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  • Thumbnail for Hochman, William R.
    Hochman, William R. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor William R. Hochman was born on August 28, 1921 in New York City, and received his B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University. He served in the United States Navy during World War II. Professor Hochman joined the Colorado College faculty as instructor of history in 1955, as assistant professor from 1955 through 1960, as associate professor from 1960 to 1965, and as professor from 1965 until his retirement in 1998. He served as Chair of the Department of Education for four years, beginning in 1964 and as Chair of the History Department from 1970 to 1983, and Dean of the Summer Session from 1990–1998. He also served on innumerable campus committees and as faculty marshal for many years. Notable for his compelling public speaking, Professor Hochman was long active in local, state and national Democratic Party politics, but he is best known as an outstanding teacher by his many former students, particularly the alumni of Freedom and Authority.

  • Thumbnail for Penland, Charles William Theodore
    Penland, Charles William Theodore by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor C. William T. Penland received his B.A. in 1920 from the University of Wyoming and his Ph.D. in Biology in 1925 from Harvard University. Except for a period of military service during World War II, and a semester in South America, he taught at Colorado College continuously from 1922 until his retirement in 1968, serving on the faculty longer than anyone else in the institution's history. An avid mountaineer, Dr. Penland was particularly well-known for his studies of the fungi and algae of Alpine tundra. His interview includes descriptions of the low faculty salaries, the Biology Department and Forestry School, the appearance of campus and Colorado Springs, President Duniway's administration, and the Alpine Laboratories of the Carnegie Institution (located three miles up the Cog Railway.) He talks about his extracurricular activities: mountaineering, hiking with Saturday Knights, Round Table Club, and searching for new plants.

  • Thumbnail for Brooks, Glenn E.
    Brooks, Glenn E. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Born in Kerrville, Texas in August 1931, Professor Brooks received his B.A. and M.A. degrees at the University of Texas, and his Ph.D. at Johns Hopkins University in 1960. He joined the faculty of Colorado College's Political Science Department in the fall of 1960, was promoted to Assistant Professor in 1961, to Associate Professor in 1964, and to Full Professor in 1970. Brooks was the chief architect of Colorado College's Block Plan, which went into effect in the fall of 1970. From 1979 through 1987, he served as Dean of the College, and from 1991 to 1993 as Director of Strategic Planning. His principal interests in public policy and in curricular and managerial reform in higher education led him to international consultancies in Africa and at the Universidad de Puebla, Mexico.

  • Thumbnail for Hamilton, Mary Alice
    Hamilton, Mary Alice by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Dr. Mary Alice “Pinky” Hamilton first came to Colorado Springs in 1947 with her sister, Sally, and brother-in-law, Robert M. Stabler, as he joined the Colorado College faculty as a zoologist. A 1933 graduate of Elmira College, New York, Hamilton received her Ph.D. in physiology from Columbia University and from 1939 to 1941 did research at the University of Michigan Medical School. Hamilton became the associate lab director for the Colorado Foundation for Research in Tuberculosis from 1947 to 1952. She began to lecture in zoology at Colorado College in 1950, becoming assistant professor in 1958, associate professor in 1963, professor of biology in 1972, and retiring as professor emerita in 1977. She also assisted her brother-in-law, Robert Stabler, with research projects related to trichomoniasis in pigeons and falcons.

  • Thumbnail for Bryson, Dorothy Printup
    Bryson, Dorothy Printup by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Dorothy Printup Hulbert Bryson was an instructor in Greek and Latin at Colorado College from 1921-1925. In 1923 she married history professor and noted historian Archer Butler Hulbert who became head of the Stewart Commission on Western History. After his death in 1933, she served as editor of the Commission until 1941. She returned to Colorado College between 1951 and 1960, working in various capacities: as head resident, summer school secretary, and part-time English instructor. She was active in many community organizations including the Woman's Educational Society. She received an honorary doctorate of humane letters from Colorado College in 1989. Her third husband was A. Earl Bryson (CC class of 1911).

  • Thumbnail for Carter, Harvey L.
    Carter, Harvey L. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Carter joined the faculty in the Department of History at Colorado College in 1945. Carter talks about people who were at the college during that time (Hershey, Abbott, Malone, Worner). Many of the students were WWII veterans. Because faculty salaries were very low (highest salary was $3600), Carter organized the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter and worked with President Gill to draft salary ranks and faculty tenure policies. Carter talks about the effects of the McCarthy era on the Colorado College campus, and President's Gill's defense of those targeted. He resigned as History Department Chair in 1959. Carter was curator of the Hulbert Collection of Western Americana. He talks about his own writing: western fur trade, Hafen sketches of mountain men, Kit Carson, limerick writing, and his philosophy of teaching.

