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  • Thumbnail for Virginia Donaghe McClurg - Poems
    Virginia Donaghe McClurg - Poems by Donaghé, M. Virginia, 1858-1931

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 43, Virginia Donaghe McClurg - Poems include: 2 handwritten sonnets by Virginia Donaghe McClurg, “Colorado 1901” and “Colorado. The Year 2000.”; 1 printed, paperbound copy of A Colorado Wreath by Virginia Donaghe McClurg, a collection of poems and illustrations; 1 reprint of an article by Virginia Donaghe McClurg, “The Mesa Verde Cliff Dwellings and the Women’s Park” with photo of Mrs. McClurg.

  • Thumbnail for Restoration of an alpine disturbance: Differential success of species in turg transplants, Colorado, U.S.A.
    Restoration of an alpine disturbance: Differential success of species in turg transplants, Colorado, U.S.A. by Ebersole, James J. , Conlin, David B.

    Evaluating techniques for restoring alpine environments is important due to increasing human impacts on Colorado mountains. We studied restoration success after 1 yr on an alpine area disturbed by trampling at 3700 m a.s.l., Humboldt Peak, Sangre de Cristo Mountains, Colorado. This area was revegetated in summer 1997 by transplanting pieces of turf cut from a new trail. For both transplants and controls, 100 points were sampled in seventeen 70 X 70 cm plots. Vascular plant species richness did not differ between transplant and control plots. Thirtyone species showed absolute covers not significantly different between transplant and control plots, and twelve species had higher covers in control plots or showed a strong trend in that direction. Sums of covers of all species declined by 35% in transplant plots. Transplant and control plots had differential relative success of some important species as measured by relative cover although almost all differences were small. Grasses increased moderately and forbs declined by 9%. Relative cover of the dominant, Geum rossii, as well as two common graminoids, Carex phaeocephala and Trisetum spicatum, decreased in transplant plots. The forbs Polygonum bistortoides and Potentilla subjuga increased in relative cover in transplant plots; one of the dominant species, Carex elynoides, and many secondary species, were not different between treatments. Success in total cover and of almost all species after 1 yr indicates turf-transplants work well in this community and should be employed to restore other damaged alpine areas when feasible.

  • Thumbnail for A Year of Listening : exploring new heights at Colorado College
    A Year of Listening : exploring new heights at Colorado College by Tiefenthaler, Jill

    Article on findings from Colorado College President Jill Tiefenthaler's "Year of Listening."

  • Thumbnail for Aaron Cohick to Judge Book Arts Competition
    Aaron Cohick to Judge Book Arts Competition

    An article celebrating Aaron Cohick's participation as a juror in the Minnesota Center for Book Arts 2015 Book Art Biennial.

  • Thumbnail for Sustainable collaborations : libraries link dual-credit programs to P-20 initiatives
    Sustainable collaborations : libraries link dual-credit programs to P-20 initiatives by Frank, Katherine , Bruch, Courtney

    This article argues for collaboration among academic libraries, academic departments, and high schools in order to strengthen articulation between the secondary and post-secondary sectors. It features work from a year-long project made possible by an LSTA grant and involving the Colorado State University-Pueblo Library, the English Composition Program, and several southern Colorado high schools that participate in the University’s dual-credit program titled “Senior-to-Sophomore.” This article outlines the process of using information literacy (IL) instruction to foster relationships among secondary and post-secondary instructors, improve communication between instructors and library staff within both sectors, and ultimately strengthen teaching and learning. Major challenges to an ongoing successful partnership include resources and program sustainability. The ultimate benefit, however, is the cross-institutional partnerships focused on IL instruction that benefit not only secondary to post-secondary articulation, but also the entire pre-school through graduate level (P-20) educational continuum.

  • Thumbnail for “Mendeley” : a review
    “Mendeley” : a review by Hicks, Alison

    Alison Hicks reviews the website Mendeley. Mendeley (http://www.mendeley.com/) is a free reference manager and academic social network that can help organize research, collaborate online, and discover the latest research.

  • Thumbnail for Two approaches to collaborative information literacy instruction at a small engineering school
    Two approaches to collaborative information literacy instruction at a small engineering school by Cote, Conor , Juskiewicz, Scott

    Two librarians at a small STEM academic library have partnered with professors to develop and teach chemistry and writing courses. These librarians have successfully worked with professors to serve as an active presence within the classroom. This article describes the challenges of navigating the typical obstacles librarians face when attempting to integrate information literacy into the curriculum, reflects on the benefits of these collaborations, and touches on strategies for implementing similar programs at other institutions. It outlines two distinct approaches to collaborating with professors on credit-bearing information literacy courses, along with the key steps involved in planning and implementing these courses, including generating institutional buy-in, identifying potential collaborators, negotiating workload and responsibilities with collaborators, and planning to sustain courses beyond a single academic year. Suggestions for overcoming obstacles, supplemented by experience-based recommendations are discussed.

