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  • Thumbnail for Day and Night Nursery Association - Jessie Adella Aiken
    Day and Night Nursery Association - Jessie Adella Aiken by Aiken, Jessie Adella

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 68, Day and Night Nursery Association - Jessie Adella Aiken include: 1 7-page, handwritten letter, dated August, 1901, describing the Day and Night Nursery Association of Colorado Springs, signed by Jessie Adella Aiken, Treasurer; 1 printed copy of the article “Where the Little Ones Find Comfort and Care” from the Colorado Telegraph, Sunday, June 23, 1901; 1 newspaper reprint of a photo of Mrs. G. W. Lawrence, President of the Nursery Association; 1 b&w photo “Jessie A. Aiken.”

  • Thumbnail for Literary homecoming as collaboration :  Eastern North Carolina libraries connect with the creative sector
    Literary homecoming as collaboration : Eastern North Carolina libraries connect with the creative sector by Tennent, Blythe , Bauer, Margaret Donovan, 1963- , Cook, Eleanor I.

    This article describes an academic library’s experience developing and sustaining a literary festival as a collaborative effort. The Eastern North Carolina Literary Homecoming (ENCLH) is a year-long program of events that celebrates the culture and literature of North Carolina. With activities in 6 counties located in the mid-coastal region of North Carolina, the program provides a rich opportunity for people of this area to learn about and meet North Carolina artists. In the past the program was restricted to artists with connections to Eastern North Carolina, but the program is expanding its coverage in 2011. The program theme for 2011 will focus on the impact of environmental literature on social change. This event has been a successful collaboration between a number of cultural institutions, with Joyner Library at East Carolina University serving as the lead. Federal, state and private grant funding has been secured for several years. Key players in the mix include the editor and staff of the North Carolina Literary Review, along with staff from the local public library and members of the ECU faculty as well as librarians from other regional schools.

  • Thumbnail for The collaborative face of consortia : Collaborative Librarianship interviews Timothy Cherubini, Director for East Region Program
    The collaborative face of consortia : Collaborative Librarianship interviews Timothy Cherubini, Director for East Region Program by Kraus, Joseph R. , Cherubini, Timothy

    “Consortia are important players in the library collaborative process.” There is unlikely to be resistance to such a statement from most corners of our profession, yet what moves people (librarians and others) to positions with consortia—and what they do when they arrive there—remains a somewhat unexamined path. In this article, Collaborative Librarianship’s Joe Kraus discussed with Tim Cherubini, LYRASIS’ Director for East Region Programs, his personal experiences in positions with academic libraries as well as consortia and his movement between the two related but distinct environments. This interview is part of a series of conversations with members of Collaborative Librarianship’s Advisory Board.

  • Thumbnail for Peers don’t let peers perish : encouraging research and scholarship among junior library faculty
    Peers don’t let peers perish : encouraging research and scholarship among junior library faculty by Smale, Maura A. , Cirasella, Jill

    Traditional mentoring has many benefits, but peer mentoring can also offer a valuable support structure along the road to tenure. The Junior Faculty Research Roundtable (JFRR) is a peer-mentoring group for junior library faculty at the colleges and graduate schools of the City University of New York (CUNY). Created to encourage junior library faculty in their scholarly endeavors, JFRR organizes professional development events and facilitates in-person and online conversations on research, writing, and publishing. Now three years old, the group has transformed a large number of scattered junior library faculty into a supportive community of scholars.

  • Thumbnail for Collaborative marketing for electronic resources :  a project report and discussion
    Collaborative marketing for electronic resources : a project report and discussion by Kennedy, Marie R.

    This article reports on the design and findings of a project concerning the feasibility of a collaborative model to benchmark the marketing of electronic resources in institutions of higher education. This international project gathered 100 libraries to move in lockstep through the process of a typical marketing cycle that included running a brief marketing campaign and reporting findings to each other. The findings show good reasons and strong support for this kind of model.

  • Thumbnail for Betwixt and between collaborative online spaces : editing and publishing a collection of essays
    Betwixt and between collaborative online spaces : editing and publishing a collection of essays by Tolley-Stokes, Rebecca, 1971-

    Rebecca Tolley-Stokes reviews several online tools that allowed her and her co-editors, who were separated by distance, to collaborate on their project and bring it to fruition.

