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  • Thumbnail for Riley, Gresham
    Riley, Gresham by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Gresham Riley was born in Jackson, Mississippi on June 27, 1938. He graduated magna cum laude with a B.A. from Baylor University in 1960. After a year in Germany as a Fulbright scholar, he went on to get his M.A. in 1963, and his Ph.D. in 1965 in philosophy, from Yale University, where he focused on the works of the philosopher, C. S. Peirce. He joined the faculty of New College in Florida in 1965, but soon entered the ranks of its administration as acting provost in 1973, and then as provost from 1973 to 1975. From 1975 through 1981, he was the dean of the faculty of Arts and Sciences at the University of Richmond in Virginia. Riley served as Colorado College’s tenth president from June 1980 until June 1992. His most notable accomplishments at Colorado College include a successful capital campaign drive from 1984 through 1989, raising $49.6 million, which resulted in the construction of two major campus buildings, the Worner Student Center, and the Barnes Science Center.

  • Thumbnail for Reinitz, Neale R.
    Reinitz, Neale R. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Neale Reinitz received a B.A. in English from the University of Wisconsin in 1947, an M.A. in English from Harvard in 1949 and his Ph.D. in English from University of California at Berkeley in 1958. Professor Reinitz was a member of the English department at Colorado College from 1953 until his retirement in 1991. His special interests include biking, hiking, rafting, wine, books, jazz, the Marx Brothers, cross-country skiing and photography.

  • Thumbnail for Gordon, Joseph Tulloch
    Gordon, Joseph Tulloch by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Born in St. Louis in 1930, Professor Gordon received his B.A. from St. Louis in 1955, a second B.A. from DePaul University in 1958, his M.A. from Colorado University in 1960 and a Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State University in 1967. A specialist in American literature, Professor Gordon came to Colorado College as assistant professor of English in 1964. He was promoted to associate professor in 1970 and to full professor in 1977. In 1970, he became both the creator and director of Colorado College's Southwest Studies Program, a position that he held most of the time until his retirement in 1994. One of his chief accomplishments was the establishment of the Colorado College Baca Campus in 1987. Joe Gordon was also an avid tennis player, skier and fly fisherman.

  • Thumbnail for Krutzke, Frank A.
    Krutzke, Frank A. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Krutzke was a member of the English department at Colorado College from 1939-1971. He talks about his impressions of professors Daehler, Ellis, McCue, Bramhall, Abbott, and Gilmore. Krutzke discusses life at Colorado College during World War II, including student Bert Stiles, a pilot in the war who wrote a well known book, Serenade to the Big Bird. He gives impressions of the administration after the war and his involvement with the formation of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter at Colorado College. He also discusses the changes that President Benezet brought to the College, the McCarthy era, Colorado College students from 1939 to the 1970s, and the Block Plan.

  • Thumbnail for Makepeace, J. Tyler
    Makepeace, J. Tyler by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936- , Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    John Tyler Makepeace (CC class of 1969) was born on October 25, 1947, in Waterbury, Connecticut. He attended Washington and Lee University for one year before transferring to Colorado College in 1966. After graduating with a B.A. in political science, he studied law at the University of Colorado and received his degree in 1972. From 1972 to 1977, Makepeace was senior deputy district attorney. From 1975 to 1977, he was also chief juvenile division district attorney. He was the founder of CHINS-UP in 1975 and an unsuccessful legislative candidate for District 18 in 1978. During the time of this interview he was a member of the Colorado Commission on Higher Education and was in private practice with his partner, Dan Winograd, (CC class of 1970).

  • Thumbnail for Joyce, Mary Barkalow Holt
    Joyce, Mary Barkalow Holt by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Mary Barkalow Joyce (CC class of 1938) came with her sister and widowed mother to Colorado College from California in 1934 when her mother was offered the position as Head Resident of Bemis Hall. As an entering freshman, Miss Barkalow was offered a job as a “hasher” in Bemis. She talks about her enjoyment of Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority; her professors, particularly her female professors as role models; her introduction to social work, which became her profession; campus social life; campus athletics; Murray’s Drug Store; classes; chapel attendance; and her career in social work. She compares her college experience to that of her granddaughters who attended Colorado College. Grace Berkley Brannon (CC class of 1927) contributes to this interview.

  • Thumbnail for Johns, Gilbert R.
    Johns, Gilbert R. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor of Psychology Gilbert R. Johns, who received his Ph.D. from the University of Indiana, came to Colorado College in 1962, following a teaching appointment at Ohio University. His specialties have been in sensory psychology and perception and the history of science and psychology. Professor Johns served as the Dean of the Colorado College Summer Session for 15 years, from 1965 to 1981. He was director of the Colorado Opera Festival from 1970 to 1978. From 1982 to 1992 he was critic at large for the Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph. He retired in 1996.

