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19 hits

  • Thumbnail for Japanese ceramics: Large dish with plant design, E-Shino ware.
    Japanese ceramics: Large dish with plant design, E-Shino ware. by unknown

    This large dish with plant design is an example of the type of Shino known as E-Shino, Pictured Shino. E-Shino pieces feature brush decoration applied to the piece before it is covered with the Shino glaze. The Shino glaze is composed almost entirely of one particular feldspathic rock and produced a great variety of surfaces, depending on how thickly the glaze was applied, the temperature reached in the kiln, and the atmosphere of the kiln (how smoky the fire was during critical phases of the firing). Zoom in on this image to see how lush the Shino surface was on many pieces.

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics: Bottle, Buncheong ware.
    Korean ceramics: Bottle, Buncheong ware. by unknown

    Bottle, stoneware. The form was covered with a white slip applied with a brush. The design on the piece was created by using a sharp tool to cut through the white slip coating, revealing the darker clay underneath, in the manner used in Buncheong ware. The Avery Brundage Collection, B67P41

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics: Dish with handle, Ao-oribe ware, view 02.
    Japanese Ceramics: Dish with handle, Ao-oribe ware, view 02. by unknown

    Another view of the Oribe dish shown in image ecasia000370, showing more clearly the interior of the piece.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese ceramics:  Tea leaf storage jar, Bizen ware.
    Japanese ceramics: Tea leaf storage jar, Bizen ware. by unknown

    Tea leaf storage jar, of modest size (perhaps 12" tall) but strongly articulated as a form. Unglazed stoneware with strong fire markings, characteristic of Bizen ware. Rice straw soaked in sea water salt brine was draped across the form as it was placed in the kiln; at the peak temperatures of the firing, the salt brine would volatilize and combine with the silica in the clay to form an "accidental" natural glaze. This procedure probably was followed initially as a means to keep pieces from fusing to one another in the firing, by separating them with high silica content rice straw, but with the discovery of the result of soaking the straw in brine, it became a frequent decorative technique on Bizen ware. Museum Purchase B67P10

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics:  Fresh water jar, Iga ware.
    Japanese Ceramics: Fresh water jar, Iga ware. by unknown

    This Fresh water jar ("mizusashi") is a tea ceremony vessel, an example of Iga ware, a style of vessel created in Mie Prefecture and valued highly by tea masters. Approximately 9 or 10 inch tall, wheel thrown using a light stoneware clay body, fired in a wood fueled kiln with resulting flashing coloration and some natural ash glaze deposits. The black lid of the jar is lacquer, rather than clay, as was frequently the case with tea vessels. The soft clay was manipulated, probably while the piece was still on the potter's wheel, deliberately deforming the piece slightly, which has the effect of emphasizing the soft, malleable nature of the material before it is fired.

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics: Jar with dragon decoration, porcelain.
    Korean ceramics: Jar with dragon decoration, porcelain. by unknown

    A fairly large porcelain piece, very full in form. The surface of the piece functions as a canvas for the very bold, energetic brush decoration that covers the entire surface. The image is that of a dragon, a frequent theme in east Asian art, twisting as it moves through the air between clouds. The brush decoration is iron oxide applied under the glaze.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese ceramics: Sake bottle by Fujiwara Yu, modern Bizen potter.
    Japanese ceramics: Sake bottle by Fujiwara Yu, modern Bizen potter. by Fujiwara Yu (1932-2001)

    Sake bottle by Fujiwara Yu (1932-2001), a modern potter in Okayama, Bizen. The piece is perhaps 6 inches tall, made of unglazed stoneware. In the lower right, we see a suggestion of uncovered clay, the dense dark iron red that characterizes much Bizen ware. The rest of piece is heavily covered with deposits of ash from the firing and the crustiness of the surface suggests that perhaps the piece was in a part of the kiln where it was completely buried in charcoal during the firing. On loan from an anonymous collector, R2002.51.1

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics: Jar, Buncheong ware.
    Korean ceramics: Jar, Buncheong ware. by unknown

    A modest sized Buncheong ware jar, perhaps 5 inches in height. Stoneware with a white slip that was applied thickly with a coarse brush that left a sense of the gesture of the brush stroke on the surface. The form of this piece calls to mind the similar forms of pieces made in Japan in the 16th century, on the island of Kyushu, by Korean potters, such as those who created Takatori-ware in present-day Fukuoka Prefecture. An example of such a piece may be seen in image soc000146, in the St. Olaf College collection, Asian Take Out. Gift of Mr. Arthur J. McTaggart, 1998.25

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics: Bottle, Buncheong ware.
    Korean ceramics: Bottle, Buncheong ware. by unknown

    Bottle, stoneware. In this example, the decorative technique employed was quite different from the other two Bundheong ware bottles shown here. In this instance, the surface of the piece was stamped with a pattern, perhaps made of fired clay. The surface of the piece was then coated with white slip (porcelain), including the impressed pattern elements. The surface was then scraped clean of the white slip, revealing the darker underlying clay, while the white clay remained in the indentations stamped into the surface, creating the contrasting pattern of light and dark that we see here. The Avery Brundage Collection, B60P388

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics: Dish with Pine Tree, Buncheong-style ware.
    Korean ceramics: Dish with Pine Tree, Buncheong-style ware. by Min Young-ki (1947 - ), potter and Chun Sung-woo (1934 - ), painter

