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  • Thumbnail for Hochman, William R.
    Hochman, William R. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor William R. Hochman was born on August 28, 1921 in New York City, and received his B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University. He served in the United States Navy during World War II. Professor Hochman joined the Colorado College faculty as instructor of history in 1955, as assistant professor from 1955 through 1960, as associate professor from 1960 to 1965, and as professor from 1965 until his retirement in 1998. He served as Chair of the Department of Education for four years, beginning in 1964 and as Chair of the History Department from 1970 to 1983, and Dean of the Summer Session from 1990–1998. He also served on innumerable campus committees and as faculty marshal for many years. Notable for his compelling public speaking, Professor Hochman was long active in local, state and national Democratic Party politics, but he is best known as an outstanding teacher by his many former students, particularly the alumni of Freedom and Authority.

  • Thumbnail for Drea, William Francis
    Drea, William Francis by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Dr. William Drea was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts on September 5, 1885. Dr. Drea arrived in Colorado Springs in 1917 as a tuberculosis patient, having been a faculty member of the Harvard Dental School before becoming ill. A dentist and a radiologist, he was a lecturer on X-ray in the physics department at Colorado College from 1922 through 1960. From 1928 through 1952 he was also Associate Research Director at the Colorado Foundation for Research in Tuberculosis. At the time of his interview, Dr. Drea was 91 and still a frequent visitor to Tutt Library. He was known for his lively conversation and keen sense of humor which made him a favorite among the library staff. He always wore a fresh cut flower in his coat lapel. He describes Colorado College faculty and administrators: Professor Cajori, Manly Ormes, Louise Kampf, Professor Tileston, Presidents Duniway and Mierow, along with memories of the Cragmor Sanitorium.

  • Thumbnail for Morgan, Sallie Payne
    Morgan, Sallie Payne by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Sallie Payne Morgan came to Colorado College as Assistant Dean of Women in 1949, and became the Dean of Women the following year. One of her main interests was recruiting girls with good academic records and procuring funding for them. Another priority of Dean Morgan was addressing restrictive social rules for women. She describes the discussions about women's dorm hours, her effort to extend them and to lighten the punishments for infringements. She instituted an honor dorm and eventually replaced the older dorm directors with younger women. Morgan talks about memorable people: President Gill, Dean Lew Worner, Glenn Gray, George McCue, Howard Olson, and Frank Krutzke. She retired at 65 in 1957 but returned in 1964 to work as a part-time receptionist at Tutt Library staying for twelve years (retired at age 81).

  • Thumbnail for Carter, Harvey L.
    Carter, Harvey L. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Carter joined the faculty in the Department of History at Colorado College in 1945. Carter talks about people who were at the college during that time (Hershey, Abbott, Malone, Worner). Many of the students were WWII veterans. Because faculty salaries were very low (highest salary was $3600), Carter organized the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter and worked with President Gill to draft salary ranks and faculty tenure policies. Carter talks about the effects of the McCarthy era on the Colorado College campus, and President's Gill's defense of those targeted. He resigned as History Department Chair in 1959. Carter was curator of the Hulbert Collection of Western Americana. He talks about his own writing: western fur trade, Hafen sketches of mountain men, Kit Carson, limerick writing, and his philosophy of teaching.

  • Thumbnail for Boyce, Wallace Campbell
    Boyce, Wallace Campbell by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Wallace Boyce was a faculty member in the Romance Languages Department at Colorado College from 1950 until his retirement in 1979. He received his B.A. from Williams, his M.A. from Middlebury, and his Ph.D. from Princeton in 1956. Before coming to Colorado College, Boyce served in the Army at Camp Carson in the 1940s, and was an intelligence officer in the European Theater in the Second World War. He also coached the Colorado College tennis team from 1953 to 1958, sang in the Colorado College choir for many years and was chairman of the Romance Languages department between 1958 and 1967.

