Colorado College Logo

  DigitalCC

Use AND (in capitals) to search multiple keywords.
Example: harmonica AND cobos

228 hits

  • Thumbnail for Success of turf transplants in restoring alpine trails, Colorado, U.S.A.
    Success of turf transplants in restoring alpine trails, Colorado, U.S.A. by Bay, Robin F. , Ebersole, James J.

    Heavy, increasing recreation on Colorado’s high peaks has created numerous social trails requiring restoration. We studied success of turf transplants 3 yr after transplanting on Mount Belford in the Sawatch Range, and Humboldt Peak in the Sangre de Cristo Range. Based on point-intercept data, sum of all vascular species’ covers was 12% to 31% lower in transplanted plots than in control areas. We found no differences in canopy density and height between transplant and control plots on Mount Belford, while both were about 40% lower in transplants on Humboldt Peak. Species richness adjusted for plot size was slightly greater in transplant plots on Mount Belford and slightly lower on Humboldt Peak. On both peaks, we found greater absolute cover of grasses in transplant plots, while forb cover was lower. After 3 yr, turf transplants effectively established vegetation cover and maintained high species richness in these communities. Whenever turf is available, e.g., new trail construction, it should be used to restore closed social trails and campsites, and turf transplants can be considered in other ecosystems for small disturbances in high-value areas where restoration would otherwise be slow.

  • Thumbnail for A Year of Listening : exploring new heights at Colorado College
    A Year of Listening : exploring new heights at Colorado College by Tiefenthaler, Jill

    Article on findings from Colorado College President Jill Tiefenthaler's "Year of Listening."

  • Thumbnail for Discoverability challenges and collaboration opportunities within the scholarly communications ecosystem : a SAGE white paper up
    Discoverability challenges and collaboration opportunities within the scholarly communications ecosystem : a SAGE white paper up by Somerville, Mary M. , Conrad, Lettie Y.

    The prominence of mainstream search engines and the rise of web-scale, pre-indexed discovery services present new challenges and opportunities for publishers, librarians, vendors, and researchers. With the aim of furthering collaborative conversations, SAGE commissioned a study of opportunities for improving academic discoverability with value chain experts in the scholarly communications ecosystem. Results were released in January 2012 as a white paper titled Improving Discoverability of Scholarly Content in the Twentieth Century: Collaboration Opportunities for Librarians, Publishers, and Vendors. Following the white paper, this article explores the implications for these findings through review of commissioned studies, research reports, journal articles, conference papers, and white papers published in the ensuing twelve months. Sidebars highlight especially promising cross-sector initiatives for enhancing researcher discoverability of the scholarly corpus at appropriate points in their workflow, including the NISO Open Discovery Initiative (ODI) and the Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID). Concluding reflections highlight opportunities for librarians to contribute to cross-sector collaborations that sup-port discovery of quality peer-reviewed content by improving navigation, discoverability, visibility, and usage of the scholarly corpus.

  • Thumbnail for Crafting identity, collaboration, and relevance for academic librarians using communities of practice
    Crafting identity, collaboration, and relevance for academic librarians using communities of practice by Ladwig, J. Parker , Belzowski, Nora F. , Miller, Thurston

    Faculty/librarian collaboration is vital for librarians to remain integral to the academy. We now have an opportunity to change how we perceive ourselves and how we are perceived by faculty and administrators. There are viable solutions for expanding the role of the librarian in ways that could lead to better faculty partnerships. First, librarians must be grounded in a shared purpose and professional identity and establish a contextual framework for our own professional ‘boundaries.’ We cannot create an intersection with the knowledge and experience of others if we do not have an understanding of our own frame. Interviews and investigation of the professional literature led to a re-discovery of communities of practice. Communities of practice (CoPs) are promising tools for librarians because they can be used to develop and sustain professional identity. Once the shared purpose and practice is identified, CoPs can facilitate collaboration between librarians and faculty and develop partnerships that will increase understanding, create meaningful connections and improve perception. Communities of practice build professional empathy, and this empathetic understanding is the essence of alignment. Once our services are aligned with the needs and expectations of our users, we will become more relevant and valuable to our institutions.

