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Browsing 435 results for facet Geographic with value of Colorado.
  • Thumbnail for Stewart, Marka Webb
    Stewart, Marka Webb by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Varina Margaret “Marka” Webb was born in Colorado Springs on May 13, 1905, the eldest of five children of Dr. Gerald Bertram Webb, a noted physician, and Varina Howell Davis Webb, the granddaughter of Jefferson Davis. Marka graduated from Oldfield School in Glencoe, Maryland, in 1924, and married Colorado Springs attorney Gerald W. Bennett, on January 7, 1926. They were the parents of two sons, Gerald and Charles, before Mr. Bennett's untimely death in 1936. As a young widow, Marka served as a companion to her father until his own death in 1948. In 1956, she married John Wolcott Stewart, son of Philip B. Stewart, longtime trustee of Colorado College. Her numerous community interests included the Webb-Waring Lung Institute, Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, Symphony Orchestra and Opera Festival, and the Woman's Educational Society.

  • Thumbnail for Zagoras, Maro K.
    Zagoras, Maro K. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Maro K. Zagoras (CC class of 1989) was born December 23, 1966, in Waukegan, Illinois. She enrolled at Colorado College in the fall of 1985 and graduated with a B.A. in political science. While at Colorado College, Zagoras served as a Resident Assistant in Slocum, as Circle K president, and on an advisory board for leadership, volunteerism and community service and helped establish a community service center at Colorado College. She also served as senior class president during the 1988-89 academic year. She describes the faculty, students and administrators, and reflects on campus life in the 1980’s.

  • Thumbnail for Boucher, Paul Edward
    Boucher, Paul Edward by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Boucher (CC class of 1918), Department of Physics, came to Colorado College as a student in 1915. He describes the lab facilities in Palmer Hall and his work with wireless radios and soldiers on campus during WWI. After serving one year in the Army in the Signal Corps, Boucher went to graduate school, and then returned to CC to teach physics from 1921 to 1924. Following a year as instructor at Rice University, he came back to Colorado College in 1925 and taught until his retirement in 1961. Professor Boucher is especially well known for his work in the field of photography. Professor Boucher talks about the Depression's effect on the College, salary cuts, building of Shove Chapel, Saturday Knights, Manly Ormes, Arthur Blakely, and Earl Bryson. He also discusses the publishing of his photography books and photographic travel.

  • Thumbnail for Jackson, Helen
    Jackson, Helen by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Helen Jackson, born in Colorado Springs in 1890, gave this interview at the age of 87. Her father, William Sharpless Jackson, was a close associate of General Palmer, and he served on the Colorado College Board of Trustees between 1874 and 1917. Her brother, William S. Jackson, Jr., served as a trustee for 50 years between 1925 and 1975. One of seven children, Miss Jackson was the daughter of William S. Jackson, Sr.'s second wife, Helen Fisk Banfield, and a great-niece of his first wife, the writer Helen Hunt. Miss Jackson graduated from Cutler Academy in 1907, received her B.A. at Vassar in 1912, and an M.A. from Colorado College in 1915. She taught school for many years at the Dudley Road School in Massachusetts, before returning to Colorado Springs around 1942 to become custodian of the Jackson family home at 228 East Kiowa. When the home was torn down in 1961 and reconstructed at the Pioneer Museum, Miss Jackson became the interpreter of its history to thousands of museum visitors, especially area school children.

  • Thumbnail for Carter, Harvey L.
    Carter, Harvey L. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Carter joined the faculty in the Department of History at Colorado College in 1945. Carter talks about people who were at the college during that time (Hershey, Abbott, Malone, Worner). Many of the students were WWII veterans. Because faculty salaries were very low (highest salary was $3600), Carter organized the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter and worked with President Gill to draft salary ranks and faculty tenure policies. Carter talks about the effects of the McCarthy era on the Colorado College campus, and President's Gill's defense of those targeted. He resigned as History Department Chair in 1959. Carter was curator of the Hulbert Collection of Western Americana. He talks about his own writing: western fur trade, Hafen sketches of mountain men, Kit Carson, limerick writing, and his philosophy of teaching.

