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  • Thumbnail for Literary homecoming as collaboration :  Eastern North Carolina libraries connect with the creative sector
    Literary homecoming as collaboration : Eastern North Carolina libraries connect with the creative sector by Cook, Eleanor I. , Bauer, Margaret Donovan, 1963- , Tennent, Blythe

    This article describes an academic library’s experience developing and sustaining a literary festival as a collaborative effort. The Eastern North Carolina Literary Homecoming (ENCLH) is a year-long program of events that celebrates the culture and literature of North Carolina. With activities in 6 counties located in the mid-coastal region of North Carolina, the program provides a rich opportunity for people of this area to learn about and meet North Carolina artists. In the past the program was restricted to artists with connections to Eastern North Carolina, but the program is expanding its coverage in 2011. The program theme for 2011 will focus on the impact of environmental literature on social change. This event has been a successful collaboration between a number of cultural institutions, with Joyner Library at East Carolina University serving as the lead. Federal, state and private grant funding has been secured for several years. Key players in the mix include the editor and staff of the North Carolina Literary Review, along with staff from the local public library and members of the ECU faculty as well as librarians from other regional schools.

  • Thumbnail for Creating undergraduate internships for non-LIS  students in academic libraries
    Creating undergraduate internships for non-LIS students in academic libraries by Dahl, Candice

    This paper provides a framework for creating undergraduate internships in academic libraries, specifically those offered in collaboration with subject-based academic departments at universities where no degrees in library science are offered. Very little of the scholarly literature addresses this type of internship in particular, and broadly applicable elements of planning and implementation have not been clearly articulated in the literature. This paper proposes that there are several basic elements to consider regardless of situation-specific conditions. These include incentives and compensation for the intern, structure of the internship, projects, and documentation. Each element is considered and described, using internships hosted at the Murray Library of the University of Saskatchewan as examples.

  • Thumbnail for A window on library collaboration in Southeast Asia : insights and perspectives of Lourdes T. David
    A window on library collaboration in Southeast Asia : insights and perspectives of Lourdes T. David by David, Lourdes T.

    Collaborative Librarianship Advisory Board Member, Lourdes T. David, provides an overview of library collaboration in the Philippines and in other countries in Southeast Asia. This interview is part of a series of conversations with members of Collaborative Librarianship’s Advisory Board.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Interdisciplinarity and academic libraries
    Review of Interdisciplinarity and academic libraries by O'Neill, Ann L.

    Ann L. O’Neill reviews, "Interdisciplinarity and Academic Libraries." This book examines the definition of interdisciplinarity and the related terms of multidisciplinarity, transdisciplinarity and cross-disciplinarity and how these can, and have, affected the work in academic libraries. The ten essays range from definitions and history of interdisciplinarity to the work implications in specific areas of today’s academic libraries.

  • Thumbnail for A tribute to Alan Charnes
    A tribute to Alan Charnes by Machovec, George

    Friends and colleagues offer words of tribute and good wishes on the August 2011 retirement of Alan Charnes, Executive Director of the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries.

  • Thumbnail for Whither ILL? Wither ILL : the changing nature of  resource sharing for e-books
    Whither ILL? Wither ILL : the changing nature of resource sharing for e-books by Levine-Clark, Michael

    In this editorial, Michael Levine-Clark shares his thoughts on the changing nature of resource sharing for e-books.

  • Thumbnail for Library faculty and instructional assessment : creating a culture of  assessment through the High Performance Programming model
    Library faculty and instructional assessment : creating a culture of assessment through the High Performance Programming model by Hinchliffe, Lisa Janicke , Farkas, Meredith G., 1977-

    In an environment in which libraries increasingly need to demonstrate their value to faculty and administrators, providing evidence of the library’s contribution to student learning through its instruction program is critical. However, building a culture of assessment can be a challenge, even if librarians recognize its importance. In order to lead change, coordinators of library instruction at institutions where librarians are also tenure-track faculty must build trust and collaboration, lead through influence, and garner support from administration for assessment initiatives. The purpose of this paper is to explore what it takes to build a culture of assessment in academic libraries where librarians are faculty through the High Performance Programming model of organizational change. The guidelines for building a culture of assessment will be exemplified by case studies at the authors’ libraries where instruction coordinators are using collaboration to build a culture of assessment with their colleagues.