  • Thumbnail for Ormes, Robert Manly
    Ormes, Robert Manly by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Ormes (CC class of 1926) taught English at Colorado College from 1952 to 1973. He was also well known and highly regarded as a mountaineer, raconteur and author of several books, including A Guide to the Colorado Mountains, Colorado Skylines, Pike's Peak Atlas, Tracking Colorado's Ghost Railroads and Railroads and the Rockies. Born in Colorado Springs in 1904, Ormes was the son of Manly Ormes, former head librarian of Coburn Library, Colorado College. Ormes recounts his memories of growing up around Colorado College and his adventures in the nearby mountains.

  • Thumbnail for Reinitz, Neale R.
    Reinitz, Neale R. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Neale Reinitz received a B.A. in English from the University of Wisconsin in 1947, an M.A. in English from Harvard in 1949 and his Ph.D. in English from University of California at Berkeley in 1958. Professor Reinitz was a member of the English department at Colorado College from 1953 until his retirement in 1991. His special interests include biking, hiking, rafting, wine, books, jazz, the Marx Brothers, cross-country skiing and photography.

  • Thumbnail for Beidleman, Richard Gooch
    Beidleman, Richard Gooch by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    A prolific writer, a much sought-after speaker, and a highly respected professor, Richard Beidleman is one of Colorado College's most notable faculty members. He taught zoology from 1957-1968 and biology from 1968-1988. His research interests centered on the role of natural scientists in frontier America and Australia, and he helped author high school and junior high school biology textbooks, among approximately 250 other published works. The Colorado Springs community knows him best as a dedicated environmental activist who fought for many years for such causes as the preservation of the White House Ranch and the Garden of the Gods Park, the prevention of strip mining along Front Range quarries, and the successful League of Women Voters lawsuit against the City of Colorado Springs regarding the Palmer deeded parks. He served on the Colorado State Parks Board for eight years, including three and a half years as its chairman and succeeded, among other things, in obtaining Muehler Ranch as a state park. The Beidleman Environmental Center at Sondermann Park was established in his honor by the City of Colorado Springs.

  • Thumbnail for Jones, Jean Armstrong and Jones, Gerald L.
    Jones, Jean Armstrong and Jones, Gerald L. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Jean Armstrong Jones (CC class of 1944) graduated with a B. A. degree in English and her husband, Gerald L. Jones, a member of the Naval V-12 Unit, was assigned to Colorado College from 1943-1945. Jean Armstrong Jones has a particularly long association with the college. Both of her parents graduated from Colorado College in 1899. Her father, Willis R. Armstrong, for whom Armstrong Hall is named, served as a trustee of the college from 1903 until 1956, and numerous members of her family also attended Colorado College. Gerald Jones has been associated with the Colorado Springs National Bank since 1946. Jean Jones provides memories of her childhood in Colorado Springs. Both Mr. and Mrs. Jones describe life on campus during World War II.

  • Thumbnail for Kutsche, Paul
    Kutsche, Paul by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Paul Kutsche, "Buzz," was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan on January 3, 1927. He received a B.A. from Harvard College in 1949; his M.A. in Anthropology from the University of Michigan in 1955; and his Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1961. Kutsche came to Colorado College in the fall of 1959 as an assistant professor of sociology and anthropology. He is credited with creating a separate Anthropology Department in 1964. He was named professor in 1970, and finally professor emeritus in 1993. Author of many articles in professional journals, he also co-authored, with John Van Ness, a book entitled Canones. He has been an active advocate of homosexual rights in Colorado and around the country.

  • Thumbnail for Tyree, William Woodson
    Tyree, William Woodson by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    William Woodson Tyree,was Professor of Speech and Drama at Colorado College from 1944 to 1968. A native of West Virginia, "Chief Tyree," as he was commonly known, grew up in Durant, Oklahoma, received his B.A. in English from Oklahoma University in 1926, and his M.A. from the State University of Oklahoma in 1938. Before coming to Colorado College, he taught school for 17 years in Ponca City, Oklahoma. While at Colorado College, Professor Tyree established the first FM radio station in the Rocky Mountain region, KRCC-FM, and produced many plays and variety shows in addition to his teaching duties.

  • Thumbnail for Keener, Helen Lennox
    Keener, Helen Lennox by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Helen Lennox Keener graduated from Cutler Academy in 1913 and then from Colorado College (CC class of 1917). Mrs. Keener's family, the Lennox family, was one of the prominent pioneer families of the Pikes Peak region. With her husband, George Keener, she owned and operated for many years the Plaza Hotel (now Spencer Center) at the southwest corner of Cache la Poudre and Tejon streets. Her interview describes life at Cutler Academy and the academic and social life at Colorado College between 1913-1917.

