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Browsing 350 results for facet Format with value of mixed material.
  • Thumbnail for Joyce, Mary Barkalow Holt
    Joyce, Mary Barkalow Holt by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Mary Barkalow Joyce (CC class of 1938) came with her sister and widowed mother to Colorado College from California in 1934 when her mother was offered the position as Head Resident of Bemis Hall. As an entering freshman, Miss Barkalow was offered a job as a “hasher” in Bemis. She talks about her enjoyment of Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority; her professors, particularly her female professors as role models; her introduction to social work, which became her profession; campus social life; campus athletics; Murray’s Drug Store; classes; chapel attendance; and her career in social work. She compares her college experience to that of her granddaughters who attended Colorado College. Grace Berkley Brannon (CC class of 1927) contributes to this interview.

  • Thumbnail for Winograd, Daniel Mark
    Winograd, Daniel Mark by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Daniel Winograd (CC class of 1970) grew up in Greeley, Colorado, and entered Colorado College in 1966 as a Boettcher Foundation scholar. Upon graduating from Colorado College, he attended the University of Chicago Law School, and graduated in 1973. He accepted a position as an associate attorney with Elson, Lassers and Wolff in Chicago from 1973 to 1978. In September of 1978, he moved to Colorado Springs and opened an office as a solo practitioner. At the time of this interview he was in partnership with J. Tyler Makepeace (CC class of 1969).

  • Thumbnail for Frazier, Effie Evelyn Stroud
    Frazier, Effie Evelyn Stroud by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Effie Stroud Frazier, (CC class of 1931) was one of the first African-American women to attend Colorado College and one of seven members of the well-known Stroud family to attend Colorado College. She was the first recipient of the Sachs scholarship. In her interview, Effie Frazier discusses race relations in Colorado Springs during the Depression and her experiences as a minority student at Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Hamilton, Mary Alice
    Hamilton, Mary Alice by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Dr. Mary Alice “Pinky” Hamilton first came to Colorado Springs in 1947 with her sister, Sally, and brother-in-law, Robert M. Stabler, as he joined the Colorado College faculty as a zoologist. A 1933 graduate of Elmira College, New York, Hamilton received her Ph.D. in physiology from Columbia University and from 1939 to 1941 did research at the University of Michigan Medical School. Hamilton became the associate lab director for the Colorado Foundation for Research in Tuberculosis from 1947 to 1952. She began to lecture in zoology at Colorado College in 1950, becoming assistant professor in 1958, associate professor in 1963, professor of biology in 1972, and retiring as professor emerita in 1977. She also assisted her brother-in-law, Robert Stabler, with research projects related to trichomoniasis in pigeons and falcons.

  • Thumbnail for Jones, Jean Armstrong and Jones, Gerald L.
    Jones, Jean Armstrong and Jones, Gerald L. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Jean Armstrong Jones (CC class of 1944) graduated with a B. A. degree in English and her husband, Gerald L. Jones, a member of the Naval V-12 Unit, was assigned to Colorado College from 1943-1945. Jean Armstrong Jones has a particularly long association with the college. Both of her parents graduated from Colorado College in 1899. Her father, Willis R. Armstrong, for whom Armstrong Hall is named, served as a trustee of the college from 1903 until 1956, and numerous members of her family also attended Colorado College. Gerald Jones has been associated with the Colorado Springs National Bank since 1946. Jean Jones provides memories of her childhood in Colorado Springs. Both Mr. and Mrs. Jones describe life on campus during World War II.

  • Thumbnail for Bryson, Arthur Earl
    Bryson, Arthur Earl by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Arthur Bryson was both a graduate (CC class of 1911) and an alumni trustee of Colorado College from 1948-1949. Following a 34-year career as an investment banker for Halsey Stewart and Company in Chicago, he retired in Colorado Springs in 1946, where he founded the Colorado Springs Charter Association, and the Springs Area Beautiful Association. His second wife was the former Dorothy Printup Hulbert Wing. During his time as a student at Colorado College, he was the editor of both The Tiger and The Nugget.