  • Thumbnail for Sustainable collaborations : libraries link dual-credit programs to P-20 initiatives
    Sustainable collaborations : libraries link dual-credit programs to P-20 initiatives by Frank, Katherine , Bruch, Courtney

    This article argues for collaboration among academic libraries, academic departments, and high schools in order to strengthen articulation between the secondary and post-secondary sectors. It features work from a year-long project made possible by an LSTA grant and involving the Colorado State University-Pueblo Library, the English Composition Program, and several southern Colorado high schools that participate in the University’s dual-credit program titled “Senior-to-Sophomore.” This article outlines the process of using information literacy (IL) instruction to foster relationships among secondary and post-secondary instructors, improve communication between instructors and library staff within both sectors, and ultimately strengthen teaching and learning. Major challenges to an ongoing successful partnership include resources and program sustainability. The ultimate benefit, however, is the cross-institutional partnerships focused on IL instruction that benefit not only secondary to post-secondary articulation, but also the entire pre-school through graduate level (P-20) educational continuum.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Collaboration : how leaders avoid the traps, create unity, and reap big results
    Review of Collaboration : how leaders avoid the traps, create unity, and reap big results by Krismann, Carol

    Carol Krismann reviews Morten T. Hansen's book, "Collaboration: How Leaders Avoid the Traps, Create Unity, and Reap Big Results." The book focuses on collaborations within companies and organizations. However, some of the ideas can be used for collaborating with outside organizations. Based on the author’s fifteen years of research, it is a scholarly book with a practical orientation offering guidelines on collaboration that improves the organization and its goals.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Building bridges : connecting faculty,  students, and the college library
    Review of Building bridges : connecting faculty, students, and the college library by Andersen, Patricia

    Patricia Andersen reviews Monty L. McAdoo's, "Building Bridges: Connecting Faculty, Students, and the College Library." Building Bridges gives in-depth, practical advice for librarians, new or not so new to information literacy, with tips on how to both interact with faculty and students to design successful assignments.

  • Thumbnail for Outreach : what works?
    Outreach : what works? by Ke, Irene , Essinger, Catherine

    This article reports on the design and findings of a project concerning the feasibility of a collaborative model to benchmark the marketing of electronic resources in institutions of higher education. This international project gathered 100 libraries to move in lockstep through the process of a typical marketing cycle that included running a brief marketing campaign and reporting findings to each other. The findings show good reasons and strong support for this kind of model.

  • Thumbnail for “Mendeley” : a review
    “Mendeley” : a review by Hicks, Alison

    Alison Hicks reviews the website Mendeley. Mendeley (http://www.mendeley.com/) is a free reference manager and academic social network that can help organize research, collaborate online, and discover the latest research.

  • Thumbnail for  Collaboration in the community
    Collaboration in the community by Engard, Nicole C., 1979-

    On a regular basis, Nicole Engard contributes to Collaborative Librarianship. In this article, Nichole Engard discusses the value of collaborating in our communities.

  • Thumbnail for The library as an academic partner in student retention and graduation : the library’s collaboration with the freshman year semi
    The library as an academic partner in student retention and graduation : the library’s collaboration with the freshman year semi by Sanabria, Jesus E.

    In order for academic libraries to continue to demonstrate their value in an age of accountability, developing strong collaborations is essential. Collaborations provide a first rate opportunity for librarians not only to demonstrate their value to the institution and the research practices of the faculty but to facilitate teaching students how to navigate an increasingly diverse and at times confusing information environment driven by access to several technologies. For students entering college, learning early how to navigate the library and its resources can become an important element to their academic success. Inclusion of the library faculty into the development and teaching modules of student orientations and first year seminars, such as the ones designed at the Bronx Community College of the City of New York, provide a great step in establishing our value in promoting retention and graduation.