  • Thumbnail for Library collaboration : international perspectives : an interview with Dr. Shimelis Assefa, Associate Professor, Library and Inf
    Library collaboration : international perspectives : an interview with Dr. Shimelis Assefa, Associate Professor, Library and Inf by Lee, Janet

    In conversation with Janet Lee, Dean of Libraries, Regis University, Dr. Shimelis Assefa, University of Denver, discusses aspects of library collaboration from an international perspective that cover both challenges and opportunities. Insights on collaboration in library science education are also offered.

  • Thumbnail for Campus collaboration from a martial arts perspective
    Campus collaboration from a martial arts perspective by Perini, Michael

    Thinkers have been applying longstanding martial arts philosophies to a variety of professional genres for years, particularly in the business realm. Where these ideas find less traction, though, is in the field of education, specifically higher education, as some of the philosophies operate better in the boardroom than in academe. However, much of the experience associated with martial arts provides an alternate prism to view conflicts and difficulties within higher education and, specifically, for my purposes, in libraries. This discussion draws on my experience as a martial artist as well as my theoretical and experiential learning in higher education and academic libraries in order to expand the conversation on collaboration.

  • Thumbnail for Library faculty and instructional assessment : creating a culture of  assessment through the High Performance Programming model
    Library faculty and instructional assessment : creating a culture of assessment through the High Performance Programming model by Farkas, Meredith G., 1977- , Hinchliffe, Lisa Janicke

    In an environment in which libraries increasingly need to demonstrate their value to faculty and administrators, providing evidence of the library’s contribution to student learning through its instruction program is critical. However, building a culture of assessment can be a challenge, even if librarians recognize its importance. In order to lead change, coordinators of library instruction at institutions where librarians are also tenure-track faculty must build trust and collaboration, lead through influence, and garner support from administration for assessment initiatives. The purpose of this paper is to explore what it takes to build a culture of assessment in academic libraries where librarians are faculty through the High Performance Programming model of organizational change. The guidelines for building a culture of assessment will be exemplified by case studies at the authors’ libraries where instruction coordinators are using collaboration to build a culture of assessment with their colleagues.

  • Thumbnail for Alliances, partnerships and an Ethiopian journey : the story of  Mekelle’s children’s library
    Alliances, partnerships and an Ethiopian journey : the story of Mekelle’s children’s library by Lee, Janet

    Janet Lee, Technical Services Librarian and Associate Professor, Regis University, devoted her sabbatical leave for joining Yohannes Gebregeorgis, 2008 CNN Hero, and establishing the Segenat Children and Youth Library in Mekelle, Ethiopia. Lee discusses successes and challenges in setting up a library in a developing country.

  • Thumbnail for Crossing borders : two academic librarians and a young adult librarian collaborate to teach teens about sustainability
    Crossing borders : two academic librarians and a young adult librarian collaborate to teach teens about sustainability by Aulisio, George J. , McHugh, Sheli

    Two academic librarians from The University of Scranton’s Weinberg Memorial Library partnered with a young adult librarian from the Scranton Public Library to help plan, organize, and implement, a sustainability themed summer series of events for a teen group. This paper discusses experiences of collaborating across traditional library boundaries from perspectives of a technical services librarian, an academic reference librarian, and a young adult librarian united to work together and educate teens about going green. Various resources and literature helped build a successful summer series on sustainability and demonstrated the important role librarians can play in promoting related environmental issues. The project also formed a meaningful bond between a public librarian and two academic librarians.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Common ground at the nexus of information literacy and scholarly communication
    Review of Common ground at the nexus of information literacy and scholarly communication by Calkins, Kaijsa

    Kaijsa Calkins reviews, "Common Ground at the Nexus of Information Literacy and Scholarly Communication" edited by Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Merinda Kaye Hensley. This book brings together an excellent collection of writing by librarians, disciplinary faculty, and others from a wide variety of higher education settings that address the intersections between scholarly communication and information literacy instruction initiatives.

  • Thumbnail for Review of connect, collaborate, and communicate : a report from the value of academic libraries summits
    Review of connect, collaborate, and communicate : a report from the value of academic libraries summits by Hardy, Martha E.

    Martha E. Hardy reviews "Connect, Collaborate, and Communicate : A Report from the Value of Academic Libraries Summits." This report prepared by Karen Brown and Kara J. Malenfant, highlights the crucial importance of demonstrating and communicating the value of academic libraries and their impact on student learning, plus recommendations for action.

  • Thumbnail for RFID, GPS, and 3G : radio wave technologies and privacy
    RFID, GPS, and 3G : radio wave technologies and privacy by Ayre, Lori Bowen

    Lori Bowen Ayre discusses technology and convenience versus privacy.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Voyant Tools
    Review of Voyant Tools by Welsh, Megan E.

    Megan Welsh reviews Voyant Tools. Voyant Tools (http://voyant-tools.org/), a text analysis tool through which the written word can be understood in new ways. Voyant Tools is a free, versatile suite of web-based, text analysis and visualization tools.

