Colorado College Logo

Digital CC

Contacting Tutt Library

  • Circulation Desk: 389-6184
  • Reference Desk: 389-6662
  • Email | IM a Librarian

Colorado College's Institutional Repository


Browsing 228 results for facet Genres with value of article.
  • Thumbnail for Review of Interdisciplinarity and academic libraries
    Review of Interdisciplinarity and academic libraries by O'Neill, Ann L.

    Ann L. O’Neill reviews, "Interdisciplinarity and Academic Libraries." This book examines the definition of interdisciplinarity and the related terms of multidisciplinarity, transdisciplinarity and cross-disciplinarity and how these can, and have, affected the work in academic libraries. The ten essays range from definitions and history of interdisciplinarity to the work implications in specific areas of today’s academic libraries.

  • Thumbnail for Crafting identity, collaboration, and relevance for academic librarians using communities of practice
    Crafting identity, collaboration, and relevance for academic librarians using communities of practice by Miller, Thurston , Belzowski, Nora F. , Ladwig, J. Parker

    Faculty/librarian collaboration is vital for librarians to remain integral to the academy. We now have an opportunity to change how we perceive ourselves and how we are perceived by faculty and administrators. There are viable solutions for expanding the role of the librarian in ways that could lead to better faculty partnerships. First, librarians must be grounded in a shared purpose and professional identity and establish a contextual framework for our own professional ‘boundaries.’ We cannot create an intersection with the knowledge and experience of others if we do not have an understanding of our own frame. Interviews and investigation of the professional literature led to a re-discovery of communities of practice. Communities of practice (CoPs) are promising tools for librarians because they can be used to develop and sustain professional identity. Once the shared purpose and practice is identified, CoPs can facilitate collaboration between librarians and faculty and develop partnerships that will increase understanding, create meaningful connections and improve perception. Communities of practice build professional empathy, and this empathetic understanding is the essence of alignment. Once our services are aligned with the needs and expectations of our users, we will become more relevant and valuable to our institutions.

  • Thumbnail for Compelling and necessary momentum : a recent timeline in open access
    Compelling and necessary momentum : a recent timeline in open access by Gaetz, Ivan

    Ivan Gaetz presents a six week timeline of developments in the open access movement.

  • Thumbnail for LCF : collaborating internationally to leap forward
    LCF : collaborating internationally to leap forward by Ayre, Lori

    In this article, Lori Ayre's discusses Library Communication Framework (LCF). LCF is a set of protocols that replicate and extend Standard Interchange Protocol (SIP2) and NCIP2 while adding web services functionality for the exchange of information.

  • Thumbnail for The quest for sustainability in international library development : the experience of the Riecken Foundation
    The quest for sustainability in international library development : the experience of the Riecken Foundation by Boyd, John , Cramer, Elizabeth

    The Riecken Foundation provides support to communities in developing countries to create sustainable partnership library programs focusing on collection development, technology applications, and assembling professional staff and volunteers. This article studies the experience of the Foundation through research gathered in interviews with Bill Cartwright, President and CEO of the Foundation, along with on-site observations at six participating libraries, and offers analysis of documentation related to these sustainability initiatives. The study also examines the transition of the Foundation from a private foundation to a public charity and the effect this has had in its programming.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Pay it forward : mentoring new information professionals
    Review of Pay it forward : mentoring new information professionals by Krismann, Carol

    Carol Krissman reviews, "Pay it Forward: Mentoring New Information Professionals." This booklet is the fourth installment in ACRL’s Active Guide Series. Written by two information professionals, Mary Ann Mavrinac, and Kim Stymest who are in a mentoring relationship, the goal is to explore each point of view and cover both the theoretical and practical aspects of mentoring.

  • Thumbnail for Crossing borders : two academic librarians and a young adult librarian collaborate to teach teens about sustainability
    Crossing borders : two academic librarians and a young adult librarian collaborate to teach teens about sustainability by McHugh, Sheli , Aulisio, George J.