  • Thumbnail for Riley, Pamela
    Riley, Pamela by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Pamela Riley was born March 7, 1942 in Long Beach, California. She received her B.A. with Honors in English from the University of Wyoming in 1964, and her M.A. in Drama in 1966. Later, at the University of Denver, she completed most of her coursework towards a Ph.D. in English. She taught at Community College of Denver 1968 through 1977, and in 1979 -1980, served as an administrator for the general education program there. She married Gresham Riley on September 6, 1980, and accompanied him to Colorado College when he became its tenth president in 1981. She taught in the Department of Drama and Dance and directed several plays at Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Sondermann, Judy
    Sondermann, Judy by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Judy Sondermann (CC class of 1981) is the daughter of the late Colorado College Professor Fred A. Sondermann. Judy graduated with a B.A. in psychology, and a Certificate of Education. She played women's varsity soccer for Colorado College for four years. In 1981, she was selected for a women's college soccer team that traveled to Europe for training and competition. In the 1981-82 season, Judy was an assistant coach of Colorado College's women's soccer team. She discusses growing up at Colorado College, campus life as a student, athletics, soccer, and her father, Fred Sondermann.

  • Thumbnail for Boddington, William Gile "Tim"
    Boddington, William Gile "Tim" by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    William Gile “Tim” Boddington (CC class of 1972) was a Colorado Springs native. He attended Lake Forest College in Illinois during the 1968-69 academic year but transferred to Colorado College in the fall of 1969 and graduated with a B.S. in geology. His interview includes his reflections on academic, athletic and social life at Colorado College during the early 1970’s.

  • Thumbnail for Wilson, Ruth E. Phillips
    Wilson, Ruth E. Phillips by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Ruth Wilson is a Colorado native who attended Colorado College from 1947 to 1949 as a trustee scholar from Colorado Springs High School. As a student, she also worked part-time in the Registrar's office in Cutler Hall from 1947 to 1948, and in the Alumni office from 1948 to 1949. She was a homemaker from 1949 until April of 1974, when she reentered the workforce, working for the Alumni Office and the Development Office in various capacities at Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Haughey, Mary Gates
    Haughey, Mary Gates by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Mary's family came to the Craig area over the mountains in a covered wagon to homestead on Black Mountain in 1911 when she was eight. She had three brothers and the family lived in a two bedroom log cabin. She talks about: living conditions, winter cold and snow, cooking, washing clothes, making clothing, yearly trips to town, rural schools, play, and home remedies. Mary attended high school in Craig and describes school activities. She taught in rural schools for five years after graduating from high school in 1921. Mary lived at the school or with nearby families. She talks about: the schools, students, snowstorms, and homesteading. Mary married, Clarence Haughey, at twenty-two, and they lived in various places in Moffat County. They had four children. Mary talks about her family's interest in politics (women were allowed to vote in 1920). She was the Deputy County Clerk when her husband died at age fifty-one. She later won election to be the County Clerk and served sixteen years. Mary was a quilter. Mary died in 2003.

  • Thumbnail for Knott, CeCelia Sullivan
    Knott, CeCelia Sullivan by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    CeCelia's mother came to Northwestern Colorado in 1910 at about age 17. Her grandfather Sullivan had established a homestead on the Williams Fork River, and later her father filed on a homestead in the same area, which is where her parents settled and raised eleven children. CeCelia talks about her mother's life on the homestead. She worked outside taking care of the animals and helped with haying, etc., as well as all the house work. They hauled water in barrels from the river. CeCelia was born in 1918. When CeCelia was seven her mother was injured by a cow and the children took over all the inside and outside work for a time. CeCelia went to the Pagoda one room summer school through the eighth grade, and then boarded with families to attend high school in Hayden. She had hopes for a career, but married at eighteen. CeCelia had one child. She worked at various jobs in Craig to provide needed income and extra opportunities for her daughter. She was divorced in 1957 and often worked two jobs after that. The job she enjoyed by far the most was as a teacher's aide in the elementary school in her later years. CeCelia died in 2005.

