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Browsing 228 results for facet Genres with value of article.
  • Thumbnail for Colorado Springs today - Dr. Samuel Le Nord Caldwell
    Colorado Springs today - Dr. Samuel Le Nord Caldwell by Caldwell, Samuel Le Nord

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 52, Colorado Springs today - Dr. Samuel Le Nord Caldwell include: 1 b&w photo “Dr. Samuel Le Nord Caldwell” with family information; 16 uncancelled U. S. postage stamps in envelope; 15 uncancelled U. S. postage stamps in envelope; 5 articles cut from the Colorado Springs Gazette in envelope; 1 40-page, handwritten letter, dated July, 1901, addressed to “My dear Friends of the Twentyfirst Century,” signed by Samuel LeNord Caldwell, M. D.

  • Thumbnail for Sickness and healing
    Sickness and healing

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 51, Sickness and healing include: 5 business/calling cards: “Miss Marie Anderson,” “Mrs. W. H. Anderson,” “Miss Caddie Hawkins,” “A. E. Maunder,” “Lewis J. Newsome and Ethel F. Newsome”; 1 small metal object (Clamp? Hinge?) marked “Patent Pending, T. T. Lovelace, Waterbury, Conn”; 1 printed article, “God’s Promises for the Healing of the Body,” by S. S. Quinn, Keene, N. H., stamped “Mystic Healer, 305 South Tejon.”

  • Thumbnail for Success of turf transplants in restoring alpine trails, Colorado, U.S.A.
    Success of turf transplants in restoring alpine trails, Colorado, U.S.A. by Bay, Robin F. , Ebersole, James J.

    Heavy, increasing recreation on Colorado’s high peaks has created numerous social trails requiring restoration. We studied success of turf transplants 3 yr after transplanting on Mount Belford in the Sawatch Range, and Humboldt Peak in the Sangre de Cristo Range. Based on point-intercept data, sum of all vascular species’ covers was 12% to 31% lower in transplanted plots than in control areas. We found no differences in canopy density and height between transplant and control plots on Mount Belford, while both were about 40% lower in transplants on Humboldt Peak. Species richness adjusted for plot size was slightly greater in transplant plots on Mount Belford and slightly lower on Humboldt Peak. On both peaks, we found greater absolute cover of grasses in transplant plots, while forb cover was lower. After 3 yr, turf transplants effectively established vegetation cover and maintained high species richness in these communities. Whenever turf is available, e.g., new trail construction, it should be used to restore closed social trails and campsites, and turf transplants can be considered in other ecosystems for small disturbances in high-value areas where restoration would otherwise be slow.

  • Thumbnail for A Year of Listening : exploring new heights at Colorado College
    A Year of Listening : exploring new heights at Colorado College by Tiefenthaler, Jill

    Article on findings from Colorado College President Jill Tiefenthaler's "Year of Listening."

  • Thumbnail for Betwixt and between collaborative online spaces : editing and publishing a collection of essays
    Betwixt and between collaborative online spaces : editing and publishing a collection of essays by Tolley-Stokes, Rebecca, 1971-

    Rebecca Tolley-Stokes reviews several online tools that allowed her and her co-editors, who were separated by distance, to collaborate on their project and bring it to fruition.

  • Thumbnail for Sustainable collaborations : libraries link dual-credit programs to P-20 initiatives
    Sustainable collaborations : libraries link dual-credit programs to P-20 initiatives by Bruch, Courtney , Frank, Katherine

    This article argues for collaboration among academic libraries, academic departments, and high schools in order to strengthen articulation between the secondary and post-secondary sectors. It features work from a year-long project made possible by an LSTA grant and involving the Colorado State University-Pueblo Library, the English Composition Program, and several southern Colorado high schools that participate in the University’s dual-credit program titled “Senior-to-Sophomore.” This article outlines the process of using information literacy (IL) instruction to foster relationships among secondary and post-secondary instructors, improve communication between instructors and library staff within both sectors, and ultimately strengthen teaching and learning. Major challenges to an ongoing successful partnership include resources and program sustainability. The ultimate benefit, however, is the cross-institutional partnerships focused on IL instruction that benefit not only secondary to post-secondary articulation, but also the entire pre-school through graduate level (P-20) educational continuum.

  • Thumbnail for Crafting identity, collaboration, and relevance for academic librarians using communities of practice
    Crafting identity, collaboration, and relevance for academic librarians using communities of practice by Ladwig, J. Parker , Miller, Thurston , Belzowski, Nora F.