  • Thumbnail for Murray, Constance Postlethwaite and Greiner, Isabel Postlethwaite
    Murray, Constance Postlethwaite and Greiner, Isabel Postlethwaite by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Mrs. Constance Postlethwaite Murray and her sister, Mrs. Isabel Postlethwaite Greiner provide memories of their student days and their recollections of their father, William W. Postlethwaite, who served as General Palmer's personal secretary, and then as treasurer of Colorado College from 1911 to 1940 and as curator of the Colorado College museum from 1940 until his death in 1955. Mrs. Murray (CC class of 1932) served as an alumni trustee from 1954 to 1957. Mrs. Greiner (CC class of 1925) completed her Colorado College studies as a special student at the affiliated Academy of Fine Arts.

  • Thumbnail for Krutzke, Frank A.
    Krutzke, Frank A. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Krutzke was a member of the English department at Colorado College from 1939-1971. He talks about his impressions of professors Daehler, Ellis, McCue, Bramhall, Abbott, and Gilmore. Krutzke discusses life at Colorado College during World War II, including student Bert Stiles, a pilot in the war who wrote a well known book, Serenade to the Big Bird. He gives impressions of the administration after the war and his involvement with the formation of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter at Colorado College. He also discusses the changes that President Benezet brought to the College, the McCarthy era, Colorado College students from 1939 to the 1970s, and the Block Plan.

  • Thumbnail for McNary, Evaline C.
    McNary, Evaline C. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Evaline McNary arrived at Colorado College in 1934 as the dietician and eventually became the Director of Residence Halls. She describes the conditions of the residence halls upon her arrival - including an ice box and 1907 coal stove. She describes the formal meals in Bemis, social policies, men's housing and dining, Quonset huts for married veteran students, and co-ed dorms. From 1934 to 1976 she saw her responsibilities grow from 60 women in 2 residence halls to 1250 students in 17 halls, plus the management of 55 to 60 rental units.

  • Thumbnail for Madruga, Herving
    Madruga, Herving by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Herving Madruga, a native of Cuba, joined the Colorado College Romance Languages faculty in 1958. He received his B.A. (1952) and M.A. (1954) from Harvard University, a Certificat de Phonetique from the University of Paris, France in 1954; and his Ph.D. from the University of Colorado in 1965. Professor Madruga was one of the founding faculty and the early director of the Program in Comparative Literature at Colorado College. He is also known for his French theater productions. He retired in 1994.

  • Thumbnail for Lindeman, Elizabeth Van Valkenburgh
    Lindeman, Elizabeth Van Valkenburgh by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Elizabeth Van Valkenburgh Lindeman (CC class of 1946) describes her perspective as a student during the turbulent and unsettled years of World War II. While a student at Colorado College, Elizabeth Lindeman was a psychology major, a member of Gamma Phi Beta, president of the Associated Women Students, a member of the Quadrangle Association, the Joint Student/Faculty Emergency Council, and numerous other college activities.

  • Thumbnail for Honnen, Edward H.
    Honnen, Edward H. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Edward H. Honnen was born in Pueblo, Colorado on April 17, 1899, and grew up in Colorado Springs. In the midterm of 1917, he entered Colorado College, where he excelled in three sports: basketball, track, and especially football, for which he was named the Rocky Mountain Conference's All Conference Tackle. When his father died in 1920, Honnen assumed control of the family's construction business. Over the years, he became a highly successful general contractor, involved in many important regional projects such as the building of Ft. Carson, Peterson Field, and various aspects of the Denver and Colorado Springs water systems. Around 1949, he became President of the McCoy Caterpillar Company, until his retirement in 1965, when he pursued team roping in the Old Timer's Rodeo Circuit. He is a member of the Cowboy Hall of Fame and the Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame. His many philanthropies have included: Colorado College Ice Rink, the donation of Western Art to the Fine Arts Center, and the Orchid House at the Denver Botanical Gardens. From 1946 to 1950, he served as a Colorado College Alumni Trustee and then as a Charter Trustee from 1960-1983. He received two Honorary Degrees from Colorado College, the first in 1960 and another in 1983. His autobiography, Tally Ho, contains further details of his life and many accomplishments.