  • Thumbnail for Bryson, Arthur Earl
    Bryson, Arthur Earl by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Arthur Bryson was both a graduate (CC class of 1911) and an alumni trustee of Colorado College from 1948-1949. Following a 34-year career as an investment banker for Halsey Stewart and Company in Chicago, he retired in Colorado Springs in 1946, where he founded the Colorado Springs Charter Association, and the Springs Area Beautiful Association. His second wife was the former Dorothy Printup Hulbert Wing. During his time as a student at Colorado College, he was the editor of both The Tiger and The Nugget.

  • Thumbnail for McNary, Evaline C.
    McNary, Evaline C. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Evaline McNary arrived at Colorado College in 1934 as the dietician and eventually became the Director of Residence Halls. She describes the conditions of the residence halls upon her arrival - including an ice box and 1907 coal stove. She describes the formal meals in Bemis, social policies, men's housing and dining, Quonset huts for married veteran students, and co-ed dorms. From 1934 to 1976 she saw her responsibilities grow from 60 women in 2 residence halls to 1250 students in 17 halls, plus the management of 55 to 60 rental units.

  • Thumbnail for Mashburn, Mary Gaston
    Mashburn, Mary Gaston by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Mary G. Mashburn (CC class of 1983) graduated with a major in political economy. She was active in student publications: editor of the Catalalyst, 1980-1981; and editor of the Critique, 1981-1982. Ms. Mashburn's interview focuses on student life at Colorado College during the 1980's.

  • Thumbnail for Honnen, Edward H.
    Honnen, Edward H. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Edward H. Honnen was born in Pueblo, Colorado on April 17, 1899, and grew up in Colorado Springs. In the midterm of 1917, he entered Colorado College, where he excelled in three sports: basketball, track, and especially football, for which he was named the Rocky Mountain Conference's All Conference Tackle. When his father died in 1920, Honnen assumed control of the family's construction business. Over the years, he became a highly successful general contractor, involved in many important regional projects such as the building of Ft. Carson, Peterson Field, and various aspects of the Denver and Colorado Springs water systems. Around 1949, he became President of the McCoy Caterpillar Company, until his retirement in 1965, when he pursued team roping in the Old Timer's Rodeo Circuit. He is a member of the Cowboy Hall of Fame and the Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame. His many philanthropies have included: Colorado College Ice Rink, the donation of Western Art to the Fine Arts Center, and the Orchid House at the Denver Botanical Gardens. From 1946 to 1950, he served as a Colorado College Alumni Trustee and then as a Charter Trustee from 1960-1983. He received two Honorary Degrees from Colorado College, the first in 1960 and another in 1983. His autobiography, Tally Ho, contains further details of his life and many accomplishments.

  • Thumbnail for Jackson, Helen
    Jackson, Helen by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Helen Jackson, born in Colorado Springs in 1890, gave this interview at the age of 87. Her father, William Sharpless Jackson, was a close associate of General Palmer, and he served on the Colorado College Board of Trustees between 1874 and 1917. Her brother, William S. Jackson, Jr., served as a trustee for 50 years between 1925 and 1975. One of seven children, Miss Jackson was the daughter of William S. Jackson, Sr.'s second wife, Helen Fisk Banfield, and a great-niece of his first wife, the writer Helen Hunt. Miss Jackson graduated from Cutler Academy in 1907, received her B.A. at Vassar in 1912, and an M.A. from Colorado College in 1915. She taught school for many years at the Dudley Road School in Massachusetts, before returning to Colorado Springs around 1942 to become custodian of the Jackson family home at 228 East Kiowa. When the home was torn down in 1961 and reconstructed at the Pioneer Museum, Miss Jackson became the interpreter of its history to thousands of museum visitors, especially area school children.

  • Thumbnail for Mertz, Joseph Douglas
    Mertz, Joseph Douglas by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Joseph Douglas Mertz, a 1938 graduate of Ursinus College, received his law degree from Yale Law School in 1942. After two years teaching law at Dickinson Law School in Carlyle, Pennsylvania, he joined the Political Science Department at Colorado College in 1948, as assistant professor. He became associate professor and chairman of the department in 1953. He served as chairman until 1972 and retired in 1982. In addition to his faculty appointment, he also served the college as legal consultant from 1970 to 1982, and as general secretary from 1982 through 1983. He discusses the effects of McCarthyism during the Gill presidency, the growth of the Political Science Department, the effects of the Block Plan, and his work with President Worner and the Board of Trustees.