  • Thumbnail for  Collaboration in the community
    Collaboration in the community by Engard, Nicole C., 1979-

    On a regular basis, Nicole Engard contributes to Collaborative Librarianship. In this article, Nichole Engard discusses the value of collaborating in our communities.

  • Thumbnail for Planning from the middle out : Phase 1 of 2CUL Technical Services Integration
    Planning from the middle out : Phase 1 of 2CUL Technical Services Integration by LeBlanc, Jim , Harcourt, Kate

    The Columbia and Cornell University Libraries’ partnership is now in its fourth year. Its composite acronym (2CUL), which condenses a doubling of the two participating libraries’ initial letters, in itself reflects the very nature of the collaboration’s strategic purpose: a broad integration of library activities in a number of areas – including collection development, acquisitions and cataloging, e-resources and digital management, and digital preservation. In what is perhaps their boldest, most ambitious 2CUL initiative to date, the two libraries have begun planning for and have taken the first steps towards an integration of their substantial technical services operations. In this paper, the authors outline the goals of 2CUL Technical Services Integration (TSI), report on the first phase of the work, reflect on what they have learned so far in planning for this operational union, and look forward to the next steps of the project in which the two institutions will initiate incrementally the functional integration of the two divisions. The period covered in Phase 1 of TSI is September 2012-December 2013.

  • Thumbnail for Assessment of library instruction on undergraduate student success in a documents-based research course : the benefits of librar
    Assessment of library instruction on undergraduate student success in a documents-based research course : the benefits of librar by Otto, Justin , Victor, Paul, Jr. , Mutschler, Chas. V., (Charles Vincent), 1955-

    This article discusses a successful collaboration between multiple subject specialist librarians, the University Archivist and a faculty member teaching an undergraduate course in documents-based social science research. This collaborative partnership allowed for each subject specialist to expose students to specific information literacy skills they needed to be successful in their class. The authors used pre- and post-assessments to gauge student comfort level in conducting library research, as well as a rubric to assess the annotated bibliography of a student’s final research paper. The data from these assessment tools are analyzed and the results discussed. The data indicates that students benefited from the specialized instruction they received.

  • Thumbnail for Just the two of us : those who co-teach, co-learn
    Just the two of us : those who co-teach, co-learn by Matlin, Talitha R. , Carr, Allison

    Teaching librarians are always seeking opportunities to improve their professional practice. Traditional forms of professional and personal development—attending workshops and conferences and reading the scholarly and practitioner literature—are valuable and useful, but often ignore the powerful personal connections we have between colleagues. Using a narrative approach, this article will provide two teacher librarians’ stories about their experiences with team teaching as a method of professional development. Turning the traditional mentorship model on its head, each librarian contributed equally to the relationship and took the risk of being vulnerable in order to learn from one another. A newer librarian, looking to expand her teaching toolkit, become acculturated to her new institution, and develop her teacher identity, taught alongside an experienced librarian looking for new teaching techniques, a way to prevent “burnout,” and a more intentional and reflective approach to teaching. In addition, the authors will discuss the theoretical underpinnings of the benefits of team teaching and will provide recommendations for others through an account of how they planned, managed the classroom, and assessed student work.

  • Thumbnail for Collaboration for a 21st century archives : connecting university archives with the library’s information technology professiona
    Collaboration for a 21st century archives : connecting university archives with the library’s information technology professiona by Lawrimore, Erin

    As communication technologies change, so do the records being produced and acquired by the archival repositories tasked with documenting society. This article, written from the perspective of a University Archivist, discusses the need for collaboration between archivists and information technology professionals in a university library in order to manage the university’s born-digital archival records. Using specific examples of collaborative projects of University Archives and the Electronic Resources and Information Technology (ERIT) department in the University Libraries of The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, the article makes specific recommendations for overcoming challenges related to professional jargon and work practices shared by archivists and information technologists to produce a successful collaboration.

  • Thumbnail for The quest for sustainability in international library development : the experience of the Riecken Foundation
    The quest for sustainability in international library development : the experience of the Riecken Foundation by Cramer, Elizabeth , Boyd, John

    The Riecken Foundation provides support to communities in developing countries to create sustainable partnership library programs focusing on collection development, technology applications, and assembling professional staff and volunteers. This article studies the experience of the Foundation through research gathered in interviews with Bill Cartwright, President and CEO of the Foundation, along with on-site observations at six participating libraries, and offers analysis of documentation related to these sustainability initiatives. The study also examines the transition of the Foundation from a private foundation to a public charity and the effect this has had in its programming.