  • Thumbnail for Kirby, Ruby Lucile Rector
    Kirby, Ruby Lucile Rector by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Ruby Kirby's parents (sister is Leona Rector Hinricks) came to the Rangely area in 1898-99. They had three children, Ruby (born in 1902), Leona, and a son. Ruby talks about Ute Indians who visited the ranch. And she describes: home remedies, chores, play, and riding horses. The children had tutors at home and also spent winters in Grand Junction for school. Ruby describes activities at the ranch during their teenage years: house work, horses, picnics, dances, and the family band. She and her sister went to Western State College. Ruby worked in San Francisco for three years in 1927 and then returned home. She married Russel Dare in 1936, but he was shot in front of the Rangely store by a "squatter" when she was eight months pregnant. After having her daughter, she soon married Albert Kirby, a local rancher. They continued to ranch in the area until Albert died two years prior to this interview, but Ruby's daughter and family live on the ranch and she continues to move between summer and winter ranches. Ruby died in 1995.

  • Thumbnail for Corley, Fern Pring
    Corley, Fern Pring by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Fern Pring Corley came to Colorado Springs in 1907, attending Garfield Elementary School and Colorado Springs High School. Corley (CC class of 1922) majored in chemistry. Her father, William J. Pring, was a pioneer rancher in the Pikes Peak region, and her husband's father, Mr. W. D. Corley, built the Corley Mountain Highway, now called the Gold Camp Road, on the roadbed of the old Short Line Railroad to Cripple Creek. Mrs. Corley describes student life at Colorado College including tuition, the Bruin Inn, student jobs, football, women's sports, freshman hazing, pranks, campus buildings, literary societies and Monument Valley Park. Included in the interview are descriptions of her early childhood in Colorado Springs, her family's early history in the area, and her husband's businesses.

  • Thumbnail for Deaver, Velma Burdick
    Deaver, Velma Burdick by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Velma's parents came to the Meeker area in1896 where she was born December 31, 1901. Her mother had eleven children and Velma was the oldest girl. They lived on ranches where her father worked. She remembers: walking a mile to school in the winter, inside chores, outside chores, haying, care for animals, clothing, play, puberty, Christmas, and the Mormon religion in her family. She talks about her mother's births at home. Velma gives details about: washing and ironing, attending rural schools, and high school in Meeker. She went to Western State College for 2 1/2 years and then began teaching. She continued college during the summers. Velma married Hoyt Deaver at twenty-five and continued teaching while her husband worked on ranches and in coal mines. They lived in Rangely and Craig and had one child. She talks about enjoying her teaching career. Velma died in 1999.

  • Thumbnail for Hoth, Jayne White
    Hoth, Jayne White by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Jayne was born at home in Sunbeam, Colorado in 1918. Her grandmother, Sarah Farrell, came to the Sunbeam area to homestead as a single woman in 1887 from Ohio. She came at age thirty-two because she hadn't married and was considered a failure. She married a cowboy in 1890. Sarah was a practical nurse and delivered many babies in this remote area. Jayne tells stories of her grandmother and mother living on the homestead: home remedies, dances, food, outside work, and isolation in the winter. Jayne talks about her own childhood as a "tomboy." When she started school she went to a rural school and then moved to Denver to live with her grandparents. She returned to the Maybell area in 1944 at age twenty-six with one son and divorced. She married again to Carl E. "Mike" Hoth, and lived on ranches where her husband worked. Jayne cooked for the ranch hands and also worked outside with her husband. They had three children. Jayne talks about: ranch life, hobbies, and clubs. Jayne died in 1989.

  • Thumbnail for Campbell, Esther Anderson (Chandler)
    Campbell, Esther Anderson (Chandler) by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Esther was born in Harmony, Minnesota in 1899. She came to teach in the Skull Creek School from Denver when she was twenty-two. She boarded with a family who lived near the school. She soon married a local cowboy, Duard Campbell, and moved into his mother's homestead dugout cabin, which she describes. She continued teaching until retirement. They later moved to Brown's Park and raised cattle. Esther had one child who lived in Denver with her mother until he was school age because she had to teach. She talks about: hard winters, living conditions, social gatherings, school programs, isolated rural schools, the Home Demonstration Club, Freddie Blevins, June Sweeney, her husband's home duties, and Ute Indians. Esther died in 1995.

