Colorado College Logo

Digital CC

Contacting Tutt Library

  • Circulation Desk: 389-6184
  • Reference Desk: 389-6662
  • Email | IM a Librarian

Colorado College's Institutional Repository


Browsing 435 results for facet Geographic with value of Colorado.
  • Thumbnail for Stewart, Marka Webb
    Stewart, Marka Webb by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Varina Margaret “Marka” Webb was born in Colorado Springs on May 13, 1905, the eldest of five children of Dr. Gerald Bertram Webb, a noted physician, and Varina Howell Davis Webb, the granddaughter of Jefferson Davis. Marka graduated from Oldfield School in Glencoe, Maryland, in 1924, and married Colorado Springs attorney Gerald W. Bennett, on January 7, 1926. They were the parents of two sons, Gerald and Charles, before Mr. Bennett's untimely death in 1936. As a young widow, Marka served as a companion to her father until his own death in 1948. In 1956, she married John Wolcott Stewart, son of Philip B. Stewart, longtime trustee of Colorado College. Her numerous community interests included the Webb-Waring Lung Institute, Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, Symphony Orchestra and Opera Festival, and the Woman's Educational Society.

  • Thumbnail for Drea, William Francis
    Drea, William Francis by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Dr. William Drea was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts on September 5, 1885. Dr. Drea arrived in Colorado Springs in 1917 as a tuberculosis patient, having been a faculty member of the Harvard Dental School before becoming ill. A dentist and a radiologist, he was a lecturer on X-ray in the physics department at Colorado College from 1922 through 1960. From 1928 through 1952 he was also Associate Research Director at the Colorado Foundation for Research in Tuberculosis. At the time of his interview, Dr. Drea was 91 and still a frequent visitor to Tutt Library. He was known for his lively conversation and keen sense of humor which made him a favorite among the library staff. He always wore a fresh cut flower in his coat lapel. He describes Colorado College faculty and administrators: Professor Cajori, Manly Ormes, Louise Kampf, Professor Tileston, Presidents Duniway and Mierow, along with memories of the Cragmor Sanitorium.

  • Thumbnail for Friedman, Bradley Alan
    Friedman, Bradley Alan by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Bradley Alan Friedman (CC class of 1982) was born in Denver, Colorado in 1959 and graduated from Cherry Creek High School in 1978. He attended Colorado College from 1978-1982, graduating with a B.A. in History/Political Science. He was a member of the Alpha Lambda Delta honor fraternity, Chavarim, Phi Delta Theta fraternity, and the Colorado College Campus Association, of which he served as president. His interview took place during his senior year at Colorado College and focuses on campus organizations and activism during the early 1980’s.

  • Thumbnail for Jones, Raymond Dean
    Jones, Raymond Dean by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Raymond D. Jones (CC class of 1967) was born in Pueblo, Colorado on November 30, 1945. While at Colorado College, Jones was the first African-American president of the Beta Theta Pi fraternity. After graduating from Colorado College, he received his law degree from Harvard University in 1971. At the time of this interview he was a judge in the Denver District Court, appointed by Governor Richard Lamm. Jones’ interview focuses on campus life in the 1960’s, attitudes about civil rights in Colorado Springs, and experiences from the perspective of a minority student.

  • Thumbnail for Hochman, William R.
    Hochman, William R. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor William R. Hochman was born on August 28, 1921 in New York City, and received his B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University. He served in the United States Navy during World War II. Professor Hochman joined the Colorado College faculty as instructor of history in 1955, as assistant professor from 1955 through 1960, as associate professor from 1960 to 1965, and as professor from 1965 until his retirement in 1998. He served as Chair of the Department of Education for four years, beginning in 1964 and as Chair of the History Department from 1970 to 1983, and Dean of the Summer Session from 1990–1998. He also served on innumerable campus committees and as faculty marshal for many years. Notable for his compelling public speaking, Professor Hochman was long active in local, state and national Democratic Party politics, but he is best known as an outstanding teacher by his many former students, particularly the alumni of Freedom and Authority.