  • Thumbnail for Review of connect, collaborate, and communicate : a report from the value of academic libraries summits
    Review of connect, collaborate, and communicate : a report from the value of academic libraries summits by Hardy, Martha E.

    Martha E. Hardy reviews "Connect, Collaborate, and Communicate : A Report from the Value of Academic Libraries Summits." This report prepared by Karen Brown and Kara J. Malenfant, highlights the crucial importance of demonstrating and communicating the value of academic libraries and their impact on student learning, plus recommendations for action.

  • Thumbnail for Review of “The bookless library,” New Republic
    Review of “The bookless library,” New Republic by Mackey, Ellen

    Ellen Mackey reviews Princeton history professor David Bell’s article “The Bookless Library” http://www.newrepublic.com/article/books-and-arts/magazine/david-bell-future-bookless-library#, July 12, 2002, accessed July 31, 2012. In this article, the question is asked, “What role will libraries have when patrons no longer need to go to them to consult or borrow books?”

  • Thumbnail for  Review of Managing research data
    Review of Managing research data by Salo, Dorothea, 1972-

    Dorothea Salo reviews "Managing Research Data" edited by Graham Pryor. This volume aims at providing a high-level snapshot of the current state of the art in research-data policy, planning, management, and preservation. While few readers will find occasion to read every piece included, almost everyone in research libraries will find one or more articles of considerable interest.

  • Thumbnail for Incorporating existing library partnerships into Open Access Week events
    Incorporating existing library partnerships into Open Access Week events by Wirth, Andrea A.

    Oregon State University (OSU) Libraries participated in Open Access (OA) Week in 2009 and 2010. In order to expand the range of events offered, the committee members assigned to program planning looked for opportunities to work with partners beyond the library. The collaborative activities developed through these partnerships created settings for in-depth conversations among librarians, faculty, and students about scholarly communication issues. Subject librarians’ relationships with their departments provided opportunities to host events in venues other than the library, which helped, facilitate access to a diverse audience. An established cooperative relationship with the University of Oregon made it possible to provide additional presentations to the OSU community. An evaluation of the quantity and quality of contacts made during OA Week suggests the collaborative activities enriched these outreach activities and that participation in OA Week is worthwhile for OSU Libraries to continue.

  • Thumbnail for Collaborative project development in the creation of an interdepartmental digitization workflow
    Collaborative project development in the creation of an interdepartmental digitization workflow by Prilop, Valerie , German, Elizabeth M. , Westbrook, R. Niccole

    Creating workflows that involve the work of multiple departments within a large organization can be challenging, especially when the procedure itself is complex and involves a number of stakeholders. This paper describes and evaluates a collaborative project to develop an interdepartmental workflow for the digitization of unique library materials in a mid-sized academic library. The project includes an automated project management and materials tracking system. Project development involved three separate departments with different reporting channels. In order to navigate this difficulty and manage the large size of the project, a visual planning technique that included graphical representations of current and proposed workflows, as well as implementation timelines, was used. This visual planning technique allowed the project team to clearly organize their thoughts and plans and proved helpful in soliciting buy-in from stakeholders. The paper will outline the collaborative planning process, addressing the rewards and challenges of tackling such a project within a large organization, and present lessons learned for others attempting similar endeavors.

  • Thumbnail for Expanding effective 21st century access to historical and academic materials : examples, strategies and implications
    Expanding effective 21st century access to historical and academic materials : examples, strategies and implications by Morris, Carolyn , Davis, Mitchell

    Given the capabilities for digitization that have emerged in recent years along with mobile access to the Internet, new library and business partnerships are now not only possible but also compelling in various ways. HTML5 web apps now make available library collections that historically have been closed or difficult to access. A partnership involving The British Library, Microsoft and BiblioLabs realizes some of these new potentials.

  • Thumbnail for Extending access to electronic resources of a merged community college and university library
    Extending access to electronic resources of a merged community college and university library by Dresselhaus, Angela

    Utah State University and the College of Eastern Utah merged in July 2010, necessitating the renegotiation of all electronic resource licenses. The author discusses the process of renegotiating licenses, providing access to electronic collections remotely, troubleshooting and other important areas regarding libraries and mergers in higher education. This paper will provide an Electronic Resource Merger Guide to assist future library mergers.