    Two academic librarians from The University of Scranton’s Weinberg Memorial Library partnered with a young adult librarian from the Scranton Public Library to help plan, organize, and implement, a sustainability themed summer series of events for a teen group. This paper discusses experiences of collaborating across traditional library boundaries from perspectives of a technical services librarian, an academic reference librarian, and a young adult librarian united to work together and educate teens about going green. Various resources and literature helped build a successful summer series on sustainability and demonstrated the important role librarians can play in promoting related environmental issues. The project also formed a meaningful bond between a public librarian and two academic librarians.

  • Thumbnail for Going “all-in” for deep collaboration
    Going “all-in” for deep collaboration by Horton, Valerie

    Valerie Horton defines and discusses "deep collaboration." Deep collaboration is two or more people or organizations contributing substantial levels of personal or organizational commitment, including shared authority, joint responsibility, and robust resources allocation, to achieve a common or mutually-beneficial goal.

  • Thumbnail for Whither library consortia?
    Whither library consortia? by Horton, Valerie

    Since the 2008 recession, library consortia have been struggling. Research for an upcoming book found that 21% of consortia surveyed in a large 2007 American Library Association survey had closed or merged. Of particular note, was the well-known merger of SOLINET, PALINET, NELINET, and BCR into LYRASIS. Regional library systems were particularly hard hit by the loss of state funding, with some systems closings in California and Texas. Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Illinois combined regional library systems into small organizations. Clearly, a lot has been happening in library consortia in the past few years as borne out in several recent surveys on library consortia in America.

  • Thumbnail for Literary homecoming as collaboration :  Eastern North Carolina libraries connect with the creative sector
    Literary homecoming as collaboration : Eastern North Carolina libraries connect with the creative sector by Cook, Eleanor I. , Tennent, Blythe , Bauer, Margaret Donovan, 1963-

    This article describes an academic library’s experience developing and sustaining a literary festival as a collaborative effort. The Eastern North Carolina Literary Homecoming (ENCLH) is a year-long program of events that celebrates the culture and literature of North Carolina. With activities in 6 counties located in the mid-coastal region of North Carolina, the program provides a rich opportunity for people of this area to learn about and meet North Carolina artists. In the past the program was restricted to artists with connections to Eastern North Carolina, but the program is expanding its coverage in 2011. The program theme for 2011 will focus on the impact of environmental literature on social change. This event has been a successful collaboration between a number of cultural institutions, with Joyner Library at East Carolina University serving as the lead. Federal, state and private grant funding has been secured for several years. Key players in the mix include the editor and staff of the North Carolina Literary Review, along with staff from the local public library and members of the ECU faculty as well as librarians from other regional schools.

  • Thumbnail for The collaborative face of consortia : Collaborative Librarianship interviews Timothy Cherubini, Director for East Region Program
    The collaborative face of consortia : Collaborative Librarianship interviews Timothy Cherubini, Director for East Region Program by Cherubini, Timothy , Kraus, Joseph R.

    “Consortia are important players in the library collaborative process.” There is unlikely to be resistance to such a statement from most corners of our profession, yet what moves people (librarians and others) to positions with consortia—and what they do when they arrive there—remains a somewhat unexamined path. In this article, Collaborative Librarianship’s Joe Kraus discussed with Tim Cherubini, LYRASIS’ Director for East Region Programs, his personal experiences in positions with academic libraries as well as consortia and his movement between the two related but distinct environments. This interview is part of a series of conversations with members of Collaborative Librarianship’s Advisory Board.

  • Thumbnail for A tribute to Alan Charnes
    A tribute to Alan Charnes by Machovec, George

    Friends and colleagues offer words of tribute and good wishes on the August 2011 retirement of Alan Charnes, Executive Director of the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries.