  • Thumbnail for Penland, Charles William Theodore
    Penland, Charles William Theodore by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor C. William T. Penland received his B.A. in 1920 from the University of Wyoming and his Ph.D. in Biology in 1925 from Harvard University. Except for a period of military service during World War II, and a semester in South America, he taught at Colorado College continuously from 1922 until his retirement in 1968, serving on the faculty longer than anyone else in the institution's history. An avid mountaineer, Dr. Penland was particularly well-known for his studies of the fungi and algae of Alpine tundra. His interview includes descriptions of the low faculty salaries, the Biology Department and Forestry School, the appearance of campus and Colorado Springs, President Duniway's administration, and the Alpine Laboratories of the Carnegie Institution (located three miles up the Cog Railway.) He talks about his extracurricular activities: mountaineering, hiking with Saturday Knights, Round Table Club, and searching for new plants.

  • Thumbnail for Bryson, Dorothy Printup
    Bryson, Dorothy Printup by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Dorothy Printup Hulbert Bryson was an instructor in Greek and Latin at Colorado College from 1921-1925. In 1923 she married history professor and noted historian Archer Butler Hulbert who became head of the Stewart Commission on Western History. After his death in 1933, she served as editor of the Commission until 1941. She returned to Colorado College between 1951 and 1960, working in various capacities: as head resident, summer school secretary, and part-time English instructor. She was active in many community organizations including the Woman's Educational Society. She received an honorary doctorate of humane letters from Colorado College in 1989. Her third husband was A. Earl Bryson (CC class of 1911).

  • Thumbnail for Copeland, William D.
    Copeland, William D. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    William D. Copeland (CC class of 1919) served as instructor in English and secretary of the College from 1920 to 1935. He later served as president of Lincoln College in Lincoln, Illinois, vice president of Lake Forest College in Illinois, president of Rocky Mountain College in Billings, Montana, and pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in Polson, Montana. Copeland gives his impressions of Colorado College both before and after World War I, including memories of Presidents Slocum, Duniway, Mierow, and Davies. He talks about the effects of the Depression,"straight-laced CC" in the 1920's, athletic teams, fraternities, and the San Luis School. Faculty mentioned in the interview: Cajori, Schneider, Parsons, Blum, Parrish, Hills, Howe, Hulbert, Gilmore, Strieby, and Okey.

  • Thumbnail for Carter, Harvey L.
    Carter, Harvey L. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Carter joined the faculty in the Department of History at Colorado College in 1945. Carter talks about people who were at the college during that time (Hershey, Abbott, Malone, Worner). Many of the students were WWII veterans. Because faculty salaries were very low (highest salary was $3600), Carter organized the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter and worked with President Gill to draft salary ranks and faculty tenure policies. Carter talks about the effects of the McCarthy era on the Colorado College campus, and President's Gill's defense of those targeted. He resigned as History Department Chair in 1959. Carter was curator of the Hulbert Collection of Western Americana. He talks about his own writing: western fur trade, Hafen sketches of mountain men, Kit Carson, limerick writing, and his philosophy of teaching.

  • Thumbnail for Johns, Gilbert R.
    Johns, Gilbert R. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor of Psychology Gilbert R. Johns, who received his Ph.D. from the University of Indiana, came to Colorado College in 1962, following a teaching appointment at Ohio University. His specialties have been in sensory psychology and perception and the history of science and psychology. Professor Johns served as the Dean of the Colorado College Summer Session for 15 years, from 1965 to 1981. He was director of the Colorado Opera Festival from 1970 to 1978. From 1982 to 1992 he was critic at large for the Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph. He retired in 1996.

  • Thumbnail for Wood, Richard E.
    Wood, Richard E. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    After 30 years as Colorado College's Director of Admissions, Richard E. Wood retired in 1991. He was known as the dean of admissions directors on a national level, due to his remarkable success in his field. Born in 1927 in East Orange, New Jersey, Wood graduated from Dickinson College in 1952, and received an M.A. from Columbia Teachers College in 1953. After positions at Pratt Institute and Denver University, he came to Colorado College in 1959 as Assistant Director of Development. Named Admissions Director in 1961, he also served several years as Registrar and Financial Aid Director.