  • Thumbnail for Collaboration for a 21st century archives : connecting university archives with the library’s information technology professiona
    Collaboration for a 21st century archives : connecting university archives with the library’s information technology professiona by Lawrimore, Erin

    As communication technologies change, so do the records being produced and acquired by the archival repositories tasked with documenting society. This article, written from the perspective of a University Archivist, discusses the need for collaboration between archivists and information technology professionals in a university library in order to manage the university’s born-digital archival records. Using specific examples of collaborative projects of University Archives and the Electronic Resources and Information Technology (ERIT) department in the University Libraries of The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, the article makes specific recommendations for overcoming challenges related to professional jargon and work practices shared by archivists and information technologists to produce a successful collaboration.

  • Thumbnail for Innovation through collaboration – the Orbis Cascade Alliance shared library management services experience : an interview with
    Innovation through collaboration – the Orbis Cascade Alliance shared library management services experience : an interview with by Bosch, Stephen , Helmer, John F. , Sugnet, Chris , Tucker, Cory, 1970-

    The Orbis Cascade Alliance is a consortium of 37 academic libraries in Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. Recently, the Alliance completed the challenging task of organizing and completing a RFP for a shared Library Management Service and, currently, is in the initial stages of implementation. Editors of Collaborative Librarianship discussed this project with John F. Helmer, the Executive Director of the Orbis Cascade Alliance.

  • Thumbnail for Leveraging strategic institutional partnerships : creating a phased learning commons at the University of Idaho Library
    Leveraging strategic institutional partnerships : creating a phased learning commons at the University of Idaho Library by Henrich, Kristin J.

    Following an energizing reorganization of the first floor, the University of Idaho Library sought additional strategies to support student learning and success. Building on previous successful collaborations with the Dean of Students Office, the Library and Tutoring Services created a model to offer peer-tutoring services in the library. Several philosophical and practical guidelines were considered, and implementation of the service, while challenging, was ultimately successful. Strategies for proposing, building, and maintaining similar partnerships with student services units are discussed, with best practices offered for other institutions seeking similar collaboration.

  • Thumbnail for Patron-driven acquisition - working collaboratively in a consortial environment : an interview with Greg Doyle
    Patron-driven acquisition - working collaboratively in a consortial environment : an interview with Greg Doyle by Tucker, Cory, 1970- , Doyle, Greg

    Patron-driven acquisition models for electronic and print books have become extremely popular in the past two years and in most cases this service has been implemented at many individual libraries. One unique collaborative model of patron-driven acquisition was created by the Orbis Cascade Alliance through a partnership with Ebook Library (EBL) and Yankee Book Peddler (YBP). This unique project is an example of libraries, consortia, and vendors working together to develop new business models during times of financial constraint, where libraries and consortia are exploring various “just-in-time” acquisition models. Collaborative Librarianship spoke with Greg Doyle about the project at Orbis Cascade.

  • Thumbnail for Partnering with public library services : a town and gown affair
    Partnering with public library services : a town and gown affair by Cisse, Sarah

    This article describes the collaborative effort between academic reference and Public Library Services (PLS) in developing and sustaining a resume resources program at a joint-use library. The resume resources workshops are a part of the summer workshop series, Adult Computer Camp, organized by the PLS department at the Alvin Sherman Library (ASL) of Nova Southeastern University (NSU). The summer workshop series offers an innovative variety of workshops to the public featuring online and computer resources. These workshops have been a successful collaboration between these two departments at the ASL, a joint-use or “town and gown” library.

  • Thumbnail for  The collaborative shift has happened!
    The collaborative shift has happened! by Horton, Valerie

    Valerie Horton reflects on the first five years of the Collaborative Librarianship publication. We have built a strong literature base with over 135 articles, reviews, columns, and editorials examining many aspects of collaboration in libraries. Looking over the last five years of journal content, it is clear that our profession’s view of collaboration has been evolving.

  • Thumbnail for Going “all-in” for deep collaboration
    Going “all-in” for deep collaboration by Horton, Valerie

    Valerie Horton defines and discusses "deep collaboration." Deep collaboration is two or more people or organizations contributing substantial levels of personal or organizational commitment, including shared authority, joint responsibility, and robust resources allocation, to achieve a common or mutually-beneficial goal.