  • Thumbnail for Olson, Howard M.
    Olson, Howard M. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    A graduate of Colorado College (CC class of 1925), Professor Howard M. Olson taught physics at Colorado College between 1925 and 1969. He completed graduate work at the University of California at Berkeley. Olson remembers: Professors Tileston, Lovitt, Sisam, Daehler, Swart, Boucher, Wright and Presidents Duniway and Mierow. In his interview Olson also talks about classwork, fraternities (Pi Kappa Alpha - engineering), dances at the Broadmoor, Bruin Inn, his teaching philosophy, students during the late sixties, and the building of Olin Hall.

  • Thumbnail for Tyree, William Woodson
    Tyree, William Woodson by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    William Woodson Tyree,was Professor of Speech and Drama at Colorado College from 1944 to 1968. A native of West Virginia, "Chief Tyree," as he was commonly known, grew up in Durant, Oklahoma, received his B.A. in English from Oklahoma University in 1926, and his M.A. from the State University of Oklahoma in 1938. Before coming to Colorado College, he taught school for 17 years in Ponca City, Oklahoma. While at Colorado College, Professor Tyree established the first FM radio station in the Rocky Mountain region, KRCC-FM, and produced many plays and variety shows in addition to his teaching duties.

  • Thumbnail for Eddy, Ina Dalrymple
    Eddy, Ina Dalrymple by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Ina was born in Hurley, New Mexico in 1916 into a family of twelve children. When she was two they moved to Meeker, Colorado and her father died when she was six. They then moved to Rifle where she attended school. The family was very poor after father's death and Ina talks about: little medical care, home remedies, puberty, deaths of children from TB, spinal meningitis, years of deprivation and sadness, and describes the death of her closest sister from spinal meningitis. Ina married John H. Eddy when she graduated from high school. After having three children, one premature, she found she was RH negative. The family moved around Colorado for her husband's jobs until settling in Rangely where he worked in the Texaco oil field. She describes the early years of the town of Rangely during the oil boom: streets, and schools. They lived in a Texaco company house near the field. Ina worked in the school cafeteria for a number of years. In later years, she and her husband lived in several places in the West for his employment with the government. She missed watching her grandchildren growing up. Ina died in 1988.

  • Thumbnail for Hoth, Jayne White
    Hoth, Jayne White by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Jayne was born at home in Sunbeam, Colorado in 1918. Her grandmother, Sarah Farrell, came to the Sunbeam area to homestead as a single woman in 1887 from Ohio. She came at age thirty-two because she hadn't married and was considered a failure. She married a cowboy in 1890. Sarah was a practical nurse and delivered many babies in this remote area. Jayne tells stories of her grandmother and mother living on the homestead: home remedies, dances, food, outside work, and isolation in the winter. Jayne talks about her own childhood as a "tomboy." When she started school she went to a rural school and then moved to Denver to live with her grandparents. She returned to the Maybell area in 1944 at age twenty-six with one son and divorced. She married again to Carl E. "Mike" Hoth, and lived on ranches where her husband worked. Jayne cooked for the ranch hands and also worked outside with her husband. They had three children. Jayne talks about: ranch life, hobbies, and clubs. Jayne died in 1989.

  • Thumbnail for Campbell, Esther Anderson (Chandler)
    Campbell, Esther Anderson (Chandler) by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Esther was born in Harmony, Minnesota in 1899. She came to teach in the Skull Creek School from Denver when she was twenty-two. She boarded with a family who lived near the school. She soon married a local cowboy, Duard Campbell, and moved into his mother's homestead dugout cabin, which she describes. She continued teaching until retirement. They later moved to Brown's Park and raised cattle. Esther had one child who lived in Denver with her mother until he was school age because she had to teach. She talks about: hard winters, living conditions, social gatherings, school programs, isolated rural schools, the Home Demonstration Club, Freddie Blevins, June Sweeney, her husband's home duties, and Ute Indians. Esther died in 1995.