  • Thumbnail for Atencio, Dolores S.
    Atencio, Dolores S. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Dolores S. Atencio (CC class of 1977) graduated from Colorado College with a degree in Political Science. She attended the University of Denver College of Law, and was admitted to the Colorado Bar in October, 1981. A native of Pueblo, Colorado, Ms. Atencio discusses her strong Chicano heritage and her perspectives as a minority student at Colorado College. She actively participated in MECHA (Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano Aztlan), the Chicano student organization on the campus. In 1979, she, along with her former husband, Randy Serna (CC class of 1974) founded the Colorado College Chicano Alumni Association.

  • Thumbnail for Barnes, Otis Avery
    Barnes, Otis Avery by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936- , Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Otis Barnes taught chemistry at Colorado College from 1925-1962. He was active in the formation of the athletics policy at Colorado College, and also, along with his wife, endowed the Barnes Chemistry Scholarships for Colorado College chemistry majors. Barnes discusses the department, the curriculum, the faculty and the effect of WWII on the campus. He provides a brief history of the hockey program, including star players at the time and the involvement of El Pomar and the Broadmoor.

  • Thumbnail for Reinitz, Neale R.
    Reinitz, Neale R. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Neale Reinitz received a B.A. in English from the University of Wisconsin in 1947, an M.A. in English from Harvard in 1949 and his Ph.D. in English from University of California at Berkeley in 1958. Professor Reinitz was a member of the English department at Colorado College from 1953 until his retirement in 1991. His special interests include biking, hiking, rafting, wine, books, jazz, the Marx Brothers, cross-country skiing and photography.

  • Thumbnail for Levkulich, Mary Birovchak
    Levkulich, Mary Birovchak by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Mary came to the United States from Austria-Hungary when she was eighteen. She was born in 1896. She was the only child of six in her family who got to immigrate and tells of coming through Ellis Island by herself. She lived in New York City, and then moved to Minersville, Penn. where she met her husband, George Levkulich, also an immigrant. They moved wherever he could find work in coal mines. They moved to the Craig area in 1926 and found they had to buy 160 acres because all the homesteading land in Breeze Basin was taken. She tells many stories about: poor living conditions, learning to drive horses, raising 300 chickens, raising animals, growing crops, and butchering and storing meat. She describes "the shack" they first had on their farm and living conditions. Mary had seven children. They had several fire disasters with the chickens and crops. She talks about killing a rattlesnake, and getting rid of gophers. Mary talks about: baking bread in a coal stove, making clothes, and preserving food. She was afraid to visit her home in "Europe" because she would have to deal with the Russian Embassy. Mary died in 1990.

  • Thumbnail for Kirby, Ruby Lucile Rector
    Kirby, Ruby Lucile Rector by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Ruby Kirby's parents (sister is Leona Rector Hinricks) came to the Rangely area in 1898-99. They had three children, Ruby (born in 1902), Leona, and a son. Ruby talks about Ute Indians who visited the ranch. And she describes: home remedies, chores, play, and riding horses. The children had tutors at home and also spent winters in Grand Junction for school. Ruby describes activities at the ranch during their teenage years: house work, horses, picnics, dances, and the family band. She and her sister went to Western State College. Ruby worked in San Francisco for three years in 1927 and then returned home. She married Russel Dare in 1936, but he was shot in front of the Rangely store by a "squatter" when she was eight months pregnant. After having her daughter, she soon married Albert Kirby, a local rancher. They continued to ranch in the area until Albert died two years prior to this interview, but Ruby's daughter and family live on the ranch and she continues to move between summer and winter ranches. Ruby died in 1995.

  • Thumbnail for Hoth, Jayne White
    Hoth, Jayne White by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Jayne was born at home in Sunbeam, Colorado in 1918. Her grandmother, Sarah Farrell, came to the Sunbeam area to homestead as a single woman in 1887 from Ohio. She came at age thirty-two because she hadn't married and was considered a failure. She married a cowboy in 1890. Sarah was a practical nurse and delivered many babies in this remote area. Jayne tells stories of her grandmother and mother living on the homestead: home remedies, dances, food, outside work, and isolation in the winter. Jayne talks about her own childhood as a "tomboy." When she started school she went to a rural school and then moved to Denver to live with her grandparents. She returned to the Maybell area in 1944 at age twenty-six with one son and divorced. She married again to Carl E. "Mike" Hoth, and lived on ranches where her husband worked. Jayne cooked for the ranch hands and also worked outside with her husband. They had three children. Jayne talks about: ranch life, hobbies, and clubs. Jayne died in 1989.