  • Thumbnail for Sondermann, Judy
    Sondermann, Judy by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Judy Sondermann (CC class of 1981) is the daughter of the late Colorado College Professor Fred A. Sondermann. Judy graduated with a B.A. in psychology, and a Certificate of Education. She played women's varsity soccer for Colorado College for four years. In 1981, she was selected for a women's college soccer team that traveled to Europe for training and competition. In the 1981-82 season, Judy was an assistant coach of Colorado College's women's soccer team. She discusses growing up at Colorado College, campus life as a student, athletics, soccer, and her father, Fred Sondermann.

  • Thumbnail for Seay, Albert
    Seay, Albert by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Albert Seay came to Colorado College in 1953, after completing his dissertation at Yale. Dr. Seay was professor of music and head of the music department at Colorado College until 1982, when he retired. He established the Colorado College Music Press in 1955, which focuses on publishing translations and transcriptions of music. His interview discusses the growth of the Music Department, the Music Press, and the changes in music students during his career.

  • Thumbnail for Young, Betty Ann
    Young, Betty Ann by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Betty Young was born October 22, 1919 in Cleveland, Ohio and graduated from Grinnell College with a B.A. in Physical Education in 1942 and from University of Colorado with an M.S. in Physical Education in 1951. She came to Colorado College in 1956 as instructor and director of the Women's Physical Education program until her retirement in 1975. She discusses development of women's sports and Title IX.

  • Thumbnail for Eberle, Janet Mortimer
    Eberle, Janet Mortimer by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Janet was born in Kersey, Colorado on February 11, 1911. She came to the Craig area in 1918 with her parents, as an only child. They lived on her grandfather's ranch on Little Bear, for three years. They moved to various rural schools where her mother taught and her father helped at the school and worked at odd jobs. Then they filed on a homestead in 1925 and Janet's mother continued to teach in rural schools. Janet talks about: women being able to support themselves, homestead work, home schooling, clothing, puberty, play as a "tomboy", and play with sleds and skis. Janet describes: the homestead cabin, cooking, food preservation, sleeping with quilts and flat irons, lack of illness, health concerns in her rural community, death of neighbor from self abortion, and care of the deceased. She talks about: Craig high school activities, college, and her own teaching in rural schools. She married Ernest at twenty-six and had two children in her mid-thirties. Their home was in Hamilton on a ranch, where she served as census enumerator and Moffat County Superintendent of Schools.

  • Thumbnail for Warren, Doris Stephenson
    Warren, Doris Stephenson by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Doris's mother was born on the trip west in a covered wagon train from Indiana. Doris's grandparents came to the Meeker area in 1889 to homestead on Flag Creek. Her grandmother, Minirva Wilson, told her about the trip west. Doris describes: the homestead cabin, the reservoir, home remedies, and cooking. Doris's mother, Goldie May Stephenson, went to college in Boulder at the University, against her father's wishes, and Doris relates stories of her experiences. She returned to Meeker to teach in the Coal Creek School and in Meeker. Goldie May stopped teaching when her children were born, but went back because of the Great Depression. She was also elected Rio Blanco County Superintendent of Schools, but had to resign because she was pregnant. Goldie May tended to sick people during the 1918 flu, and Doris relates her mother's experiences during that time. Doris grew up in Meeker. She didn't attend college because of lack of funds. She worked in the County Clerk's office, until she ran for County Treasurer and was elected, the first woman elected to that post. She talks about working women and working mothers.

  • Thumbnail for Rector, Stella B. LaForce
    Rector, Stella B. LaForce by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Stella was born in Oak Creek, Colorado and grew up near McCoy, Colorado on a ranch until she was six years old when her father died. She had five siblings. Stella's mother moved the family to Glenwood Springs so that she could work and her children could finish high school. The children spent summers on the ranch. She talks about: homemade clothing, working during the depression, and summers on the ranch. Stella married Jay Rector and traveled with him to construction jobs. Later they worked on the Kirk ranch, and finally on her husband's father's ranch, both near Rangely. She talks about her husband's mother, who had ten children and first came to the area in 1898 at six years old. Stella describes: washing clothes, cooking for family and extra help, gardening, sewing, roundup, and needlework. The ranch was twenty miles from town, and she saw few neighbors. She liked the chores outside, but not the cooking. She had four children, and talks about her daughter's education, etc. Stella describes the town library, 4H, and women's clubs. Stella died in 1991.