  • Thumbnail for Young, Betty Ann
    Young, Betty Ann by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Betty Young was born October 22, 1919 in Cleveland, Ohio and graduated from Grinnell College with a B.A. in Physical Education in 1942 and from University of Colorado with an M.S. in Physical Education in 1951. She came to Colorado College in 1956 as instructor and director of the Women's Physical Education program until her retirement in 1975. She discusses development of women's sports and Title IX.

  • Thumbnail for Hinricks, Leona Rector
    Hinricks, Leona Rector by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Leona's father came to the Rangely area in 1885 from Texas, and her mother arrived in 1899 after her marriage. They purchased a ranch on the White River. There were twelve to fourteen families in the area when Leona and her sister (Ruby Rector Kirby) and brother were children. She talks about: her mother's childbirths, community dances at their house, winter activities, musical instruments, play, school, work, and clothing. Leona discusses: cooking, baking bread, eating their own cows, hogs, chickens, turkeys, staples, washing clothes, home remedies (Ute Indians), and diseases. She talks about relations with the Ute Indians who came by their house during hunting season. She and her siblings attended high school in Grand Junction. Leona attended Western State College for three years and then married Clarence Hinricks. Her husband worked in oil fields in Wyoming and near Craig (Iles Grove). She taught in rural schools for seven years. They had one son. She talks about teaching one winter at the Moropas one room school. She later worked as an office manager. She worked outside the home for thirty years. Leona died in 1995.

  • Thumbnail for Kawcak, Julia Biskup
    Kawcak, Julia Biskup by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Julia's parents settled on a homestead in Breeze Basin near Craig in 1908. Her parents were Austrian immigrants and had six children. There was a large Catholic community in Breeze Basin and Elk Head, the areas where families gathered for church (in a tent) and in homes for dances and activities. She describes: her mother's trip from Austria, the homestead cabin, her father's jobs, the J.W. Hugas store in Craig, "Mormon crickets," chores, play, school, clothes washing, and teenage activities. Julia married Paul Kawcak at sixteen and describes a "wedding shivaree." Paul was a coal miner from Walsenburg and many of his friends followed him to Craig to farm and ranch. She describes their homestead: clearing the land, building the house, and digging the well. Her husband worked in the mines while she worked the homestead with their nine boys and seven girls. She talks about: milking cows, cooking, making clothing, Catholic Church activities, dances at the school, and home remedies. Julia died in 1987.

  • Thumbnail for Lyons, Iris Self
    Lyons, Iris Self by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Iris's parents came from Georgia to Spring Gulch, two miles north of Williams Fork in Moffat County in 1914 with seven children. Iris was born in 1905. The nearest neighbor was 5 miles away. Her father had a college education and taught at the Wattle Creek school and was also a preacher. Her mother found life much harder than in Georgia. Iris describes life on the homestead: garden, cows, wheat, deer, hogs, clothing, play, puberty, and the one room school. For high school the children stayed in a rented house in Craig while their parents stayed on the ranch. Iris was interested in science and wanted to be a nurse. She went to Denver General Hospital for nurses training after high school. She describes some early nursing techniques and home remedies. Iris came home to marry Wayne Lyons and they lived on the Lyon's family homestead in Breeze Basin in 1930 and had four children. She worked as a nurse when she was needed. At one point they would have closed the Hayden hospital if not for her. Later she worked at the Craig hospital. Iris died in 1999.