  • Thumbnail for Beidleman, Richard Gooch
    Beidleman, Richard Gooch by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    A prolific writer, a much sought-after speaker, and a highly respected professor, Richard Beidleman is one of Colorado College's most notable faculty members. He taught zoology from 1957-1968 and biology from 1968-1988. His research interests centered on the role of natural scientists in frontier America and Australia, and he helped author high school and junior high school biology textbooks, among approximately 250 other published works. The Colorado Springs community knows him best as a dedicated environmental activist who fought for many years for such causes as the preservation of the White House Ranch and the Garden of the Gods Park, the prevention of strip mining along Front Range quarries, and the successful League of Women Voters lawsuit against the City of Colorado Springs regarding the Palmer deeded parks. He served on the Colorado State Parks Board for eight years, including three and a half years as its chairman and succeeded, among other things, in obtaining Muehler Ranch as a state park. The Beidleman Environmental Center at Sondermann Park was established in his honor by the City of Colorado Springs.

  • Thumbnail for Gamer, Carlton
    Gamer, Carlton by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    A noted composer and music theorist, Professor Carlton Gamer received his Bachelors in Music from Northwestern University in 1950, and his Masters from Boston University in 1951. He came to Colorado College first in 1953 as an accompanist for the dance program. From 1954 through 1960, he was a full-time instructor in the music department. He became assistant professor in 1960; associate professor in 1966; and served as a full professor from 1974 until his retirement in 1994. Besides his talents as a composer and teacher of music, Professor Gamer also has had a great interest in Asian culture and philosophy and mathematical thought. A conscientious objector, Professor Gamer counseled many young men about the draft.

  • Thumbnail for Murray, Jack G.
    Murray, Jack G. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    John Glackin “Jack” Murray (CC class of 1937/1938) graduated with a major in business. During his student days he was a member of the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity, the school band, and the staff of the Tiger newspaper, serving as business manager his senior year. His father, John W. Murray, and uncle, Joseph P. Murray, opened Murray's Drug Store in the Plaza Hotel Building (now Spencer Center) on the southwest corner of Cache la Poudre and Tejon Street in 1906. Jack Murray worked there during his childhood days and later took over the family business. Murray Drug Store served as a favorite Colorado College social center for many years and also as the college book store until Lennox House took over that function in the fall of 1941.

  • Thumbnail for Olson, Howard M.
    Olson, Howard M. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    A graduate of Colorado College (CC class of 1925), Professor Howard M. Olson taught physics at Colorado College between 1925 and 1969. He completed graduate work at the University of California at Berkeley. Olson remembers: Professors Tileston, Lovitt, Sisam, Daehler, Swart, Boucher, Wright and Presidents Duniway and Mierow. In his interview Olson also talks about classwork, fraternities (Pi Kappa Alpha - engineering), dances at the Broadmoor, Bruin Inn, his teaching philosophy, students during the late sixties, and the building of Olin Hall.

  • Thumbnail for Sondermann, Judy
    Sondermann, Judy by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Judy Sondermann (CC class of 1981) is the daughter of the late Colorado College Professor Fred A. Sondermann. Judy graduated with a B.A. in psychology, and a Certificate of Education. She played women's varsity soccer for Colorado College for four years. In 1981, she was selected for a women's college soccer team that traveled to Europe for training and competition. In the 1981-82 season, Judy was an assistant coach of Colorado College's women's soccer team. She discusses growing up at Colorado College, campus life as a student, athletics, soccer, and her father, Fred Sondermann.

