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  • Thumbnail for Controls on radial growth of mountain big sagebrush and implications for climate change
    Controls on radial growth of mountain big sagebrush and implications for climate change by Enquist, Brian J. , Lamanna, Christine A. , Ebersole, James J. , Poore, Rebecca E.

    Mountain big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. vaseyana) covers large areas in arid regions of western North America. Climate-change models predict a decrease in the range of sagebrush, but few studies have examined details of predicted changes on sagebrush growth and the potential impacts of these changes on the community. We analyzed effects of temperature, precipitation, and snow depth on sagebrush annual ring width for 1969 to 2007 in the Gunnison Basin of Colorado. Temperature at all times of year except winter had negative correlations with ring widths; summer temperature had the strongest negative relationship. Ring widths correlated positively with precipitation in various seasons except summer; winter precipitation had the strongest relationship with growth. Maximum snow depth also correlated positively and strongly with ring width. Multiple regressions showed that summer temperature and either winter precipitation or maximum snow depth, which recharges deeper soil horizons, are both important in controlling growth. Overall, water stress and perhaps especially maximum snow depth appear to limit growth of this species. With predicted increases in temperature and probable reduced snow depth, sagebrush growth rates are likely to decrease. If so, sagebrush populations and cover may decline, which may have substantial effects on community composition and carbon balance.

  • Thumbnail for Whither ILL? Wither ILL : the changing nature of  resource sharing for e-books
    Whither ILL? Wither ILL : the changing nature of resource sharing for e-books by Levine-Clark, Michael

    In this editorial, Michael Levine-Clark shares his thoughts on the changing nature of resource sharing for e-books.

  • Thumbnail for Compelling and necessary momentum : a recent timeline in open access
    Compelling and necessary momentum : a recent timeline in open access by Gaetz, Ivan

    Ivan Gaetz presents a six week timeline of developments in the open access movement.

  • Thumbnail for The library as an academic partner in student retention and graduation : the library’s collaboration with the freshman year semi
    The library as an academic partner in student retention and graduation : the library’s collaboration with the freshman year semi by Sanabria, Jesus E.

    In order for academic libraries to continue to demonstrate their value in an age of accountability, developing strong collaborations is essential. Collaborations provide a first rate opportunity for librarians not only to demonstrate their value to the institution and the research practices of the faculty but to facilitate teaching students how to navigate an increasingly diverse and at times confusing information environment driven by access to several technologies. For students entering college, learning early how to navigate the library and its resources can become an important element to their academic success. Inclusion of the library faculty into the development and teaching modules of student orientations and first year seminars, such as the ones designed at the Bronx Community College of the City of New York, provide a great step in establishing our value in promoting retention and graduation.

  • Thumbnail for Collaboration for a 21st century archives : connecting university archives with the library’s information technology professiona
    Collaboration for a 21st century archives : connecting university archives with the library’s information technology professiona by Lawrimore, Erin

    As communication technologies change, so do the records being produced and acquired by the archival repositories tasked with documenting society. This article, written from the perspective of a University Archivist, discusses the need for collaboration between archivists and information technology professionals in a university library in order to manage the university’s born-digital archival records. Using specific examples of collaborative projects of University Archives and the Electronic Resources and Information Technology (ERIT) department in the University Libraries of The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, the article makes specific recommendations for overcoming challenges related to professional jargon and work practices shared by archivists and information technologists to produce a successful collaboration.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Library mashups : exploring new ways to  deliver library data
    Review of Library mashups : exploring new ways to deliver library data by Tomeo, Megan

    Megan Tomeo reviews the book, "Library Mashups: Exploring New Ways to Deliver Library Data." Editor, Nichole Engard offers a compilation of successful mashups from a variety of libraries including Yale University, Temple University, and Manchester City Library as well as companies such as LibLime. Mashups are web applications that use free and/or fee data (images, citation information, maps, etc.)—perhaps even several sets of data—and combine them to create new content.

  • Thumbnail for Editorial introduction : telling stories
    Editorial introduction : telling stories by Gaetz, Ivan

    This issue marks the start of Collaborative Librarianship’s third year of publication. The articles presented here reveal the great richness of creative thought moving librarians to develop intriguing and exciting ways of working together and of reaching out to persons and groups outside the profession of librarianship.

  • Thumbnail for Re-conceiving entrepreneurship for libraries : collaboration and the anatomy of a conference
    Re-conceiving entrepreneurship for libraries : collaboration and the anatomy of a conference by Scanlon, Mary G., 1955- , Crumpton, Michael A.

