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28 hits

  • Thumbnail for Two Balinese Shadow Puppets (puppet 1)
    Two Balinese Shadow Puppets (puppet 1)

    Height: 50 cm Material: Gilt wood; one wearing silk shot through with gold over cotton petticoats, the other wearing a cotton dress. Balinese puppets came from the small island of Bali. “They are made of painted leather or wood and adorned with splendid garments, mantles, diadems, necklaces...their expressions are either ecstatic or demonic...These figures represent jinn, demons, heroes, and divinities from Indian mythology and legend†(Encyclopedia of World Art). The Bali puppets at Beeghly Library are not the flat-leather puppets (of wayang-kulit) which performed before screens, but are wayang-golek, “a completely rounded wooden figure that was developed in Java, it is less powerful because it is more photographic†(McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Art).

  • Thumbnail for Leather shadow puppet
    Leather shadow puppet

    Tantric sorcery image for use in Wayang Kulit performance. Images of disarticulated body parts are used as talismans in occult Balinese ritual. This would be used in a narrative passage to indicate the casting of a spell by one of the major characters in the story.

  • Thumbnail for Two Balinese Shadow Puppets (puppet 1 face)
    Two Balinese Shadow Puppets (puppet 1 face)

    Height: 50 cm Material: Gilt wood; one wearing silk shot through with gold over cotton petticoats, the other wearing a cotton dress. Balinese puppets came from the small island of Bali. “They are made of painted leather or wood and adorned with splendid garments, mantles, diadems, necklaces...their expressions are either ecstatic or demonic...These figures represent jinn, demons, heroes, and divinities from Indian mythology and legend†(Encyclopedia of World Art). The Bali puppets at Beeghly Library are not the flat-leather puppets (of wayang-kulit) which performed before screens, but are wayang-golek, “a completely rounded wooden figure that was developed in Java, it is less powerful because it is more photographic†(McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Art).

  • Thumbnail for Leather shadow puppet
    Leather shadow puppet

    An unidentified male hero. The only iconographic clue to his specific identity is his dark color, which suggests that this may have served as an image of Kresna (Krishna) in the Mahabharata epic.

  • Thumbnail for Wooden ornament
    Wooden ornament

    It is carved on both sides depicting a female dancer flanked by red and green nagas. Possibly belonging to a musical instrument, a processional vehicle or a temple ornament. Holes drilled beneath the nagas indicate that it was once fastened to a larger assembly.

  • Thumbnail for Winged lion (simha)
    Winged lion (simha)

    Possibly an architectural detail. Carved wood.

  • Thumbnail for Leather shadow puppet
    Leather shadow puppet

    Twalen, one of the Balinese Wayang Kulit clowns.

  • Thumbnail for Balinese male figure
    Balinese male figure

    Part of a set;These are small statues known as pretima or pratima in Bali that likely date to the mid-twentieth century. Such objects are preserved in small temple shrines and taken out in procession on festival occasions. Their specific identities are iconographically unmarked. They are known only through context, community memory and ritual use. On occasions of temple renovation a Brahmana priest sometimes ritually repaints pretima. The male figure appears to have been repainted in this way and the female figure has not. This explains its relatively crude painting by contrast to the more refined painting on the female figure, which would have been done by an artisan at the time of its production.

  • Thumbnail for Leather shadow puppet
    Leather shadow puppet

    An unidentified male hero. The only iconographic clue to his specific identity is his light color, which suggests that this may have served as an image of Lakshman, brother of Rama, in the Ramayana epic.

  • Thumbnail for Leather shadow puppet
    Leather shadow puppet

    A demon attacked by a monkey warrior. To be used in a Wayang Kulit performance of the Ramayana.

  • Thumbnail for Balinese female figure
    Balinese female figure

    Part of a set;These are small statues known as pretima or pratima in Bali that likely date to the mid-twentieth century. Such objects are preserved in small temple shrines and taken out in procession on festival occasions. Their specific identities are iconographically unmarked. They are known only through context, community memory and ritual use. On occasions of temple renovation a Brahmana priest sometimes ritually repaints pretima. The male figure appears to have been repainted in this way and the female figure has not. This explains its relatively crude painting by contrast to the more refined painting on the female figure, which would have been done by an artisan at the time of its production.

