judge Calvert was a member of the Saturday Knights, the prestigious Colorado Springs hiking club.

  • Thumbnail for Hoth, Jayne White
    Hoth, Jayne White by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Jayne was born at home in Sunbeam, Colorado in 1918. Her grandmother, Sarah Farrell, came to the Sunbeam area to homestead as a single woman in 1887 from Ohio. She came at age thirty-two because she hadn't married and was considered a failure. She married a cowboy in 1890. Sarah was a practical nurse and delivered many babies in this remote area. Jayne tells stories of her grandmother and mother living on the homestead: home remedies, dances, food, outside work, and isolation in the winter. Jayne talks about her own childhood as a "tomboy." When she started school she went to a rural school and then moved to Denver to live with her grandparents. She returned to the Maybell area in 1944 at age twenty-six with one son and divorced. She married again to Carl E. "Mike" Hoth, and lived on ranches where her husband worked. Jayne cooked for the ranch hands and also worked outside with her husband. They had three children. Jayne talks about: ranch life, hobbies, and clubs. Jayne died in 1989.

  • Thumbnail for Spence, Jennie Mary Brown
    Spence, Jennie Mary Brown by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Jennie was born in 1897. Her parents came to the Meeker area in 1898 in a covered wagon. Her father began teaching in rural schools around the Meeker area until they moved to Meeker and had a store. They also started a homestead on Flag Creek. Jennie tells many stories about her mother who: made hats, ran the store, sewed clothes, had boarders, was Dr. French's nurse, took care of other people's children, made funeral shrouds, and "laid out people." Jennie tells stories about her childhood: play, chores, basketball, piano, and riding horses. She taught school for three years before she married. Jennie describes: home remedies, puberty, births of children, and women who died in childbirth. She and her husband, Joe Spence, lived on several ranches and she describes the living conditions in the early years: coal oil lights, carrying water, milking cows, making butter, and making soap. She went on roundup with her husband from September to November. They had two children. She describes a typical day in the summer. Jennie began teaching again after her children left home. Jennie enjoyed painting. Jennie died in 1995.

  • Thumbnail for Warren, Doris Stephenson
    Warren, Doris Stephenson by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Doris's mother was born on the trip west in a covered wagon train from Indiana. Doris's grandparents came to the Meeker area in 1889 to homestead on Flag Creek. Her grandmother, Minirva Wilson, told her about the trip west. Doris describes: the homestead cabin, the reservoir, home remedies, and cooking. Doris's mother, Goldie May Stephenson, went to college in Boulder at the University, against her father's wishes, and Doris relates stories of her experiences. She returned to Meeker to teach in the Coal Creek School and in Meeker. Goldie May stopped teaching when her children were born, but went back because of the Great Depression. She was also elected Rio Blanco County Superintendent of Schools, but had to resign because she was pregnant. Goldie May tended to sick people during the 1918 flu, and Doris relates her mother's experiences during that time. Doris grew up in Meeker. She didn't attend college because of lack of funds. She worked in the County Clerk's office, until she ran for County Treasurer and was elected, the first woman elected to that post. She talks about working women and working mothers.

  • Thumbnail for Powell, Ila Alma Bowman
    Powell, Ila Alma Bowman by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Ila's parents came to the Rangely area to homestead on Douglas Creek in 1908. Her mother made friends with Ute Indians who passed through the area hunting along the White River. As a child she remembers: caring for bum lambs, milking cows, irrigation, the garden, planting potatoes, clearing sage brush, making deer jerky, washing clothes, baking bread, ironing, and clothing (dresses). She remembers: home remedies, injuries, 1918 flu, and puberty. For fun they fished, rode horses, made horse tail ropes, went to dances, and visited with neighbors. She went to school in Utah, Rangely, and Grand Junction. She regrets quitting school in Junior High to get married (1927) to Lester Powell. She and her husband moved to Seattle, Washington for three years, but returned to homestead on Douglas Creek during the Depression. They had 10 children. They dug their own coal mine and helped build the school. Ila expresses attitudes towards: working mothers, birth control, children, and not having a career. Ila died in 2008.