  • Thumbnail for Vickerman, Mary Carolyn Bloom
    Vickerman, Mary Carolyn Bloom by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Mary Carolyn Bloom Vickerman (CC class of 1932) was a native of Colorado Springs and her husband, Sam Vickerman (CC class of 1933), was a native of Westcliffe, Colorado. Mrs. Vickerman worked for the college almost from the time she became a student. As an undergraduate, she was an assistant at Coburn Library, as well as in a number of biology labs. In 1933 and 1934, she served as the night librarian at Coburn Library, and then from 1935 through 1940, was the secretary to the Colorado College Men's Athletic Department. In 1946, she began working at the Colorado College Bookstore in Lennox House, and in 1949 became the manager of the bookstore until her retirement in 1969. She was a life member of the Woman's Educational Society at Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Copeland, William D.
    Copeland, William D. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    William D. Copeland (CC class of 1919) served as instructor in English and secretary of the College from 1920 to 1935. He later served as president of Lincoln College in Lincoln, Illinois, vice president of Lake Forest College in Illinois, president of Rocky Mountain College in Billings, Montana, and pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in Polson, Montana. Copeland gives his impressions of Colorado College both before and after World War I, including memories of Presidents Slocum, Duniway, Mierow, and Davies. He talks about the effects of the Depression,"straight-laced CC" in the 1920's, athletic teams, fraternities, and the San Luis School. Faculty mentioned in the interview: Cajori, Schneider, Parsons, Blum, Parrish, Hills, Howe, Hulbert, Gilmore, Strieby, and Okey.

  • Thumbnail for Boyce, Wallace Campbell
    Boyce, Wallace Campbell by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Wallace Boyce was a faculty member in the Romance Languages Department at Colorado College from 1950 until his retirement in 1979. He received his B.A. from Williams, his M.A. from Middlebury, and his Ph.D. from Princeton in 1956. Before coming to Colorado College, Boyce served in the Army at Camp Carson in the 1940s, and was an intelligence officer in the European Theater in the Second World War. He also coached the Colorado College tennis team from 1953 to 1958, sang in the Colorado College choir for many years and was chairman of the Romance Languages department between 1958 and 1967.

  • Thumbnail for Kutsche, Paul
    Kutsche, Paul by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Paul Kutsche, "Buzz," was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan on January 3, 1927. He received a B.A. from Harvard College in 1949; his M.A. in Anthropology from the University of Michigan in 1955; and his Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1961. Kutsche came to Colorado College in the fall of 1959 as an assistant professor of sociology and anthropology. He is credited with creating a separate Anthropology Department in 1964. He was named professor in 1970, and finally professor emeritus in 1993. Author of many articles in professional journals, he also co-authored, with John Van Ness, a book entitled Canones. He has been an active advocate of homosexual rights in Colorado and around the country.

  • Thumbnail for Keener, Helen Lennox
    Keener, Helen Lennox by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Helen Lennox Keener graduated from Cutler Academy in 1913 and then from Colorado College (CC class of 1917). Mrs. Keener's family, the Lennox family, was one of the prominent pioneer families of the Pikes Peak region. With her husband, George Keener, she owned and operated for many years the Plaza Hotel (now Spencer Center) at the southwest corner of Cache la Poudre and Tejon streets. Her interview describes life at Cutler Academy and the academic and social life at Colorado College between 1913-1917.

  • Thumbnail for Sondermann, Judy
    Sondermann, Judy by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Judy Sondermann (CC class of 1981) is the daughter of the late Colorado College Professor Fred A. Sondermann. Judy graduated with a B.A. in psychology, and a Certificate of Education. She played women's varsity soccer for Colorado College for four years. In 1981, she was selected for a women's college soccer team that traveled to Europe for training and competition. In the 1981-82 season, Judy was an assistant coach of Colorado College's women's soccer team. She discusses growing up at Colorado College, campus life as a student, athletics, soccer, and her father, Fred Sondermann.

  • Thumbnail for Kenney, Glee Cloward
    Kenney, Glee Cloward by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    When she was eight years old, Glee came to the Rangely area with her father and two siblings (1921?). Her mother had just died of diabetes. Her father had worked in the coal mines in Winterquarters, Utah where Glee was born in 1913. Her father leased a ranch near Rangely where he felt he could take better care of the three children. She describes: household chores, winter activities, dances, school, puberty, and clothing. Glee also describes the town of Rangely and what staples her family bought at the one store. She talks about their food sources: meat from cows, and hunting. Glee married Lester Kenney at seventeen and lived on several ranches owned by her husband's father in the Rangely area. She had three children and went to Vernal, Utah and Grand Junction, Colorado for their births. She describes the small school in Rangely (twelve children) that had teachers who boarded with local families. Glee died in 2000.