  • Thumbnail for Assessment of library instruction on undergraduate student success in a documents-based research course : the benefits of librar
    Assessment of library instruction on undergraduate student success in a documents-based research course : the benefits of librar by Otto, Justin , Victor, Paul, Jr. , Mutschler, Chas. V., (Charles Vincent), 1955-

    This article discusses a successful collaboration between multiple subject specialist librarians, the University Archivist and a faculty member teaching an undergraduate course in documents-based social science research. This collaborative partnership allowed for each subject specialist to expose students to specific information literacy skills they needed to be successful in their class. The authors used pre- and post-assessments to gauge student comfort level in conducting library research, as well as a rubric to assess the annotated bibliography of a student’s final research paper. The data from these assessment tools are analyzed and the results discussed. The data indicates that students benefited from the specialized instruction they received.

  • Thumbnail for Toward improved discoverability of scholarly content : cross-sector collaboration essentials
    Toward improved discoverability of scholarly content : cross-sector collaboration essentials by Conrad, Lettie Y. , Somerville, Mary M.

    By way of follow-up to earlier work in understanding and improving discoverability of scholarly content, this article reports on recent data and reflections that led to clearer definitions of discovery and discoverability, as well as deeper cross-sector collaborations on standards, transparency, metadata, and new forms of partnerships. Recent advances in discoverability are also described - from enhanced library-based web-scale searching to serving researcher needs through the Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID) registry. The article points to a 2014 SAGE white paper that presents in greater detail opportunities for wider collaboration among libraries, publishers, service providers, and researchers in the inter-est of furthering discovery, access, and usage of scholarly writings and creative work.

  • Thumbnail for “She has a vocabulary I just don’t have” : faculty culture and information literacy collaboration
    “She has a vocabulary I just don’t have” : faculty culture and information literacy collaboration by Gardner, Carolyn Caffrey , White-Farnham, Jamie

    The authors describe difficulties pertaining to discipline-specific discourse and identity among collaborators during the process of revising the information literacy component of a first-year writing program. Hardesty’s term “faculty culture” offers a frame through which to understand resistance and tension among otherwise engaged faculty and situates this experience within the uncomfortable history between faculty and librarians who may be perceived as “inauthentic” faculty. The authors suggest ways to improve communication between librarians and writing program faculty when collaborating on infor-mation literacy instruction.

  • Thumbnail for Campus collaboration from a martial arts perspective
    Campus collaboration from a martial arts perspective by Perini, Michael

    Thinkers have been applying longstanding martial arts philosophies to a variety of professional genres for years, particularly in the business realm. Where these ideas find less traction, though, is in the field of education, specifically higher education, as some of the philosophies operate better in the boardroom than in academe. However, much of the experience associated with martial arts provides an alternate prism to view conflicts and difficulties within higher education and, specifically, for my purposes, in libraries. This discussion draws on my experience as a martial artist as well as my theoretical and experiential learning in higher education and academic libraries in order to expand the conversation on collaboration.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Collaboration : how leaders avoid the traps, create unity, and reap big results
    Review of Collaboration : how leaders avoid the traps, create unity, and reap big results by Krismann, Carol

    Carol Krismann reviews Morten T. Hansen's book, "Collaboration: How Leaders Avoid the Traps, Create Unity, and Reap Big Results." The book focuses on collaborations within companies and organizations. However, some of the ideas can be used for collaborating with outside organizations. Based on the author’s fifteen years of research, it is a scholarly book with a practical orientation offering guidelines on collaboration that improves the organization and its goals.

  • Thumbnail for Vendor of the Month : a marketing collaboration
    Vendor of the Month : a marketing collaboration by Tucker, Cory, 1970- , Grays, Lateka

    Marketing library resources remains an important issue despite library reductions in staff and collections budgets. In order to maintain or expand marketing programs, libraries could do well tapping into the expertise available through the vendors supplying resources to libraries. A case study of a library marketing program called, “Vendor of the Month,” at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas explains the collaboration between the library and its vendors to increase awareness and use of selected electronic resources.

  • Thumbnail for Review of “Can library use enhance intercultural education?”
    Review of “Can library use enhance intercultural education?” by Sagàs, Jimena , Sagas, Jimena

    Jimena Sagàs reviews Joron Pihl's article, "Can Library Use Enhance Intercultural Education?" This paper places the library in the spotlight as a potential resource to address the challenging issue of providing a quality education for students regardless of social, linguistic and cultural background.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Voyant Tools
    Review of Voyant Tools by Welsh, Megan E.

    Megan Welsh reviews Voyant Tools. Voyant Tools (http://voyant-tools.org/), a text analysis tool through which the written word can be understood in new ways. Voyant Tools is a free, versatile suite of web-based, text analysis and visualization tools.