  • Thumbnail for Whose job is it anyway?
  • Thumbnail for Review : Embedded librarians : moving beyond one-shot instruction
    Review : Embedded librarians : moving beyond one-shot instruction by Vella, Lia

    Lia Vella reviews the book, "Embedded Librarians: Moving Beyond One-Shot Instruction." This book is edited by Cassandra Kvenild and Kaijsa Calkins. In her review, Vella shares, "For the first time last year, my library tried an “embedded” relationship with a required freshman class. As a Reference & Instruction Librarian, I attended the lectures, worked with each of the class sections, and created and staffed a “Help Station” with a rotating display of relevant books and articles. This book, Embedded Librarians: Moving Beyond One-Shot Instruction, was, therefore, of interest to me and helped me to formulate ideas about how I wanted to implement my own program."

  • Thumbnail for Creating NISO’s library physical delivery recommended practices
    Creating NISO’s library physical delivery recommended practices by Horton, Valerie , Pronevitz, Gregory

    The volume of materials shipped between libraries and branches has grown very quickly. This growth caused service and budget problems for libraries, library networks, and commercial couriers. NISO formed a working group comprised of practitioners from various types of libraries and systems to recommend practices to improve performance and reduce costs for moving physical materials between libraries. The recommended practices include an introduction and sections related to management, automation, the physical move, and the future. In addition to describing the recommended practices, the authors briefly review the cause of the growth in library delivery volume, i.e., the development of patron-placed hold capability in integrated library systems and the issues and reactions in the library delivery community resulting from the rapid growth, as well as prospects for a future with declining delivery volume.

  • Thumbnail for By and for us : the development of a program for peer review of teaching by and for pre-tenure librarians
    By and for us : the development of a program for peer review of teaching by and for pre-tenure librarians by Miller, Willie , Alabi, Jaena , Snajdr, Eric , Lacy, Meagan , Weare, William H., Jr. , Huisman, Rhonda , Trinoskey, Jessica

    Seven pre-tenure librarians at the University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) created a peer review of teaching (PROT) group. This article provides an overview of the library literature on PROT and identifies the commonalities and variations found in PROT programs. The development, implementation, and benefits of the PROT program at IUPUI are discussed as well as out-comes pertaining to benefits for the observed, the observer, and for the PROT group as a whole. The authors also found that the implementation of a PROT program can enhance the sense of community among colleagues.

  • Thumbnail for Tribute to a cooperative pioneer : Bill DeJohn
    Tribute to a cooperative pioneer : Bill DeJohn by Boone, Cecelia N.

    Cecelia Boone reflects on the influential career of William T. “Bill” DeJohn, whose 50-year career in library collaboration ranged across the United States from Missouri to Illinois to Washington State. He retired at the age of 71 after more than 27 years as director of Minitex, a consortium serving all types of libraries in Minnesota and the Dakotas. Bill died Dec. 31, 2012, after a short illness – 11 months after his retirement.

  • Thumbnail for Co-teaching relationships among librarians and other information professionals
    Co-teaching relationships among librarians and other information professionals by Shannon, Amy W. , Medaille, Ann

    This article uses the co-teaching experiences of workshop instructors at the University of Nevada, Reno Libraries as a basis for an in-depth exploration of the factors that lead to successful co-teaching arrangements among librarians and other information professionals. The experiences of these instructors demonstrate that co-teaching can provide numerous benefits: It can enhance the learning experience for students, it can provide a method for refining teaching skills, it can promote successful collaborations across departments, and it can bring innovative ideas into the classroom. Drawing on collaboration research from the Wilder Foundation, this study found that successful co-teaching relationships are characterized by factors related to environment, partnerships, process and structure, communication, purpose, resources, and external/long-term considerations. Within these seven areas, guidelines for successful co-teaching relationships have been formulated for use by librarians and other information professionals.

  • Thumbnail for Review : Without a net : librarians bridging the digital divide
    Review : Without a net : librarians bridging the digital divide by Stoddart, Rick

    Rick Stoddart reviews the book, "Without a Net : Librarians Bridging the Digital Divide." In this review, Stoddard states that Jessamyn West "has written a sorely needed primer on the practical issues many libraries may encounter related to the digital divide and their patrons."

  • Thumbnail for NISO and collaboration : a place at the table for all players
    NISO and collaboration : a place at the table for all players by Horton, Valerie , Carpenter, Todd

    Todd Carpenter, the Managing Director of NISO, the National Information Standards Organization, is a leading player in promoting research through the creation of standard and best practices related to information exchange and management. NISO provides the environment for bringing key organizations together to reach complex and often difficult agreements. As Carpenter says, “One of NISO’s most important principles is ensuring all the relevant players have an opportunity to sit at the table, in an open and fostering environment that is supported by participatory and well-established rules for engagement.” This interview is part of a series of conversations with members of Collaborative Librarianship’s Advisory Board.

  • Thumbnail for Independent study equals instant collaboration
    Independent study equals instant collaboration by Peters, Alison

    This is the story of two LIS students, distance-challenged virtual strangers, who came together and found that success is a shared recipe, and collaboration is a gift that leads to greater things.