  • Thumbnail for Deaver, Velma Burdick
    Deaver, Velma Burdick by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Velma's parents came to the Meeker area in1896 where she was born December 31, 1901. Her mother had eleven children and Velma was the oldest girl. They lived on ranches where her father worked. She remembers: walking a mile to school in the winter, inside chores, outside chores, haying, care for animals, clothing, play, puberty, Christmas, and the Mormon religion in her family. She talks about her mother's births at home. Velma gives details about: washing and ironing, attending rural schools, and high school in Meeker. She went to Western State College for 2 1/2 years and then began teaching. She continued college during the summers. Velma married Hoyt Deaver at twenty-five and continued teaching while her husband worked on ranches and in coal mines. They lived in Rangely and Craig and had one child. She talks about enjoying her teaching career. Velma died in 1999.

  • Thumbnail for Bradley, Richard Crane
    Bradley, Richard Crane by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Richard C. Bradley received his B.A. in Physics from Dartmouth College in 1943. Following wartime service in the U.S. Naval Reserve, he completed a Ph.D. in Physics at the University of California, Berkeley, in 1953. From 1953-1961 he was a researcher and faculty member at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. In 1961, he came to Colorado College as Associate Professor of Physics, and was promoted to Full Professor in 1966. He retired from a long and distinguished career at Colorado College in 1987, including six years as Dean of the Faculty and Dean of the College from 1973 to 1979. Active in environmental politics both at the local and national level, Bradley served as president of the Springs Area Beautiful Association from 1971 to 1973, and as a trustee of the National Parks Association from 1966 to 1976. An avid cross-country skier, he is also noted for his interest in music as a long-time member of the Colorado Springs Chorale, the Colorado Opera Festival Board, and as a composer of some note.

  • Thumbnail for Vickerman, Mary Carolyn Bloom
    Vickerman, Mary Carolyn Bloom by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Mary Carolyn Bloom Vickerman (CC class of 1932) was a native of Colorado Springs and her husband, Sam Vickerman (CC class of 1933), was a native of Westcliffe, Colorado. Mrs. Vickerman worked for the college almost from the time she became a student. As an undergraduate, she was an assistant at Coburn Library, as well as in a number of biology labs. In 1933 and 1934, she served as the night librarian at Coburn Library, and then from 1935 through 1940, was the secretary to the Colorado College Men's Athletic Department. In 1946, she began working at the Colorado College Bookstore in Lennox House, and in 1949 became the manager of the bookstore until her retirement in 1969. She was a life member of the Woman's Educational Society at Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Mertz, Joseph Douglas
    Mertz, Joseph Douglas by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Joseph Douglas Mertz, a 1938 graduate of Ursinus College, received his law degree from Yale Law School in 1942. After two years teaching law at Dickinson Law School in Carlyle, Pennsylvania, he joined the Political Science Department at Colorado College in 1948, as assistant professor. He became associate professor and chairman of the department in 1953. He served as chairman until 1972 and retired in 1982. In addition to his faculty appointment, he also served the college as legal consultant from 1970 to 1982, and as general secretary from 1982 through 1983. He discusses the effects of McCarthyism during the Gill presidency, the growth of the Political Science Department, the effects of the Block Plan, and his work with President Worner and the Board of Trustees.

  • Thumbnail for Murray, Constance Postlethwaite and Greiner, Isabel Postlethwaite
    Murray, Constance Postlethwaite and Greiner, Isabel Postlethwaite by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Mrs. Constance Postlethwaite Murray and her sister, Mrs. Isabel Postlethwaite Greiner provide memories of their student days and their recollections of their father, William W. Postlethwaite, who served as General Palmer's personal secretary, and then as treasurer of Colorado College from 1911 to 1940 and as curator of the Colorado College museum from 1940 until his death in 1955. Mrs. Murray (CC class of 1932) served as an alumni trustee from 1954 to 1957. Mrs. Greiner (CC class of 1925) completed her Colorado College studies as a special student at the affiliated Academy of Fine Arts.