  • Thumbnail for Parks, Nellie Warren
    Parks, Nellie Warren by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Nellie's parents came to Meeker in 1882 and she was born in 1893. She had four sisters and brothers. Their ranch was fourteen miles from Meeker. She remembers milking seventeen cows and selling the butter in Meeker, helping her father in the potato field and her mother in the kitchen, and loading hay with a buck rake (which is when they had to switch from wearing skirts to pants). Nellie remembers the visits of Ute Indians to their ranch looking for coffee and sugar. She talks about the rural school in the summer and the teacher who boarded with them. Nellie describes: home remedies, family injuries, the flu of 1918, and diseases. As a teenager she worked at home and did some work for other families until she married. When she married, she and her husband, George Parks, worked on several ranches and raised six children. She worked outside and inside and talks about those activities. She describes a difficult childbirth and a "damaged" child because of birthing conditions. She talks about: early dresses, later clothing, and caring for her children. Nellie died in 1985.

  • Thumbnail for Service, Eleanor Rugler
    Service, Eleanor Rugler by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Eleanor was teaching school in Missouri and wanted to make more money by moving west. She came to the Pagoda School in 1927 at nineteen. She boarded with a family, but saw few other people except at holidays and dances. They traveled in the winter by sled. She taught in rural schools at Lime Kiln near Meeker, Axial and Hamilton between Meeker and Craig, and in the Meeker schools. Eleanor completed two years of college and many extension courses. She tells many stories of her years in rural schools: taking her breast fed child with her, her school pet deer, making teaching materials, driving to the schools from Meeker in the winter, becoming a foster parent for two of her students. She married a rancher, James F. Service, but wanted to continue to teach while she raised her children. She had three children and two foster children. Eleanor died in 1985.

  • Thumbnail for Sweeney, June Marion O'Connell
    Sweeney, June Marion O'Connell by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    June was born in Leadville, Colorado in 1904. She graduated from Colorado State College of Education in Greeley and accepted a job in Maybell in 1925(?). She lived in the motel and met a local cowboy, Henry Sweeney, who became her husband. They lived on the land his father had homesteaded in 1896. She tells stories about her trip to Maybell, and her year of teaching. She talks about her marriage, honeymoon, and new home seven miles south of Lay. June talks about: her pregnancies, riding a horse, teaching in rural schools, teaching in Craig, serving as the Moffat County School Superintendent. Her husband did the housework when she was too busy. June relates stories of her mother-in-law, who came from Ireland. She was a maid in Meeker when she met Pat Sweeney and they homesteaded in Lay. She talks the illness of one adult son. June died in 1987.

  • Thumbnail for Masonic lodges
    Masonic lodges by Shobe, J.E. , Musser, Belle McCoy

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 10, Masonic lodges include: 1 page from The Colorado Odd Fellow with official directory listings; 1 booklet “Constitution and By-laws of Monte Rosa Rebekah Lodge No. 4, I. O. O. F.”; 1 b&w photo: “Mrs. George W. Musser, Past Noble Grand of Monte Rosa Rebekah Lodge”; 1 16-page, handwritten document, dated July 29, 1901, titled “A Brief History of Monte Rosa Rebekah Lodge No. 4,” signed by Belle McCoy Musser; 1 3-page, typewritten document, dated August 3, 1901, detailing the history of I. O. O. F. Lodge No. 38, signed by J. E. Shobe, Secretary.

  • Thumbnail for William A. Platt family
    William A. Platt family by Platt, William Alexander

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 26, William A. Platt family include: 2 b&w photos: “Julia M. Hankinson Platt” “William Alexander Platt”; 1 8-page, handwritten letter, dated August 3, 1901, addressed “To any descendants of mine who may be alive in 2001, Greeting:” signed by William Alexander Platt.