  • Thumbnail for Kirby, Ruby Lucile Rector
    Kirby, Ruby Lucile Rector by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Ruby Kirby's parents (sister is Leona Rector Hinricks) came to the Rangely area in 1898-99. They had three children, Ruby (born in 1902), Leona, and a son. Ruby talks about Ute Indians who visited the ranch. And she describes: home remedies, chores, play, and riding horses. The children had tutors at home and also spent winters in Grand Junction for school. Ruby describes activities at the ranch during their teenage years: house work, horses, picnics, dances, and the family band. She and her sister went to Western State College. Ruby worked in San Francisco for three years in 1927 and then returned home. She married Russel Dare in 1936, but he was shot in front of the Rangely store by a "squatter" when she was eight months pregnant. After having her daughter, she soon married Albert Kirby, a local rancher. They continued to ranch in the area until Albert died two years prior to this interview, but Ruby's daughter and family live on the ranch and she continues to move between summer and winter ranches. Ruby died in 1995.

  • Thumbnail for Woolley, Estel Aicher
    Woolley, Estel Aicher by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Estel's father came to the Meeker area in about 1888, and her mother came in 1898 to visit her sister. They married and lived on the homestead on Flag Creek. Estel was the only child. She describes her mother's life on the ranch. Estel wasn't expected to do any of the work. She talks about: riding her horse to school in very cold winters, play with neighbors, home remedies, puberty, and sports in school. Her parents bought a ranch in Grand Junction where Estel attended high school. She also went high school in Denver. She went to Business College in Grand Junction and then returned to Meeker to work in the County Clerk's office, where she worked for several years. Estel married a man from Craig, Raymond "Ray" Woolley, but they eventually settled in Meeker where she had two daughters. She talks about: childbirth and aftercare. While she worked, her mother did her housework and ironing, and cooked for her in-laws. Estel also talks about surgery in homes - her father drove the doctor to country appointments and administered ether. Estel died in 1990.

  • Thumbnail for Blevins, Freddie White
    Blevins, Freddie White by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Freddie's grandfather was one of the first homesteaders in Moffat County in 1902. Freddie speaks about her mother's and her own life in the Craig area. Freddie was born in 1912. She talks about: play, work, sports, puberty, music (piano and singing), and dating. Members of her family played instruments and they played and sang together. She studied music at the University of Colorado and Chicago Conservatory of Music. After living in Hollywood for two years, she returned home and married her high school boyfriend, Tom Blevins, at twenty-six and lived on the family ranch in Brown's Park with their two children. She taught in rural schools for twenty years, earning a teaching certificate in the summers. Freddie died in 2006.

  • Thumbnail for Eddy, Ina Dalrymple
    Eddy, Ina Dalrymple by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Ina was born in Hurley, New Mexico in 1916 into a family of twelve children. When she was two they moved to Meeker, Colorado and her father died when she was six. They then moved to Rifle where she attended school. The family was very poor after father's death and Ina talks about: little medical care, home remedies, puberty, deaths of children from TB, spinal meningitis, years of deprivation and sadness, and describes the death of her closest sister from spinal meningitis. Ina married John H. Eddy when she graduated from high school. After having three children, one premature, she found she was RH negative. The family moved around Colorado for her husband's jobs until settling in Rangely where he worked in the Texaco oil field. She describes the early years of the town of Rangely during the oil boom: streets, and schools. They lived in a Texaco company house near the field. Ina worked in the school cafeteria for a number of years. In later years, she and her husband lived in several places in the West for his employment with the government. She missed watching her grandchildren growing up. Ina died in 1988.

  • Thumbnail for James, Minnie Louise Eberle
    James, Minnie Louise Eberle by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Minnie came to Craig in 1910 with her family when she was fourteen. They lived on a ranch near Craig until they moved to their homestead south of Craig. There were nine children and Minnie was the oldest girl, responsible for many of the household and babysitting chores. She talks about: hauling water from the river, cooking on the coal stove, the cattle/sheep wars, clothing, play, school, and taking care of her sick mother. Minnie boarded in town for high school and talks about activities. She had one year of college and took the state teacher's exam. She then taught in a rural school but didn't like teaching. Minnie moved to California with a friend and went to a business college. She worked as a secretary/bookkeeper for a time and then returned to Craig in 1941. She married Lewis James and moved to the James ranch. Her husband died a year and a half later of pneumonia. She moved back into Craig and worked as a secretary/bookkeeper until retirement. Minnie died in 1989.

  • Thumbnail for Campbell, Esther Anderson (Chandler)
    Campbell, Esther Anderson (Chandler) by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Esther was born in Harmony, Minnesota in 1899. She came to teach in the Skull Creek School from Denver when she was twenty-two. She boarded with a family who lived near the school. She soon married a local cowboy, Duard Campbell, and moved into his mother's homestead dugout cabin, which she describes. She continued teaching until retirement. They later moved to Brown's Park and raised cattle. Esther had one child who lived in Denver with her mother until he was school age because she had to teach. She talks about: hard winters, living conditions, social gatherings, school programs, isolated rural schools, the Home Demonstration Club, Freddie Blevins, June Sweeney, her husband's home duties, and Ute Indians. Esther died in 1995.