    For librarians who have worked in the field and have become innovative out of necessity, developing and creating entrepreneurial activities are not unusual. Perhaps recognizing and celebrating those achievements could change common perspectives on the entrepreneurial abilities of librarians. This idea launched the collaborative efforts of two universities to demonstrate this to be so. The libraries at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro and Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, successfully collaborated on the planning and execution of a conference to celebrate entrepreneurism within the field of librarianship. In doing so, each organization was able to promote its unique talents and give signature to the notion that librarians can be, and in fact are, entrepreneurial. The collaborative value found in this project was derived from our sense of fulfillment of our social responsibility and of celebrating entrepreneurship within the profession. This conference serves as an example of embedded collaboration versus simple logistics, and the conference planning team now looks forward to future endeavors.

  • Thumbnail for The collaborative face of consortia : Collaborative Librarianship interviews Timothy Cherubini, Director for East Region Program
    The collaborative face of consortia : Collaborative Librarianship interviews Timothy Cherubini, Director for East Region Program by Kraus, Joseph R. , Cherubini, Timothy

    “Consortia are important players in the library collaborative process.” There is unlikely to be resistance to such a statement from most corners of our profession, yet what moves people (librarians and others) to positions with consortia—and what they do when they arrive there—remains a somewhat unexamined path. In this article, Collaborative Librarianship’s Joe Kraus discussed with Tim Cherubini, LYRASIS’ Director for East Region Programs, his personal experiences in positions with academic libraries as well as consortia and his movement between the two related but distinct environments. This interview is part of a series of conversations with members of Collaborative Librarianship’s Advisory Board.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Pay it forward : mentoring new information professionals
    Review of Pay it forward : mentoring new information professionals by Krismann, Carol

    Carol Krissman reviews, "Pay it Forward: Mentoring New Information Professionals." This booklet is the fourth installment in ACRL’s Active Guide Series. Written by two information professionals, Mary Ann Mavrinac, and Kim Stymest who are in a mentoring relationship, the goal is to explore each point of view and cover both the theoretical and practical aspects of mentoring.

  • Thumbnail for RFID, GPS, and 3G : radio wave technologies and privacy
    RFID, GPS, and 3G : radio wave technologies and privacy by Ayre, Lori Bowen

    Lori Bowen Ayre discusses technology and convenience versus privacy.

  • Thumbnail for Planning from the middle out : Phase 1 of 2CUL Technical Services Integration
    Planning from the middle out : Phase 1 of 2CUL Technical Services Integration by Harcourt, Kate , LeBlanc, Jim

    The Columbia and Cornell University Libraries’ partnership is now in its fourth year. Its composite acronym (2CUL), which condenses a doubling of the two participating libraries’ initial letters, in itself reflects the very nature of the collaboration’s strategic purpose: a broad integration of library activities in a number of areas – including collection development, acquisitions and cataloging, e-resources and digital management, and digital preservation. In what is perhaps their boldest, most ambitious 2CUL initiative to date, the two libraries have begun planning for and have taken the first steps towards an integration of their substantial technical services operations. In this paper, the authors outline the goals of 2CUL Technical Services Integration (TSI), report on the first phase of the work, reflect on what they have learned so far in planning for this operational union, and look forward to the next steps of the project in which the two institutions will initiate incrementally the functional integration of the two divisions. The period covered in Phase 1 of TSI is September 2012-December 2013.

  • Thumbnail for Working together : joint-use Canadian academic and public libraries
    Working together : joint-use Canadian academic and public libraries by Sarjeant-Jenkins, Rachel , Walker, Keith

    The research purpose was to learn about existing joint use public-academic libraries in Canada including their establishment, structure, benefits, and challenges and to determine the requirements for successful partnerships. Following a literature review, a short survey was conducted to gather data on the number, location, and types of public-academic library partnerships. In-depth telephone interviews were then held with key personnel from joint use libraries to learn more about the libraries and the nature of the partnerships. The research surfaced three unique examples of joint use public-academic libraries. In addition, key requirements for successful partnerships that were posited through the literature review were supported by the research data – commitment, a shared vision, and a need that requires fulfillment. Possible limitations of the research are the initial survey’s reliance on responses from academic library directors and the survey timing. There is limited information about partnerships between Canadian public and academic libraries and no single document that brings together data on partnerships across Canada. With this study, public and academic libraries will learn of successful joint use Canadian public-academic libraries along with the key requirements for sustainable partnerships.

  • Thumbnail for Toward improved discoverability of scholarly content : cross-sector collaboration essentials
    Toward improved discoverability of scholarly content : cross-sector collaboration essentials by Conrad, Lettie Y. , Somerville, Mary M.