    This large dish is a collaborative piece, created by Min Young-ki, potter, and Chun Sung-woo, painter, both famous contemporary artists. The piece is in the style of Buncheong-ware. In this piece, the dish was created and coated with a white slip (clay in a liquid state); the image of a tall pine tree was painted on top of the white slip, and the piece was then covered with glaze and fired. Gift of Chung Yang-mo, 2004.14

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics: Vase with reeds and egret, buncheong style ware.
    Korean ceramics: Vase with reeds and egret, buncheong style ware. by Park Young-sook (1947 - )

    Vase with reeds and egret, 1998, is a modern piece by Park Young-sook (1947 - ). The simple stoneware form was covered with white slip, which was then drawn through with a sharp tool, revealing the darker clay body beneath. Bits of clay and copper-oxide were added to form the tops of the reeds and the entire piece was then covered with a clear glaze contained a small amount of iron oxide, which produces the light green color, known as celadon. The techniques employed by the artist call deliberately on earlier traditions of Korean pottery, the buncheong tradition of the Joseon (Yi) dynasty (1392-1910). Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Marvin Gordon, 1999.48

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics: Square dish with bird design, Ao-Oribe ware.
    Japanese Ceramics: Square dish with bird design, Ao-Oribe ware. by unknown

    Square dish with bird design, from the Mino region of Gifu Prefecture. Characteristic Ao-Oribe style ware, with brush decoration done in iron oxide under white glaze, with copper green glaze. Museum Purchase B67P8

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics: Dish with handle, Ao-oribe ware, view 01.
    Japanese Ceramics: Dish with handle, Ao-oribe ware, view 01. by unknown

    Oribe ware square dish with a broad handle, from the Mino region of Gifu prefecture, in west cental Honshu, a major pottery region. Light stoneware, probably fired in a neutral atmosphere, iron oxide brushwork decoration under a light glaze, with two corners of the piece and the handle dipped in a copper green glaze, creating the characteristic Oribe glaze pattern. (The Avery Brundage Collection, B64P34)

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics:  Bottle, Buncheong ware.
    Korean ceramics: Bottle, Buncheong ware. by unknown

    Bottle, stoneware. The form was covered with a contrasting white slip. Several horizontal bands were created by incising horizontal lines through the white slip. Within the horizontal bands, areas, defined by those incised lines, the potter or decorator then used brush and iron oxide to paint design motives on the surface, with the glaze then being applied over the decoration. The Avery Brundage Collection, B65P63

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics: Raku Tea bowl, known as "Summer Festival Music."  View from side, showing profile of the piece.
    Japanese Ceramics: Raku Tea bowl, known as "Summer Festival Music." View from side, showing profile of the piece. by attributed to Raku Sonyu

    Raku ware tea bowl ("Chawan") named "Summer Festival Music." The bowl is attributed to Raku Sonyu (1664-1716), the fifth generation of the Kyoto Raku family of potters. A study in understatement, note the gentle undulation of the rim of the bowl and the slight convexity of the contour of the side of the bowl, almost inviting one's hand to fit it. The surface of the piece is typical of the black raku glaze, with a soft, slightly lustrous quality and a slightly pitted surface, giving it a highly tactile quality and one that almost resembles that of a river-worn rock, calling to mind the stricture that a good ceramic piece should be like an object found in nature, rather than an object deliberately made.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese ceramics: Food-serving dish with plant and half wheel design, Gray Shino ware.
    Japanese ceramics: Food-serving dish with plant and half wheel design, Gray Shino ware. by unknown

    Food-serving dish with plant and half wheel design, from Mino region of Gifu Prefecture. Simple wheel thrown form squared off while still in wet state. Museum label describes the piece, technically, as stoneware with inlaid slip. Perhaps the decoration was achieved by coating the entire surface with a dark slip (liquid clay) and then cutting the design through the slip coating to reveal the lighter colored clay of the piece, itself, under the slip. Museum purchase, B76P2

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics: Raku Tea Bowl, "Summer Festival Music."  View showing interior of the bowl.
    Japanese Ceramics: Raku Tea Bowl, "Summer Festival Music." View showing interior of the bowl. by attributed to Raku Sonyu

    A second view of the bowl named, "Summer Festival Music," an Edo period tea bowl attributed to Raku Sonyu, the fifth generation of the Raku family of potters. Interior view of the piece.

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics: Bottle with medallion, porcelain.
    Korean ceramics: Bottle with medallion, porcelain. by unknown

    Bottle, thrown and faceted. The piece is porcelain with characters drawn on the surface with an underglaze cobalt slip or pigment. -- The Avery Brundage Collection, B64P30

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics: Jar in the shape of a barrel, porcelain.
    Korean ceramics: Jar in the shape of a barrel, porcelain. by unknown

    This piece presents an interesting contrast to the elegance of most of the other Korean forms presented here, images ecasia000382 through ecasia000387. This piece is heavy and broadly proportioned when compared with the other bottle forms with their narrow, soaring necks. Technically, it is an interesting piece, having been constructed obviously of three separate pieces. The body of the piece appears to have been formed by throwing two bowl forms which were then joined together, rim to rim, in the same manner as appeared to have been the case with the "Moon Jar" shown in image ecasia000358. The neck of this jar is also a separately thrown piece, a cylindrical form which was joined to the top of the piece to form its neck. The Avery Brundage Collection, B60P926