  • Thumbnail for Mott, Jennie J. Steele
    Mott, Jennie J. Steele by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Jennie's parents came to Rangely in 1926 with nine children. They homesteaded on Little Foundation in 1931, thirty miles from Rangely. Jennie was born in 1930. The family eventually had eleven children, but two died with "crib death," and one was a still birth. Her mother didn't have a doctor for some of them. She talks about her mother doing the work inside and outside the house: irrigation, milking, and feeding cows. Jennie talks about medical care in a very rural area: broken bones, scarlet fever, and the doctor who came from Meeker for emergencies. Jennie discusses big winter snows and cold, and riding to school on horses. Her mother home schooled the children some years. Her mother eventually got her B.A. and Master's degrees and taught in the Rangely schools for twenty years. Jennie finished high school in Rangely. Jennie talks about the house they lived in on the ranch, sometimes sleeping three to a bed in the two room house. Later they built a new house, and the children slept in the old house. Jennie also talks about what they did for entertainment, and travel away from the ranch.

  • Thumbnail for Savage, Rosamay Hodges
    Savage, Rosamay Hodges by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Rosamay was born in 1898 on a ranch near Juniper Springs. Her mother, Bell, lived as a young woman in Maybell and the town may have been named after her and her sister, May. Rosamay's father was the foreman on the K-Diamond Ranch and there were no nearby neighbors. She and her sister rode horses and played with dolls. After her father died, they moved to Maybell where her mother owned a drugstore. She describes visiting an Indian camp at Cross Mountain. Rosamay also talks about: clothing for school, riding, home remedies, and dances. Her education ended after one year in high school for financial reasons. She later went to business college and worked for three years before marrying. Her husband, George Savage, was the chief of police in Boulder, Colorado. When he retired they bought a ranch near Rangely and she joined the Home Demonstration Club. She had no children. She enjoyed textile painting and quilting. Rosamay died in 1993.

  • Thumbnail for Holland, Norine
    Holland, Norine by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Norine's grandparents came to Meeker in the early 1900's and lived on a ranch on the White River. Her mother, a teacher, came from Denver in 1912. She tells many stories of her mother teaching in rural schools and as Rio Blanco County Superintendent, and of her own experiences in rural schools. She tells of life on the ranch: cooking, clothing, animals, food preservation, transportation, heating, washing, and play. She talks about: access to medical help, home remedies, the early death of her father, mother's midwifery, pregnancy, childbirth, puberty, and divorce. Norine attended college and became a teacher in Meeker. Her fiancé was killed in WWII, so she earned a Master's degree in social work and worked in Denver until retirement. She now spends her summers in the Meeker area.

  • Thumbnail for Whalin, Inez Ely
    Whalin, Inez Ely by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Inez Whalin tells her experiences through her daughter, Ethelyn Crawford. When she was twenty-three years old, Inez married her husband at her home in rural Illinois, a much more settled area than northwestern Colorado in 1912. At that time he was the foreman on the James ranch in Moffat County. Inez cooked for all the ranch hands. They soon moved to Mr. Whalin's homestead on Thornburg near Meeker, a one room log cabin, which she describes. Inez had eight children, but lost one who was eight months old to pneumonia. The doctor usually missed the births. She talks about: birth control, childless women, home remedies, and poetry. She was sorry that she didn't go to college; her parents thought her too frail. Instead, she worked in a knitting factory before her marriage. Her neighbors asked her to teach, but her husband said she couldn't. Inez died in 1989.

  • Thumbnail for Martin, Alta Frances Fox
    Martin, Alta Frances Fox by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Alta came to homestead in the Great Divide (Moffat County) area in 1929 from Brighton, Colorado where she and her husband were farmers. They had seven children. Her husband, John Lawrence, died shortly after they arrived. They also lost a son to Mountain Fever and strep throat. Alta found that the homestead was too much to care for and moved her family to a house near the Great Divide Community Center. She and the children worked at whatever jobs they could find: cleaning the community center, working for other homesteaders, and boarded school teachers and the mailman. They raised much of their own food. The children went to school in the summer at the community school. Alta describes food handling, washing clothes, and making clothing. She also talks about home remedies. Alta died in 1984.