  • Thumbnail for Tyree, William Woodson
    Tyree, William Woodson by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    William Woodson Tyree,was Professor of Speech and Drama at Colorado College from 1944 to 1968. A native of West Virginia, "Chief Tyree," as he was commonly known, grew up in Durant, Oklahoma, received his B.A. in English from Oklahoma University in 1926, and his M.A. from the State University of Oklahoma in 1938. Before coming to Colorado College, he taught school for 17 years in Ponca City, Oklahoma. While at Colorado College, Professor Tyree established the first FM radio station in the Rocky Mountain region, KRCC-FM, and produced many plays and variety shows in addition to his teaching duties.

  • Thumbnail for Shaw, Van Burton
    Shaw, Van Burton by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Van Shaw came to Colorado College in 1952 as Professor of Sociology. He served as chairman of the Sociology Department from 1954 through 1968. Active in community affairs, he served as president of the Colorado Springs Family Service Association. In his interview, Shaw discusses his roles as professor and committee member, philosophy of teaching, student attitudes, the block plan, race relations at Colorado College, the 1960s, college presidents.

  • Thumbnail for Kawcak, Julia Biskup
    Kawcak, Julia Biskup by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Julia's parents settled on a homestead in Breeze Basin near Craig in 1908. Her parents were Austrian immigrants and had six children. There was a large Catholic community in Breeze Basin and Elk Head, the areas where families gathered for church (in a tent) and in homes for dances and activities. She describes: her mother's trip from Austria, the homestead cabin, her father's jobs, the J.W. Hugas store in Craig, "Mormon crickets," chores, play, school, clothes washing, and teenage activities. Julia married Paul Kawcak at sixteen and describes a "wedding shivaree." Paul was a coal miner from Walsenburg and many of his friends followed him to Craig to farm and ranch. She describes their homestead: clearing the land, building the house, and digging the well. Her husband worked in the mines while she worked the homestead with their nine boys and seven girls. She talks about: milking cows, cooking, making clothing, Catholic Church activities, dances at the school, and home remedies. Julia died in 1987.

  • Thumbnail for Knott, CeCelia Sullivan
    Knott, CeCelia Sullivan by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    CeCelia's mother came to Northwestern Colorado in 1910 at about age 17. Her grandfather Sullivan had established a homestead on the Williams Fork River, and later her father filed on a homestead in the same area, which is where her parents settled and raised eleven children. CeCelia talks about her mother's life on the homestead. She worked outside taking care of the animals and helped with haying, etc., as well as all the house work. They hauled water in barrels from the river. CeCelia was born in 1918. When CeCelia was seven her mother was injured by a cow and the children took over all the inside and outside work for a time. CeCelia went to the Pagoda one room summer school through the eighth grade, and then boarded with families to attend high school in Hayden. She had hopes for a career, but married at eighteen. CeCelia had one child. She worked at various jobs in Craig to provide needed income and extra opportunities for her daughter. She was divorced in 1957 and often worked two jobs after that. The job she enjoyed by far the most was as a teacher's aide in the elementary school in her later years. CeCelia died in 2005.

  • Thumbnail for Sides, Bernice Van Cleave and Richards, Beryl Van Cleave
    Sides, Bernice Van Cleave and Richards, Beryl Van Cleave by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Bernice and Beryl are twin sisters who were born in Oregon in 1903. They came to Meeker in 1903 with their father, a carpenter, and their mother, a teacher. The women wanted to be interviewed together. Bernice tells of their mother's death from surgery on the dining room table - they were six years old. She describes life in Meeker in the early 1900's: clothes washing, schools, games, women's activities, a "poor farm", and adult activities. She also describes her career as a bank cashier. Then Beryl speaks and talks about the early death of their mother and their relationship to the woman their father married, in part, to care for them. Beryl describes the organization of Meeker's first library by a group of women in 1925. Both sisters were then interviewed and they spoke about: school, play, baking, housekeeping, view of marriage, and coping without their mother. Beryl talks about her marriage to Father Richards and her role as an Episcopal priest's wife. Bernice talks about her married life with William "Bill" Sides, and her career in the bank. Neither sister had children. Beryl died in 1994, and Bernice died in 1990.