  • Thumbnail for Co-teaching relationships among librarians and other information professionals
    Co-teaching relationships among librarians and other information professionals by Shannon, Amy W. , Medaille, Ann

    This article uses the co-teaching experiences of workshop instructors at the University of Nevada, Reno Libraries as a basis for an in-depth exploration of the factors that lead to successful co-teaching arrangements among librarians and other information professionals. The experiences of these instructors demonstrate that co-teaching can provide numerous benefits: It can enhance the learning experience for students, it can provide a method for refining teaching skills, it can promote successful collaborations across departments, and it can bring innovative ideas into the classroom. Drawing on collaboration research from the Wilder Foundation, this study found that successful co-teaching relationships are characterized by factors related to environment, partnerships, process and structure, communication, purpose, resources, and external/long-term considerations. Within these seven areas, guidelines for successful co-teaching relationships have been formulated for use by librarians and other information professionals.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Beyond the silos of the LAMs : collaboration among  libraries, archives, and museums
    Review of Beyond the silos of the LAMs : collaboration among libraries, archives, and museums by Thomsett-Scott, Beth C.

    Beth C. Thomsett-Scott reviews, "Beyond the Silos of the LAMs: Collaboration Among Libraries, Archives, and Museums" by Diane M. Zorich, Günter Waibel and Ricky Erway. This OCLC Research Publication contains vital and relevant content and processes for libraries, archives, and museums (LAMs). The report provides an extensive overview of the discussions around LAM collaboration on common services and the pros and cons of close collaboration, with a special focus on academic campuses.

  • Thumbnail for Review of World Digital Library
    Review of World Digital Library by Baker, Christine

    Christine Baker reviews the World Digital Library. The Library of Congress introduced the concept of “an Internet-based, easily-accessible collection of the world’s cultural riches that would tell the stories and highlight the achievements of all countries and cultures, thereby promoting cross-cultural awareness and understanding.” This was presented to the U.S. National Commission for the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). The end result is the freely-available World Digital Library (WDL) launched in April of 2009, a highly educational and culturally rich resource for “educators, scholars, and general audiences.”

  • Thumbnail for  The collaborative shift has happened!
    The collaborative shift has happened! by Horton, Valerie

    Valerie Horton reflects on the first five years of the Collaborative Librarianship publication. We have built a strong literature base with over 135 articles, reviews, columns, and editorials examining many aspects of collaboration in libraries. Looking over the last five years of journal content, it is clear that our profession’s view of collaboration has been evolving.

  • Thumbnail for Collaborative leadership
    Collaborative leadership by Engard, Nicole C., 1979-

    On a regular basis, Nicole Engard contributes to Collaborative Librarianship. In this article, Nichole Engard discusses collaborative leadership.

  • Thumbnail for Collaborative fundraising
    Collaborative fundraising by Engard, Nicole C., 1979-

    On a regular basis, Nicole Engard contributes to Collaborative Librarianship. In this article, Nichole Engard discusses collaborative fundraising.

  • Thumbnail for Thick and thin library collaboration
  • Thumbnail for Review : Embedded librarians : moving beyond one-shot instruction
    Review : Embedded librarians : moving beyond one-shot instruction by Vella, Lia

    Lia Vella reviews the book, "Embedded Librarians: Moving Beyond One-Shot Instruction." This book is edited by Cassandra Kvenild and Kaijsa Calkins. In her review, Vella shares, "For the first time last year, my library tried an “embedded” relationship with a required freshman class. As a Reference & Instruction Librarian, I attended the lectures, worked with each of the class sections, and created and staffed a “Help Station” with a rotating display of relevant books and articles. This book, Embedded Librarians: Moving Beyond One-Shot Instruction, was, therefore, of interest to me and helped me to formulate ideas about how I wanted to implement my own program."

  • Thumbnail for Collaborative tools used to organize a library camp unconference
    Collaborative tools used to organize a library camp unconference by Lawson, Steve, 1970- , Crossett, Laura , Kraus, Joseph R.

    From July to October, 2008, Laura Crossett, Joseph Kraus and Steve Lawson organized the Library Camp of the West (http://librarycampwest.pbwiki.com/). This was an unconference that took place on October 10, 2008 at the University of Denver. The authors used many technology tools to organize the event, such as email, wikis, blogs, two tools from Google, the Doodle scheduling Website, Flickr and more. This article will explain how they used those tools to prepare for the unconference.

  • Thumbnail for Review : The social factor : innovate, ignite, and win through mass collaboration and social networking
    Review : The social factor : innovate, ignite, and win through mass collaboration and social networking by Lakatos, Holly

    Holly Lakotos reviews the book, "The Social Factor: Innovate, Ignite, and Win through Mass Collaboration and Social Networking." This book written by Maria Azua, IBM's vice president of Cloud Computing Enablement, seeks to demystify these tools and other social networking applications. Although the work purports to describe “how to choose and implement the right social networking solutions” in reality, it is an introduction to social networking concepts that may help librarians improve information literacy efforts across all patron groups.