  • Thumbnail for Among the angels? Exploring collaborations of the American Theological Library Association : an interview with David Stewart
    Among the angels? Exploring collaborations of the American Theological Library Association : an interview with David Stewart by Stewart, David R. , Gaetz, Ivan

    David Stewart, past President of the American Theological Library Association, reflects on various collaborative initiatives of ATLA. Collaborative Librarianship interviewed David Stewart, Director of Libraries, Bethel University, Saint Paul, MN, and a member of CL’s Advisory Board, on the nature, challenges and opportunities for collaboration in a subject-focused, special academic library organization. This interview is part of a series of conversations with members of Collaborative Librarianship’s Advisory Board.

  • Thumbnail for Milestones in collaboration
    Milestones in collaboration by Gaetz, Ivan

    With this issue, Collaborative Librarianship begins its fourth year of publication. The reasons for beginning the Journal continue to be relevant today, and perhaps even more compelling. In the time leading up to volume 1, number 1, (January 2009), we recognized that collaboration is a fundamental value in the practice of librarianship and that it takes many forms, from in-house to consortia cooperatives and beyond.

  • Thumbnail for Social bookmarking sites : a review
    Social bookmarking sites : a review by Barnes, Laura L.

    Laura Barnes reviews social bookmarking sites. Social bookmarking tools allow users to store, manage, search, organize, and share their bookmarks online and access them from anywhere.

  • Thumbnail for Evolving in collaboration : electronic thesis and dissertation workflows in North Carolina
    Evolving in collaboration : electronic thesis and dissertation workflows in North Carolina by Taber, Ann Marie , Early, Mary G.

    Thirty-seven colleges and universities in North Carolina offer advanced degrees, and most require a thesis or dissertation. The websites of thirteen (35%) indicate they accept or require electronic submission of dissertations and/or theses (ETD). How do these institutions handle the interdepartmental communication and collaboration needs of ETD programs? To begin answering this question, this study examines current practices among ETD administrators in North Carolina and in current national literature, paying special attention to communication, collaboration, workflows, and divisions of labor. The literature review surveys current (since 2003) library and higher education articles on topics related to collaboration, workflows, and divisions of labor in ETD programs. Then the authors use a brief web survey (sixteen questions) that was emailed to twenty-three individuals identified on institutional websites as being involved in the ETD program. Fifty percent of recipients completed the survey, and the results tend to support common themes found in the literature: ETD depositories require a great variety of skill sets and thus will involve multiple departments; libraries and graduate schools are primary players, but not exclusively, in ETD workflows; and communication and collaboration between departments are important from start to finish.

  • Thumbnail for LYRASIS : a  collaborative success story
    LYRASIS : a collaborative success story by Anderson, Kathy

    As LYRASIS ended its groundbreaking first year, they conducted in-depth personal interviews with the library pioneers and change agents who participated in the creation of the nation’s largest membership organization serving libraries and information professionals, formed from legacy organizations in the Mid-Atlantic region (PALINET), the Southeastern region (SOLINET), and the New England region (NELINET). LYRASIS was a watershed in library collaboration, unprecedented in scale and with far-reaching industry implications. The key participants in this venture – from varied libraries across a wide geographic area - offer unique viewpoints on the process of creating a new organization that was not just bigger, but entirely new in its vision and scope. Excerpts are taken from interviews with participants, about their roles at the time, including Carol Pitts Diedrichs (formerly SOLINET Board Chair), Arnold Hirshon (formerly NELINET Executive Director), W. Lee Hisle (formerly NELINET Board Chair), Joe Lucia (formerly PALINET Board Chair), Richard Madaus (formerly SOLINET Board Member), Kate Nevins (formerly SOLINET Executive Director), and Cathy Wilt (formerly PALINET Executive Director). In sharing their perspectives on the collaboration, these leaders offer new ways of thinking about library collaboration and insights into the future for all libraries.

  • Thumbnail for Regional and national cooperation on legacy print collections
    Regional and national cooperation on legacy print collections by Kieft, Robert Henry , Reilly, Bernard F.

    Reports on a meeting convened by the Center for Research Libraries on July 10, 2009, in Chicago for representatives of more than a dozen library consortia and other organizations with an interest in shaping a national approach to long-term preservation of and access to print collections.