  • Thumbnail for Warren, Doris Stephenson
    Warren, Doris Stephenson by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Doris's mother was born on the trip west in a covered wagon train from Indiana. Doris's grandparents came to the Meeker area in 1889 to homestead on Flag Creek. Her grandmother, Minirva Wilson, told her about the trip west. Doris describes: the homestead cabin, the reservoir, home remedies, and cooking. Doris's mother, Goldie May Stephenson, went to college in Boulder at the University, against her father's wishes, and Doris relates stories of her experiences. She returned to Meeker to teach in the Coal Creek School and in Meeker. Goldie May stopped teaching when her children were born, but went back because of the Great Depression. She was also elected Rio Blanco County Superintendent of Schools, but had to resign because she was pregnant. Goldie May tended to sick people during the 1918 flu, and Doris relates her mother's experiences during that time. Doris grew up in Meeker. She didn't attend college because of lack of funds. She worked in the County Clerk's office, until she ran for County Treasurer and was elected, the first woman elected to that post. She talks about working women and working mothers.

  • Thumbnail for Woolley, Estel Aicher
    Woolley, Estel Aicher by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Estel's father came to the Meeker area in about 1888, and her mother came in 1898 to visit her sister. They married and lived on the homestead on Flag Creek. Estel was the only child. She describes her mother's life on the ranch. Estel wasn't expected to do any of the work. She talks about: riding her horse to school in very cold winters, play with neighbors, home remedies, puberty, and sports in school. Her parents bought a ranch in Grand Junction where Estel attended high school. She also went high school in Denver. She went to Business College in Grand Junction and then returned to Meeker to work in the County Clerk's office, where she worked for several years. Estel married a man from Craig, Raymond "Ray" Woolley, but they eventually settled in Meeker where she had two daughters. She talks about: childbirth and aftercare. While she worked, her mother did her housework and ironing, and cooked for her in-laws. Estel also talks about surgery in homes - her father drove the doctor to country appointments and administered ether. Estel died in 1990.

  • Thumbnail for Crawford, Ethelyn Whalin
    Crawford, Ethelyn Whalin by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Ethelyn was born in Thornberg, Rio Blanco County in 1913. In her early years, Ethelyn grew up on a ranch on Wilson Creek near Meeker. There were eight children in the family. Her mother taught the children at home until they started school in Meeker. She also attended the Axial School for one year. She talks about many childhood memories of play, home, daily activities, and clothing. As a teen ager she talks about: puberty, dances, clubs, poetry, epilepsy, and travel to California. Ethelyn married at twenty-one and later divorced. Ethelyn had two children. She later married twice. She worked "between marriages" as a real estate broker and business administrator. Ethelyn talks about how she arranged for child care and about women's clubs in Meeker. Ethelyn died in 2001.

  • Thumbnail for Kenney, Glee Cloward
    Kenney, Glee Cloward by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    When she was eight years old, Glee came to the Rangely area with her father and two siblings (1921?). Her mother had just died of diabetes. Her father had worked in the coal mines in Winterquarters, Utah where Glee was born in 1913. Her father leased a ranch near Rangely where he felt he could take better care of the three children. She describes: household chores, winter activities, dances, school, puberty, and clothing. Glee also describes the town of Rangely and what staples her family bought at the one store. She talks about their food sources: meat from cows, and hunting. Glee married Lester Kenney at seventeen and lived on several ranches owned by her husband's father in the Rangely area. She had three children and went to Vernal, Utah and Grand Junction, Colorado for their births. She describes the small school in Rangely (twelve children) that had teachers who boarded with local families. Glee died in 2000.