  • Thumbnail for Caunt, Kay Lynn Niederhut
    Caunt, Kay Lynn Niederhut by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Kay Niederhut Caunt (CC class of 1972) came to Colorado College from her home in Denver, Colorado, and graduated with a B.A. in history. Her interview focuses on campus life as a married student, campus attitudes toward the Vietnam War, and her early involvement in politics. She was a state legislative candidate in 1974, a member of the Colorado Democratic Party's executive committee and rules committee and worked with the Colorado Springs-El Paso County CETA Manpower Planning Council.

  • Thumbnail for Chrisler, Ethel La Kamp
    Chrisler, Ethel La Kamp by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Ethel's father came to the White River area in 1883 and her mother arrived in 1900 from Iowa for her health. Ethel was born in 1904 and grew up on ranches on the White River. She talks about: household chores, outdoor chores, hard winters; transportation; rural school; flu of 1918; home remedies; clothing; community life. She worked on a ranch after eighth grade until attending business college at nineteen. She married Tim Chrisler at twenty-two and lived on various ranches where her husband worked. They had two children. She talks about: coal/wood stoves, gas lamps, food storage, quilting groups, and church. They later owned a motel in Meeker. Ethel died in 1995.

  • Thumbnail for Rawlinson, Hilda M. Shelton Fickle
    Rawlinson, Hilda M. Shelton Fickle by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Hilda's parents homesteaded in Dry Lake, fifteen miles south of Maybell in 1916. They lived in a rented house, a tent, and a dugout before they built the homestead. They also homesteaded a second time on Wolf Mountain, further south on Price Creek. Hilda talks about: grubbing sage brush, building the school, homeschooling, description of the dugout, and hauling water. She describes the 1918 flu, death, and burial. She talks about the outside work she did as the oldest girl: building fence, herding cows, breaking horses, plowing fields, mowing and pitching hay. She also describes: types of clothing, transportation, play, dances in Maybell, doctors, pregnancy, births, medical issues, and home remedies. She worked as a maternity helper from age fifteen to eighteen, and then worked at St. Mary's Hospital in Grand Junction until she married at age twenty. They went to California to work on a fruit farm until the depression and then returned to Price Creek to buy a ranch. She talks about difficult years with lack of water, loss of animals, and Home Demonstration clubs. They had one child. Hilda enjoyed painting with oils. Hilda died in 2001.

  • Thumbnail for Jones, Margaret Tagert
    Jones, Margaret Tagert by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Margaret's mother, Fannie Wear, came to northwestern Colorado in about 1889, first settling at Juniper Springs, near the Lay stockade. Margaret talks about: her mother's experience with the river (Bear/Yampa), supply trips to Wyoming, Ute Indians, dangerous pregnancies and births, and birth control. Margaret talks about her life in Meeker. She was the only girl with four brothers and her mother was in poor health. She did many of the household chores and took care of her younger brother. Her older brothers had no responsibilities at home, but worked on ranches from age twelve on. Margaret describes life on the homestead where they lived in the summer. She talks about: play, cooking, school, working, puberty - herself and earlier generations, and travel outside northwestern Colorado. She also talks about serious illness and other medical issues. She describes: attitudes towards divorce, working married women, and the advantages of the homemaker role. Margaret earned a B.S. at Colo. State Univ. and taught high school in Craig for a year before marrying Hugh A Jones in Craig. She had two daughters. Margaret died in 1999.

  • Thumbnail for Lyons, Iris Self
    Lyons, Iris Self by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Iris's parents came from Georgia to Spring Gulch, two miles north of Williams Fork in Moffat County in 1914 with seven children. Iris was born in 1905. The nearest neighbor was 5 miles away. Her father had a college education and taught at the Wattle Creek school and was also a preacher. Her mother found life much harder than in Georgia. Iris describes life on the homestead: garden, cows, wheat, deer, hogs, clothing, play, puberty, and the one room school. For high school the children stayed in a rented house in Craig while their parents stayed on the ranch. Iris was interested in science and wanted to be a nurse. She went to Denver General Hospital for nurses training after high school. She describes some early nursing techniques and home remedies. Iris came home to marry Wayne Lyons and they lived on the Lyon's family homestead in Breeze Basin in 1930 and had four children. She worked as a nurse when she was needed. At one point they would have closed the Hayden hospital if not for her. Later she worked at the Craig hospital. Iris died in 1999.