  • Thumbnail for Levkulich, Mary Birovchak
    Levkulich, Mary Birovchak by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Mary came to the United States from Austria-Hungary when she was eighteen. She was born in 1896. She was the only child of six in her family who got to immigrate and tells of coming through Ellis Island by herself. She lived in New York City, and then moved to Minersville, Penn. where she met her husband, George Levkulich, also an immigrant. They moved wherever he could find work in coal mines. They moved to the Craig area in 1926 and found they had to buy 160 acres because all the homesteading land in Breeze Basin was taken. She tells many stories about: poor living conditions, learning to drive horses, raising 300 chickens, raising animals, growing crops, and butchering and storing meat. She describes "the shack" they first had on their farm and living conditions. Mary had seven children. They had several fire disasters with the chickens and crops. She talks about killing a rattlesnake, and getting rid of gophers. Mary talks about: baking bread in a coal stove, making clothes, and preserving food. She was afraid to visit her home in "Europe" because she would have to deal with the Russian Embassy. Mary died in 1990.

  • Thumbnail for Beidleman, Richard Gooch
    Beidleman, Richard Gooch by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    A prolific writer, a much sought-after speaker, and a highly respected professor, Richard Beidleman is one of Colorado College's most notable faculty members. He taught zoology from 1957-1968 and biology from 1968-1988. His research interests centered on the role of natural scientists in frontier America and Australia, and he helped author high school and junior high school biology textbooks, among approximately 250 other published works. The Colorado Springs community knows him best as a dedicated environmental activist who fought for many years for such causes as the preservation of the White House Ranch and the Garden of the Gods Park, the prevention of strip mining along Front Range quarries, and the successful League of Women Voters lawsuit against the City of Colorado Springs regarding the Palmer deeded parks. He served on the Colorado State Parks Board for eight years, including three and a half years as its chairman and succeeded, among other things, in obtaining Muehler Ranch as a state park. The Beidleman Environmental Center at Sondermann Park was established in his honor by the City of Colorado Springs.

  • Thumbnail for Oldland, Audrey Macy Ruckman
    Oldland, Audrey Macy Ruckman by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Audrey's mother came to visit her brother in Meeker at the age of fourteen in the early 1900s. She worked at the halfway house between Rifle and Meeker for several years. It was there she met her husband John Oldland, who was working as a guide for Teddy Roosevelt. They settled in Powell Park and had ten children. Audrey describes: her mother's cooking, sewing, the houses they lived in, children's play (dolls), and inside/outside work. She rode a horse five miles to school in the winter. When she was twelve years old she worked for neighbors, cooking and washing dishes to pay for her clothes and school books. She talks about a bad first menstruation experience. Audrey describes home remedies and the 1918 flu which struck her family. She attended beauty school in Grand Junction and worked for a short time in Meeker before marrying John Oldland. She describes beauty shop experiences. She had three children and talks about pregnancy and birthing experiences. The family lived on the Oldland ranch. She learned to fly and was the only woman at that time that flew in the area. Audrey died in 1993.

  • Thumbnail for Vaughan, Chloe Bunker
    Vaughan, Chloe Bunker by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Chloe came to Sunbeam, Colorado, from Illinois in 1926 to visit her sister. She met her husband, Minford, who had been born in Maybell. They were married in 1927 and lived for two years north of Craig while they bought cattle, sheep, and horses. Chloe had never ridden a horse. They moved to their homestead in Brown's Park on Zenobia Peak, seventy miles from Craig, and lived in a tent until they had the 20' X 30' cabin built. The logs, which they cut themselves, came from the mountain. Chloe describes the furniture, travel by horse and wagon, neighbors, medical problems, and home remedies. They moved their sheep from summer to winter ranges. Chloe describes one summer when her husband was ill and she "herded the sheep." She had her only child in Hayden where there was a hospital. Esther Campbell was her best friend and lived eight miles away. They communicated over a phone line strung by their husbands. Chloe describes the Home Demonstration Club. She also describes creative activities: horse hair ropes, leatherwork, horse blankets, knitting, crocheting, and quilting. Chloe died in 1990.

  • Thumbnail for Social life - Elizabeth Cass Goddard
    Social life - Elizabeth Cass Goddard by Goddard, Elizabeth Cass

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 13, Social life - Elizabeth Cass Goddard include: 1 b&w photo: “Elizabeth Cass Goddard (Mrs. Francis W. Goddard)”; 1 11-page, handwritten letter, dated July 27, 1901, addressed “My dear Twenty-First Century Women,” signed by Elizabeth Cass Goddard.