  • Thumbnail for Review : Collaboration is key : librarians and composition instructors analyze student research and writing
    Review : Collaboration is key : librarians and composition instructors analyze student research and writing by Wheatwind, Marie-Elise

    Marie-Elise Wheatwind reviews the article, "Collaboration is Key: Librarians and Composition Instructors Analyze Student Research and Writing." This article, a collaboration between University of Georgia (UGA) composition instructors and librarians, Caroline Cason Barratt, Kristin Nielsen, Christy Desmet, and Ron Balthazor. The article presents an analysis of citation patterns from students in their First-year Composition Program (FYC).

  • Thumbnail for Improving the effectiveness of librarian-faculty collaboration on library collection development
    Improving the effectiveness of librarian-faculty collaboration on library collection development by Shen, Lan

    Librarian-faculty relations are essential to library collection development. This paper discusses, first of all, the reasons for the customary disconnect between librarians and faculty in light of their different priorities, visions, expertise, and status. In an attempt to bridge the librarian-faculty separation, a horizontal strategy is proposed focusing on financial collaborations between the library and other academic departments on campus, such as adopting the balanced budget, fair and rotated resource allocation, and prioritized investment through providing a General Reserve Fund. A vertical strategy is also proposed defined as an organizational and professional partnership through three different vertical levels, namely, the university, unit (department/program), and individual levels. At the university level, while the collaboration needs to cover the areas of book selection, evaluation, preservation, weeding, and cancellation, it should also rely on campus-wide workshops as an effective way of improving collection development and professional training. At the unit level, in addition to the department liaison model, it is advisable to organize specific forums focusing on the special needs required by different academic programs and departments. Individual level collaboration is critical to achieving the proposed goals as all institutional strategies must rely on individual efforts. Librarians should provide individual, informal, and customized outreach services.

  • Thumbnail for Librarians and health workers : partnering and collaborating to support free access to health information in Nigeria
    Librarians and health workers : partnering and collaborating to support free access to health information in Nigeria by Ukachi, Ngozi B.

    Well-being of individuals and communities depend on accessibility to accurate health information. A recent study shows that many communities in regions of Nigeria lack accessibility to this information. Building on the success of partnerships between librarians and health care workers in the delivery of health information in other parts of the world, the Nigerian situation could be greatly improved through a number of strategies, as suggested in this article.

  • Thumbnail for Collaborative fundraising
    Collaborative fundraising by Engard, Nicole C., 1979-

    On a regular basis, Nicole Engard contributes to Collaborative Librarianship. In this article, Nichole Engard discusses collaborative fundraising.

  • Thumbnail for Snapshot of library collaboration
    Snapshot of library collaboration by Gaetz, Ivan

    Editor, Ivan Gaetz is struck by the depth and diversity of collaboration represented in this issue of Collaborative Librarianship.

  • Thumbnail for Assessment of library instruction on undergraduate student success in a documents-based research course : the benefits of librar
    Assessment of library instruction on undergraduate student success in a documents-based research course : the benefits of librar by Otto, Justin , Mutschler, Chas. V., (Charles Vincent), 1955- , Victor, Paul, Jr.

    This article discusses a successful collaboration between multiple subject specialist librarians, the University Archivist and a faculty member teaching an undergraduate course in documents-based social science research. This collaborative partnership allowed for each subject specialist to expose students to specific information literacy skills they needed to be successful in their class. The authors used pre- and post-assessments to gauge student comfort level in conducting library research, as well as a rubric to assess the annotated bibliography of a student’s final research paper. The data from these assessment tools are analyzed and the results discussed. The data indicates that students benefited from the specialized instruction they received.