  • Thumbnail for Leather shadow puppet
    Leather shadow puppet

    Hanuman, the leader of the monkey army and loyal servant of Rama. This specific image of Hanuman would be used only once in the Wayang Kulit Ramayana performance to represent the episode in which Hanuman flies to Lanka bearing the healing herbs that will enable the distressed monkey army to rally and turn the tide in their epic struggle with the demon army.

  • Thumbnail for Leather shadow puppet
    Leather shadow puppet

    This is a Kayonan or Gunung, representing the cosmic tree/mountain. It is used with a fluttering motion by the puppeteer (dalang) to open and close a performance of the Wayang Kulit. It functions as a cosmic axis, both linking and separating the forces of light and dark, the gods and the demons whose interaction informs the drama of worldly life. Both the tree and mountain indicate the link between the coarse (sakala) world of everyday life and the subtle (niskala) realm of invisible beings made visible to human eyes in the form of flickering shadows. The dalang symbolically invites the audience to metaphorically climb the cosmic tree to the subtle realms above.

  • Thumbnail for Winged lion (simha)
    Winged lion (simha)

    Architectural sculpture (post support).

  • Thumbnail for Leather shadow puppet
    Leather shadow puppet

    Merdah, one of the Balinese Wayang Kulit clowns.

  • Thumbnail for Leather shadow puppet
    Leather shadow puppet

    The monkey king Subali from the Ramayana epic.

  • Thumbnail for Leather shadow puppet
    Leather shadow puppet

    Unidentified heroine.

  • Thumbnail for Architectural sculpture (post support)
  • Thumbnail for Leather shadow puppet
    Leather shadow puppet

    The monkey king Sugriva from the Ramayana epic

  • Thumbnail for Two Balinese Shadow Puppets
    Two Balinese Shadow Puppets

    Height: 50 cm Material: Gilt wood; one wearing silk shot through with gold over cotton petticoats, the other wearing a cotton dress. Balinese puppets came from the small island of Bali. “They are made of painted leather or wood and adorned with splendid garments, mantles, diadems, necklaces...their expressions are either ecstatic or demonic...These figures represent jinn, demons, heroes, and divinities from Indian mythology and legend†(Encyclopedia of World Art). The Bali puppets at Beeghly Library are not the flat-leather puppets (of wayang-kulit) which performed before screens, but are wayang-golek, “a completely rounded wooden figure that was developed in Java, it is less powerful because it is more photographic†(McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Art).

  • Thumbnail for Two Balinese Shadow Puppets (puppet 2)
    Two Balinese Shadow Puppets (puppet 2)

    Height: 50 cm Material: Gilt wood; one wearing silk shot through with gold over cotton petticoats, the other wearing a cotton dress. Balinese puppets came from the small island of Bali. “They are made of painted leather or wood and adorned with splendid garments, mantles, diadems, necklaces...their expressions are either ecstatic or demonic...These figures represent jinn, demons, heroes, and divinities from Indian mythology and legend†(Encyclopedia of World Art). The Bali puppets at Beeghly Library are not the flat-leather puppets (of wayang-kulit) which performed before screens, but are wayang-golek, “a completely rounded wooden figure that was developed in Java, it is less powerful because it is more photographic†(McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Art).

  • Thumbnail for Carved & gilded naga
    Carved & gilded naga

    Said to be the “arm†of a musical instrument.

  • Thumbnail for Leather shadow puppet
    Leather shadow puppet

    Monkey warrior to be used in shadow puppet (Wayang Kulit) performances of the Ramayana epic.

  • Thumbnail for Balinese carvings of entwined nagas
    Balinese carvings of entwined nagas

    Probably supports for musical instruments.

  • Thumbnail for Leather shadow puppet
    Leather shadow puppet

    Monkey warriors to be used in shadow puppet (Wayang Kulit) performances of the Ramayana epic.