  • Thumbnail for Whose job is it anyway?
  • Thumbnail for Evolving in collaboration : electronic thesis and dissertation workflows in North Carolina
    Evolving in collaboration : electronic thesis and dissertation workflows in North Carolina by Taber, Ann Marie , Early, Mary G.

    Thirty-seven colleges and universities in North Carolina offer advanced degrees, and most require a thesis or dissertation. The websites of thirteen (35%) indicate they accept or require electronic submission of dissertations and/or theses (ETD). How do these institutions handle the interdepartmental communication and collaboration needs of ETD programs? To begin answering this question, this study examines current practices among ETD administrators in North Carolina and in current national literature, paying special attention to communication, collaboration, workflows, and divisions of labor. The literature review surveys current (since 2003) library and higher education articles on topics related to collaboration, workflows, and divisions of labor in ETD programs. Then the authors use a brief web survey (sixteen questions) that was emailed to twenty-three individuals identified on institutional websites as being involved in the ETD program. Fifty percent of recipients completed the survey, and the results tend to support common themes found in the literature: ETD depositories require a great variety of skill sets and thus will involve multiple departments; libraries and graduate schools are primary players, but not exclusively, in ETD workflows; and communication and collaboration between departments are important from start to finish.

  • Thumbnail for Again a cottage industry
    Again a cottage industry by Gaetz, Ivan

    If Gaetz interprets correctly the views of Jason Epstein, elder statesman of the publishing world, Collaborative Librarianship in fact takes its place in the rebirthing of a cottage industry. The Random House College Dictionary defines “cottage industry” as, “an industry in which the product is made in a self-employed worker’s home (in contrast with a factory).” Beginning in the 1450's in homes and shops, printing and publishing progressed through the centuries to become enormous, multinational corporate empires. Now, all that is changing. With the emergence of the internet, social networking and mobile technologies of one kind or another, a new paradigm comes into play, a new model described by Epstein as a cottage industry long forgotten in the big business of publishing—and you are invited to be a part of it! Collaborative Librarianship invites you to become directly involved in this new cottage industry as authors, editors, reviewers, readers, responders—working where you are, anywhere in the world, creatively, autonomously, and exhibiting much diversity—interacting with information and knowledge. You have an opportunity to participate in meaningful ways in this new world of publishing anticipated by Jason Epstein.

  • Thumbnail for NISO and collaboration : a place at the table for all players
    NISO and collaboration : a place at the table for all players by Carpenter, Todd , Horton, Valerie

    Todd Carpenter, the Managing Director of NISO, the National Information Standards Organization, is a leading player in promoting research through the creation of standard and best practices related to information exchange and management. NISO provides the environment for bringing key organizations together to reach complex and often difficult agreements. As Carpenter says, “One of NISO’s most important principles is ensuring all the relevant players have an opportunity to sit at the table, in an open and fostering environment that is supported by participatory and well-established rules for engagement.” This interview is part of a series of conversations with members of Collaborative Librarianship’s Advisory Board.

  • Thumbnail for The medium is still the message
    The medium is still the message by Davis, Mitchell

    Mitchell Davis was invited by Collaborative Librarianship to contribute through a regular column. As an innovator and motivator in the field of library and non-library collaboration, Mitchell offers unique perspectives on future developments in libraries that capitalize on their resources and specializations.

  • Thumbnail for Milestones in collaboration
    Milestones in collaboration by Gaetz, Ivan

    With this issue, Collaborative Librarianship begins its fourth year of publication. The reasons for beginning the Journal continue to be relevant today, and perhaps even more compelling. In the time leading up to volume 1, number 1, (January 2009), we recognized that collaboration is a fundamental value in the practice of librarianship and that it takes many forms, from in-house to consortia cooperatives and beyond.

  • Thumbnail for Social bookmarking sites : a review
    Social bookmarking sites : a review by Barnes, Laura L.

    Laura Barnes reviews social bookmarking sites. Social bookmarking tools allow users to store, manage, search, organize, and share their bookmarks online and access them from anywhere.