    Faculty/librarian collaboration is vital for librarians to remain integral to the academy. We now have an opportunity to change how we perceive ourselves and how we are perceived by faculty and administrators. There are viable solutions for expanding the role of the librarian in ways that could lead to better faculty partnerships. First, librarians must be grounded in a shared purpose and professional identity and establish a contextual framework for our own professional ‘boundaries.’ We cannot create an intersection with the knowledge and experience of others if we do not have an understanding of our own frame. Interviews and investigation of the professional literature led to a re-discovery of communities of practice. Communities of practice (CoPs) are promising tools for librarians because they can be used to develop and sustain professional identity. Once the shared purpose and practice is identified, CoPs can facilitate collaboration between librarians and faculty and develop partnerships that will increase understanding, create meaningful connections and improve perception. Communities of practice build professional empathy, and this empathetic understanding is the essence of alignment. Once our services are aligned with the needs and expectations of our users, we will become more relevant and valuable to our institutions.

  • Thumbnail for Literary homecoming as collaboration :  Eastern North Carolina libraries connect with the creative sector
    Literary homecoming as collaboration : Eastern North Carolina libraries connect with the creative sector by Tennent, Blythe , Cook, Eleanor I. , Bauer, Margaret Donovan, 1963-

    This article describes an academic library’s experience developing and sustaining a literary festival as a collaborative effort. The Eastern North Carolina Literary Homecoming (ENCLH) is a year-long program of events that celebrates the culture and literature of North Carolina. With activities in 6 counties located in the mid-coastal region of North Carolina, the program provides a rich opportunity for people of this area to learn about and meet North Carolina artists. In the past the program was restricted to artists with connections to Eastern North Carolina, but the program is expanding its coverage in 2011. The program theme for 2011 will focus on the impact of environmental literature on social change. This event has been a successful collaboration between a number of cultural institutions, with Joyner Library at East Carolina University serving as the lead. Federal, state and private grant funding has been secured for several years. Key players in the mix include the editor and staff of the North Carolina Literary Review, along with staff from the local public library and members of the ECU faculty as well as librarians from other regional schools.

  • Thumbnail for Peers don’t let peers perish : encouraging research and scholarship among junior library faculty
    Peers don’t let peers perish : encouraging research and scholarship among junior library faculty by Smale, Maura A. , Cirasella, Jill

    Traditional mentoring has many benefits, but peer mentoring can also offer a valuable support structure along the road to tenure. The Junior Faculty Research Roundtable (JFRR) is a peer-mentoring group for junior library faculty at the colleges and graduate schools of the City University of New York (CUNY). Created to encourage junior library faculty in their scholarly endeavors, JFRR organizes professional development events and facilitates in-person and online conversations on research, writing, and publishing. Now three years old, the group has transformed a large number of scattered junior library faculty into a supportive community of scholars.

  • Thumbnail for “Mendeley” : a review
    “Mendeley” : a review by Hicks, Alison

    Alison Hicks reviews the website Mendeley. Mendeley (http://www.mendeley.com/) is a free reference manager and academic social network that can help organize research, collaborate online, and discover the latest research.

  • Thumbnail for Library faculty and instructional assessment : creating a culture of  assessment through the High Performance Programming model
    Library faculty and instructional assessment : creating a culture of assessment through the High Performance Programming model by Farkas, Meredith G., 1977- , Hinchliffe, Lisa Janicke

    In an environment in which libraries increasingly need to demonstrate their value to faculty and administrators, providing evidence of the library’s contribution to student learning through its instruction program is critical. However, building a culture of assessment can be a challenge, even if librarians recognize its importance. In order to lead change, coordinators of library instruction at institutions where librarians are also tenure-track faculty must build trust and collaboration, lead through influence, and garner support from administration for assessment initiatives. The purpose of this paper is to explore what it takes to build a culture of assessment in academic libraries where librarians are faculty through the High Performance Programming model of organizational change. The guidelines for building a culture of assessment will be exemplified by case studies at the authors’ libraries where instruction coordinators are using collaboration to build a culture of assessment with their colleagues.