    By way of follow-up to earlier work in understanding and improving discoverability of scholarly content, this article reports on recent data and reflections that led to clearer definitions of discovery and discoverability, as well as deeper cross-sector collaborations on standards, transparency, metadata, and new forms of partnerships. Recent advances in discoverability are also described - from enhanced library-based web-scale searching to serving researcher needs through the Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID) registry. The article points to a 2014 SAGE white paper that presents in greater detail opportunities for wider collaboration among libraries, publishers, service providers, and researchers in the inter-est of furthering discovery, access, and usage of scholarly writings and creative work.

  • Thumbnail for Academic librarians and the sustainability curriculum :  building alliances to support a paradigm shift
    Academic librarians and the sustainability curriculum : building alliances to support a paradigm shift by Charney, Madeleine

    Sustainability is a fast evolving movement in higher education demonstrated by a proliferation of academic programs, co-curricular initiatives, and campus projects. Sustainability is now viewed as vital to the mission of many institutions of higher education, creating a paradigm shift that librarians can help advance with their collective interdisciplinary expertise. A review of LibGuides (online resource guides) showed that academic librarians are involved with sustainability efforts on many campuses and have a role in shaping curriculum-related activities. The author administered a survey to creators of sustainability LibGuides during the spring of 2011, posting the survey on library listservs as well. Librarians returned 112 survey responses that illustrated their engagement in sustainability activities through the forging of campus partnerships with administrators, faculty, staff from the Office of Sustainability, and library colleagues. Telephone interviews conducted with 24 of the respondents showed librarians’ wide-ranging professional interest in sustainability, and their initiatives to promote its cause, including creating resources, collections, exhibits, and events; library instruction; co-teaching with faculty; serving on sustainability committees; and collaborating with sustainability faculty and staff. However, both the survey and the interviews suggest that librarians would benefit from increased collaboration and knowledge of work undertaken elsewhere. Moreover, as the needs of students and faculty studying sustainability increase, libraries need to appoint librarians with special responsibilities in this field. Included is the author’s experience as the Sustainability Studies Librarian at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and her engagement in professional development activities related to sustainability. Best practices for librarians to advance sustainability efforts are offered.

  • Thumbnail for “She has a vocabulary I just don’t have” : faculty culture and information literacy collaboration
    “She has a vocabulary I just don’t have” : faculty culture and information literacy collaboration by White-Farnham, Jamie , Gardner, Carolyn Caffrey

    The authors describe difficulties pertaining to discipline-specific discourse and identity among collaborators during the process of revising the information literacy component of a first-year writing program. Hardesty’s term “faculty culture” offers a frame through which to understand resistance and tension among otherwise engaged faculty and situates this experience within the uncomfortable history between faculty and librarians who may be perceived as “inauthentic” faculty. The authors suggest ways to improve communication between librarians and writing program faculty when collaborating on infor-mation literacy instruction.

  • Thumbnail for Collaboration in eTextbook publishing : a case study
    Collaboration in eTextbook publishing : a case study by Weber, Alice , Morrow, Anne , Wimmer, Erin N.

    The need for a tailored textbook for a distance class of PhD nursing students led to a collaboration between a College of Nursing faculty member and librarians from academic and health sciences libraries. The partnership incorporated new and existing library services in the “Research with Diverse Populations” class. Librarians provided curriculum support services and facilitated the creation of an eTextbook authored by class members. The Research with Diverse Populations eTextbook was designed to be openly accessible and structured to expand as future students make additional contributions. The audience for the eBook extends beyond the course participants to a broader audience of clinicians and researchers working with vulnerable populations. The eBook collaboration is an innovative and unique approach to addressing the needs of a faculty member. It is anticipated that the collaborative process will inspire similar projects in the future.

  • Thumbnail for The librarian and the collaborative design of effective library  assignments : recommendations for daculty on question design fo
    The librarian and the collaborative design of effective library assignments : recommendations for daculty on question design fo by Sanabria, Jesus E.

    The success of library research assignments depends to some extent on the quality of the research question posed to students. Librarians can help teaching faculty craft more effective research assignments through intentional partnerships where librarians discuss with faculty how to pose well-structured research questions, what library resources are available to support the research and what a faculty member expects a student to learn from the exercise.