  • Thumbnail for Two approaches to collaborative information literacy instruction at a small engineering school
    Two approaches to collaborative information literacy instruction at a small engineering school by Cote, Conor , Juskiewicz, Scott

    Two librarians at a small STEM academic library have partnered with professors to develop and teach chemistry and writing courses. These librarians have successfully worked with professors to serve as an active presence within the classroom. This article describes the challenges of navigating the typical obstacles librarians face when attempting to integrate information literacy into the curriculum, reflects on the benefits of these collaborations, and touches on strategies for implementing similar programs at other institutions. It outlines two distinct approaches to collaborating with professors on credit-bearing information literacy courses, along with the key steps involved in planning and implementing these courses, including generating institutional buy-in, identifying potential collaborators, negotiating workload and responsibilities with collaborators, and planning to sustain courses beyond a single academic year. Suggestions for overcoming obstacles, supplemented by experience-based recommendations are discussed.

  • Thumbnail for Review : Embedded librarians : moving beyond one-shot instruction
    Review : Embedded librarians : moving beyond one-shot instruction by Vella, Lia

    Lia Vella reviews the book, "Embedded Librarians: Moving Beyond One-Shot Instruction." This book is edited by Cassandra Kvenild and Kaijsa Calkins. In her review, Vella shares, "For the first time last year, my library tried an “embedded” relationship with a required freshman class. As a Reference & Instruction Librarian, I attended the lectures, worked with each of the class sections, and created and staffed a “Help Station” with a rotating display of relevant books and articles. This book, Embedded Librarians: Moving Beyond One-Shot Instruction, was, therefore, of interest to me and helped me to formulate ideas about how I wanted to implement my own program."

  • Thumbnail for By and for us : the development of a program for peer review of teaching by and for pre-tenure librarians
    By and for us : the development of a program for peer review of teaching by and for pre-tenure librarians by Snajdr, Eric , Miller, Willie , Trinoskey, Jessica , Lacy, Meagan , Alabi, Jaena , Huisman, Rhonda , Weare, William H., Jr.

    Seven pre-tenure librarians at the University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) created a peer review of teaching (PROT) group. This article provides an overview of the library literature on PROT and identifies the commonalities and variations found in PROT programs. The development, implementation, and benefits of the PROT program at IUPUI are discussed as well as out-comes pertaining to benefits for the observed, the observer, and for the PROT group as a whole. The authors also found that the implementation of a PROT program can enhance the sense of community among colleagues.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Common ground at the nexus of information literacy and scholarly communication
    Review of Common ground at the nexus of information literacy and scholarly communication by Calkins, Kaijsa

    Kaijsa Calkins reviews, "Common Ground at the Nexus of Information Literacy and Scholarly Communication" edited by Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Merinda Kaye Hensley. This book brings together an excellent collection of writing by librarians, disciplinary faculty, and others from a wide variety of higher education settings that address the intersections between scholarly communication and information literacy instruction initiatives.

  • Thumbnail for Library collaboration – exploring new business models : an interview with Marvin Pollard
    Library collaboration – exploring new business models : an interview with Marvin Pollard by Pollard, Marvin , Tucker, Cory, 1970-

    In the past few years, academic libraries have faced many significant challenges. Due to the financial crisis, the cuts to library collections have caused an evolution in the philosophy of collecting, accessing, and delivering information. Financial constraints have resulted considerations of a “just-in-time” collection philosophy, where libraries have explored new models of collecting information and delivering content to their patrons. Collaborative Librarianship caught up with Marvin Pollard to discuss this issue.

  • Thumbnail for The Golden ratio and community
    The Golden ratio and community by Ayre, Lori

    Lori Ayre reviews the book, "The Secret Code : The Mysterious Formula that Rules Art, Nature, and Science" by Priya Hemenway.

  • Thumbnail for Could your library courier benefit from a courier management system?
    Could your library courier benefit from a courier management system? by Priebe, Lisa

    Lisa Priebe reviews Quipu Group's Library2Library software. For most people the acronym CMS refers to a system that manages website content updates. However, for those who use Library2Library software the term refers to a courier management system. Developed in 2007, Library2Library is a web-based tool used to manage the daily activities of a library courier service.