  • Thumbnail for Assessment of library instruction on undergraduate student success in a documents-based research course : the benefits of librar
    Assessment of library instruction on undergraduate student success in a documents-based research course : the benefits of librar by Victor, Paul, Jr. , Mutschler, Chas. V., (Charles Vincent), 1955- , Otto, Justin

    This article discusses a successful collaboration between multiple subject specialist librarians, the University Archivist and a faculty member teaching an undergraduate course in documents-based social science research. This collaborative partnership allowed for each subject specialist to expose students to specific information literacy skills they needed to be successful in their class. The authors used pre- and post-assessments to gauge student comfort level in conducting library research, as well as a rubric to assess the annotated bibliography of a student’s final research paper. The data from these assessment tools are analyzed and the results discussed. The data indicates that students benefited from the specialized instruction they received.

  • Thumbnail for The library as an academic partner in student retention and graduation : the library’s collaboration with the freshman year semi
    The library as an academic partner in student retention and graduation : the library’s collaboration with the freshman year semi by Sanabria, Jesus E.

    In order for academic libraries to continue to demonstrate their value in an age of accountability, developing strong collaborations is essential. Collaborations provide a first rate opportunity for librarians not only to demonstrate their value to the institution and the research practices of the faculty but to facilitate teaching students how to navigate an increasingly diverse and at times confusing information environment driven by access to several technologies. For students entering college, learning early how to navigate the library and its resources can become an important element to their academic success. Inclusion of the library faculty into the development and teaching modules of student orientations and first year seminars, such as the ones designed at the Bronx Community College of the City of New York, provide a great step in establishing our value in promoting retention and graduation.

  • Thumbnail for The collaborative face of consortia : Collaborative Librarianship interviews Timothy Cherubini, Director for East Region Program
    The collaborative face of consortia : Collaborative Librarianship interviews Timothy Cherubini, Director for East Region Program by Kraus, Joseph R. , Cherubini, Timothy

    “Consortia are important players in the library collaborative process.” There is unlikely to be resistance to such a statement from most corners of our profession, yet what moves people (librarians and others) to positions with consortia—and what they do when they arrive there—remains a somewhat unexamined path. In this article, Collaborative Librarianship’s Joe Kraus discussed with Tim Cherubini, LYRASIS’ Director for East Region Programs, his personal experiences in positions with academic libraries as well as consortia and his movement between the two related but distinct environments. This interview is part of a series of conversations with members of Collaborative Librarianship’s Advisory Board.

  • Thumbnail for Partnering with public library services : a town and gown affair
    Partnering with public library services : a town and gown affair by Cisse, Sarah

    This article describes the collaborative effort between academic reference and Public Library Services (PLS) in developing and sustaining a resume resources program at a joint-use library. The resume resources workshops are a part of the summer workshop series, Adult Computer Camp, organized by the PLS department at the Alvin Sherman Library (ASL) of Nova Southeastern University (NSU). The summer workshop series offers an innovative variety of workshops to the public featuring online and computer resources. These workshops have been a successful collaboration between these two departments at the ASL, a joint-use or “town and gown” library.

  • Thumbnail for Review of connect, collaborate, and communicate : a report from the value of academic libraries summits
    Review of connect, collaborate, and communicate : a report from the value of academic libraries summits by Hardy, Martha E.

    Martha E. Hardy reviews "Connect, Collaborate, and Communicate : A Report from the Value of Academic Libraries Summits." This report prepared by Karen Brown and Kara J. Malenfant, highlights the crucial importance of demonstrating and communicating the value of academic libraries and their impact on student learning, plus recommendations for action.

  • Thumbnail for Review of “Can library use enhance intercultural education?”
    Review of “Can library use enhance intercultural education?” by Sagàs, Jimena , Sagas, Jimena

    Jimena Sagàs reviews Joron Pihl's article, "Can Library Use Enhance Intercultural Education?" This paper places the library in the spotlight as a potential resource to address the challenging issue of providing a quality education for students regardless of social, linguistic and cultural background.

  • Thumbnail for Whose job is it anyway?
  • Thumbnail for Academic librarians and the sustainability curriculum :  building alliances to support a paradigm shift
    Academic librarians and the sustainability curriculum : building alliances to support a paradigm shift by Charney, Madeleine