  • Thumbnail for Patron-driven acquisition - working collaboratively in a consortial environment : an interview with Greg Doyle
    Patron-driven acquisition - working collaboratively in a consortial environment : an interview with Greg Doyle by Tucker, Cory, 1970- , Doyle, Greg

    Patron-driven acquisition models for electronic and print books have become extremely popular in the past two years and in most cases this service has been implemented at many individual libraries. One unique collaborative model of patron-driven acquisition was created by the Orbis Cascade Alliance through a partnership with Ebook Library (EBL) and Yankee Book Peddler (YBP). This unique project is an example of libraries, consortia, and vendors working together to develop new business models during times of financial constraint, where libraries and consortia are exploring various “just-in-time” acquisition models. Collaborative Librarianship spoke with Greg Doyle about the project at Orbis Cascade.

  • Thumbnail for Taking community to the world
    Taking community to the world by LaRue, James, 1954-

    Collaborative Librarianship is honored to have Jamie LaRue write the “Guest Editorial” for this issue. Jamie has appeared on NPR, been cited in the Wall Street Journal, Forbes and the Denver Post, was a newspaper columnist for over 20 years, and authored, The New Inquisition: Understanding and Managing Intellectual Freedom Challenges (Libraries Unlimited, 2007). From 1990 to 2014, he was director of the Douglas County (Colorado) Libraries, widely known as one of the most successful and innovative public libraries in the U.S.A. He has received numerous honors and recognitions for his contributions to libraries and communities spanning several decades. Today, Jamie LaRue writes, speaks and consults about the future of libraries. He is a candidate for the presidency of the American Library Association, the election to be held early in 2015.

  • Thumbnail for Collaborative tools used to organize a library camp unconference
    Collaborative tools used to organize a library camp unconference by Kraus, Joseph R. , Lawson, Steve, 1970- , Crossett, Laura

    From July to October, 2008, Laura Crossett, Joseph Kraus and Steve Lawson organized the Library Camp of the West (http://librarycampwest.pbwiki.com/). This was an unconference that took place on October 10, 2008 at the University of Denver. The authors used many technology tools to organize the event, such as email, wikis, blogs, two tools from Google, the Doodle scheduling Website, Flickr and more. This article will explain how they used those tools to prepare for the unconference.

  • Thumbnail for Could your library courier benefit from a courier management system?
    Could your library courier benefit from a courier management system? by Priebe, Lisa

    Lisa Priebe reviews Quipu Group's Library2Library software. For most people the acronym CMS refers to a system that manages website content updates. However, for those who use Library2Library software the term refers to a courier management system. Developed in 2007, Library2Library is a web-based tool used to manage the daily activities of a library courier service.

  • Thumbnail for E-book workflow from inquiry to access : facing the challenges to implementing e-book access at the University of Nevada, Reno
    E-book workflow from inquiry to access : facing the challenges to implementing e-book access at the University of Nevada, Reno by Beisler, Amalia , Kurt, Lisa

    As e-book holdings in academic libraries increase, libraries must face the challenge of how to manage the acquisition and access of both individual and package e-book titles. While libraries have developed work-flows to effectively handle electronic journal holdings and packages, e-books do not fit neatly into those models. An e-book workflow shares facets of both monographic and electronic resource acquisition and access, with both title-level and package acquisition and management issues. This article will explore how a cross-departmental team in the University of Nevada, Reno Libraries collaborated to analyze and refine the workflow for the e-book lifecycle, from the point of inquiry through acquisition, access management, and end of life.

  • Thumbnail for Escaping the island of lost faculty : collaboration as a means of visibility
    Escaping the island of lost faculty : collaboration as a means of visibility by Viator, Van P. , Fonseca, Anthony J.

    Academic librarians are often physically and intellectually isolated at their institutions, and need to accept much of the blame. Professional literature shows that librarians continue to argue against the responsibilities of tenure, despite the fact that in two of the three usual rubrics of tenure, publication and service, they share a level playing field with teaching faculty. In addition, academic librarians will not be treated equally unless they begin to think and work outside of the physical academic library. This article argues for a multidisciplinary approach to academic librarianship, with an emphasis on collaboration as a means to develop visibility through presentations at every level, publications in multidisciplinary peer-reviewed journals, professional memberships in organizations outside of librarianship, and active, vocal committee participation. By reinventing themselves as both subject / discipline and research methods experts, academic librarians make themselves more visible scholars at their institutions.

  • Thumbnail for Librarians and health workers : partnering and collaborating to support free access to health information in Nigeria
    Librarians and health workers : partnering and collaborating to support free access to health information in Nigeria by Ukachi, Ngozi B.

    Well-being of individuals and communities depend on accessibility to accurate health information. A recent study shows that many communities in regions of Nigeria lack accessibility to this information. Building on the success of partnerships between librarians and health care workers in the delivery of health information in other parts of the world, the Nigerian situation could be greatly improved through a number of strategies, as suggested in this article.