  • Thumbnail for Savage, Rosamay Hodges
    Savage, Rosamay Hodges by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Rosamay was born in 1898 on a ranch near Juniper Springs. Her mother, Bell, lived as a young woman in Maybell and the town may have been named after her and her sister, May. Rosamay's father was the foreman on the K-Diamond Ranch and there were no nearby neighbors. She and her sister rode horses and played with dolls. After her father died, they moved to Maybell where her mother owned a drugstore. She describes visiting an Indian camp at Cross Mountain. Rosamay also talks about: clothing for school, riding, home remedies, and dances. Her education ended after one year in high school for financial reasons. She later went to business college and worked for three years before marrying. Her husband, George Savage, was the chief of police in Boulder, Colorado. When he retired they bought a ranch near Rangely and she joined the Home Demonstration Club. She had no children. She enjoyed textile painting and quilting. Rosamay died in 1993.

  • Thumbnail for James, Minnie Louise Eberle
    James, Minnie Louise Eberle by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Minnie came to Craig in 1910 with her family when she was fourteen. They lived on a ranch near Craig until they moved to their homestead south of Craig. There were nine children and Minnie was the oldest girl, responsible for many of the household and babysitting chores. She talks about: hauling water from the river, cooking on the coal stove, the cattle/sheep wars, clothing, play, school, and taking care of her sick mother. Minnie boarded in town for high school and talks about activities. She had one year of college and took the state teacher's exam. She then taught in a rural school but didn't like teaching. Minnie moved to California with a friend and went to a business college. She worked as a secretary/bookkeeper for a time and then returned to Craig in 1941. She married Lewis James and moved to the James ranch. Her husband died a year and a half later of pneumonia. She moved back into Craig and worked as a secretary/bookkeeper until retirement. Minnie died in 1989.

  • Thumbnail for Kenney, Glee Cloward
    Kenney, Glee Cloward by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    When she was eight years old, Glee came to the Rangely area with her father and two siblings (1921?). Her mother had just died of diabetes. Her father had worked in the coal mines in Winterquarters, Utah where Glee was born in 1913. Her father leased a ranch near Rangely where he felt he could take better care of the three children. She describes: household chores, winter activities, dances, school, puberty, and clothing. Glee also describes the town of Rangely and what staples her family bought at the one store. She talks about their food sources: meat from cows, and hunting. Glee married Lester Kenney at seventeen and lived on several ranches owned by her husband's father in the Rangely area. She had three children and went to Vernal, Utah and Grand Junction, Colorado for their births. She describes the small school in Rangely (twelve children) that had teachers who boarded with local families. Glee died in 2000.

  • Thumbnail for Manitou, Colorado
    Manitou, Colorado by Kriger, John W. , Frowine, Aileen Nutten

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 11, Manitou, Colorado include: 1 b&w photo: “Mexican and Indian Museum, Manitou, Colo.”; 1 hand-tinted photo: “The Cliff House and Soda Springs, Manitou, Colo.”; 1 hand-tinted photo: “Manitou, Colo. about 1900”; 1 b&w photo: “Interior of A. M. Nilson’s Grocery Store, 108 Canon Ave.”; 1 reprinted b&w photo, a panoramic view of Manitou, Colo.; 1 b&w photo: “Aileen Nutten Frowine”; 1 9-page, handwritten letter, dated August 4, 1901, signed by Aileen Nutten Frowine; 1 envelope marked “Manitou Tourist Season, 1901”; 1 8-page, handwritten document, undated, titled “Some Phases of the Government of the Town of Manitou in the year 1901” signed by John W. Kriger, Town Attorney; 2 issues of the Manitou Springs Journal, dated June 20, 1901 and July 30, 1901; 1 printed poster “The Growth of the Cliff House in 25 Years.”