    Sustainability is a fast evolving movement in higher education demonstrated by a proliferation of academic programs, co-curricular initiatives, and campus projects. Sustainability is now viewed as vital to the mission of many institutions of higher education, creating a paradigm shift that librarians can help advance with their collective interdisciplinary expertise. A review of LibGuides (online resource guides) showed that academic librarians are involved with sustainability efforts on many campuses and have a role in shaping curriculum-related activities. The author administered a survey to creators of sustainability LibGuides during the spring of 2011, posting the survey on library listservs as well. Librarians returned 112 survey responses that illustrated their engagement in sustainability activities through the forging of campus partnerships with administrators, faculty, staff from the Office of Sustainability, and library colleagues. Telephone interviews conducted with 24 of the respondents showed librarians’ wide-ranging professional interest in sustainability, and their initiatives to promote its cause, including creating resources, collections, exhibits, and events; library instruction; co-teaching with faculty; serving on sustainability committees; and collaborating with sustainability faculty and staff. However, both the survey and the interviews suggest that librarians would benefit from increased collaboration and knowledge of work undertaken elsewhere. Moreover, as the needs of students and faculty studying sustainability increase, libraries need to appoint librarians with special responsibilities in this field. Included is the author’s experience as the Sustainability Studies Librarian at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and her engagement in professional development activities related to sustainability. Best practices for librarians to advance sustainability efforts are offered.

  • Thumbnail for The evolution of e-books and interlibrary loan in academic libraries
    The evolution of e-books and interlibrary loan in academic libraries by Wicht, Heather

    As academic libraries add electronic monographs (e-books) to their collections in increasing numbers, they are frequently losing the ability to lend this portion of their collections via Interlibrary Loan (ILL) due to licensing restrictions. Recently, new options have emerged as alternatives to traditional ILL for e-books. These options introduce new opportunities for collaboration across library departments and with-in consortia. This article discusses the changing nature of resource sharing as related to e-books, examines e-book lending capabilities as they currently exist, and presents alternative models to traditional ILL, including short-term lending, purchase on demand and print on demand.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Common ground at the nexus of information literacy and scholarly communication
    Review of Common ground at the nexus of information literacy and scholarly communication by Calkins, Kaijsa

    Kaijsa Calkins reviews, "Common Ground at the Nexus of Information Literacy and Scholarly Communication" edited by Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Merinda Kaye Hensley. This book brings together an excellent collection of writing by librarians, disciplinary faculty, and others from a wide variety of higher education settings that address the intersections between scholarly communication and information literacy instruction initiatives.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Doing social media so it matters : a librarian’s guide
    Review of Doing social media so it matters : a librarian’s guide by Shields, Joel

    Joel Shields reviews Laura Solomon's book, "Doing Social Media So It Matters: A Librarian’s Guide." Shields states, "One of the dangers of writing a topical book on the fast-moving trends of the Internet and in particular, social media is becoming irrelevant before reaching publication. A popular social network of today may become outdated in six months or a new way of communicating may change the paradigm of how we think about social interaction on digital devices. Laura Solomon’s Doing Social Media So It Matters: A Librarian’s Guide approaches this topic head-on and acts as an instructional guide through the perils of successfully implementing a social media strategy within a library setting."

  • Thumbnail for Taking community to the world
    Taking community to the world by LaRue, James, 1954-

    Collaborative Librarianship is honored to have Jamie LaRue write the “Guest Editorial” for this issue. Jamie has appeared on NPR, been cited in the Wall Street Journal, Forbes and the Denver Post, was a newspaper columnist for over 20 years, and authored, The New Inquisition: Understanding and Managing Intellectual Freedom Challenges (Libraries Unlimited, 2007). From 1990 to 2014, he was director of the Douglas County (Colorado) Libraries, widely known as one of the most successful and innovative public libraries in the U.S.A. He has received numerous honors and recognitions for his contributions to libraries and communities spanning several decades. Today, Jamie LaRue writes, speaks and consults about the future of libraries. He is a candidate for the presidency of the American Library Association, the election to be held early in 2015.

  • Thumbnail for Using technology to increase community engagement
    Using technology to increase community engagement by Ayre, Lori

    Lori Bowen Ayre discusses important aspects about community collaboration and the use of technology. As Program Co-Chair for the California Library Association’s Annual Conference, she reviews all the proposed sessions and, as a result, she get to see not only what California libraries are doing but also the initiatives of which they are most proud. And what libraries seem to be most proud of these days is work they are doing in partnership with other groups in their community. Community collaborations and partnerships are inside our libraries, in our communities, and on our library websites. Many of these collaborations rely on technology in one way or another.

  • Thumbnail for Snapshot of library collaboration
    Snapshot of library collaboration by Gaetz, Ivan

    Editor, Ivan Gaetz is struck by the depth and diversity of collaboration represented in this issue of Collaborative Librarianship.