  • Thumbnail for Caunt, Kay Lynn Niederhut
    Caunt, Kay Lynn Niederhut by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Kay Niederhut Caunt (CC class of 1972) came to Colorado College from her home in Denver, Colorado, and graduated with a B.A. in history. Her interview focuses on campus life as a married student, campus attitudes toward the Vietnam War, and her early involvement in politics. She was a state legislative candidate in 1974, a member of the Colorado Democratic Party's executive committee and rules committee and worked with the Colorado Springs-El Paso County CETA Manpower Planning Council.

  • Thumbnail for Spence, Jennie Mary Brown
    Spence, Jennie Mary Brown by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Jennie was born in 1897. Her parents came to the Meeker area in 1898 in a covered wagon. Her father began teaching in rural schools around the Meeker area until they moved to Meeker and had a store. They also started a homestead on Flag Creek. Jennie tells many stories about her mother who: made hats, ran the store, sewed clothes, had boarders, was Dr. French's nurse, took care of other people's children, made funeral shrouds, and "laid out people." Jennie tells stories about her childhood: play, chores, basketball, piano, and riding horses. She taught school for three years before she married. Jennie describes: home remedies, puberty, births of children, and women who died in childbirth. She and her husband, Joe Spence, lived on several ranches and she describes the living conditions in the early years: coal oil lights, carrying water, milking cows, making butter, and making soap. She went on roundup with her husband from September to November. They had two children. She describes a typical day in the summer. Jennie began teaching again after her children left home. Jennie enjoyed painting. Jennie died in 1995.

  • Thumbnail for Powell, Ila Alma Bowman
    Powell, Ila Alma Bowman by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Ila's parents came to the Rangely area to homestead on Douglas Creek in 1908. Her mother made friends with Ute Indians who passed through the area hunting along the White River. As a child she remembers: caring for bum lambs, milking cows, irrigation, the garden, planting potatoes, clearing sage brush, making deer jerky, washing clothes, baking bread, ironing, and clothing (dresses). She remembers: home remedies, injuries, 1918 flu, and puberty. For fun they fished, rode horses, made horse tail ropes, went to dances, and visited with neighbors. She went to school in Utah, Rangely, and Grand Junction. She regrets quitting school in Junior High to get married (1927) to Lester Powell. She and her husband moved to Seattle, Washington for three years, but returned to homestead on Douglas Creek during the Depression. They had 10 children. They dug their own coal mine and helped build the school. Ila expresses attitudes towards: working mothers, birth control, children, and not having a career. Ila died in 2008.

  • Thumbnail for Savage, Rosamay Hodges
    Savage, Rosamay Hodges by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Rosamay was born in 1898 on a ranch near Juniper Springs. Her mother, Bell, lived as a young woman in Maybell and the town may have been named after her and her sister, May. Rosamay's father was the foreman on the K-Diamond Ranch and there were no nearby neighbors. She and her sister rode horses and played with dolls. After her father died, they moved to Maybell where her mother owned a drugstore. She describes visiting an Indian camp at Cross Mountain. Rosamay also talks about: clothing for school, riding, home remedies, and dances. Her education ended after one year in high school for financial reasons. She later went to business college and worked for three years before marrying. Her husband, George Savage, was the chief of police in Boulder, Colorado. When he retired they bought a ranch near Rangely and she joined the Home Demonstration Club. She had no children. She enjoyed textile painting and quilting. Rosamay died in 1993.

  • Thumbnail for Shepherd, Virginia M.
    Shepherd, Virginia M. by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Virginia's father came to Meeker in 1898 and her mother came in 1901. They settled on a ranch near Buford (on the White River east of Meeker). Virginia tells stories about her mother's difficult adjustment to the West after growing up in Virginia. Virginia attended a rural school about three miles away. After her older sister died of pneumonia because they couldn't get her into town soon enough, the family moved to Meeker. Virginia describes her life as a child: play, clothing, travel to Virginia, church youth group, and high school parties. She talks about the 1918 flu: many people in Meeker died. Virginia describes instructions on becoming a "lady" and her mother's "reading club." Virginia graduated from college and talks about her experiences at Colorado College and Colorado State College of Education (Greeley). She later earned an M.A. at Colorado College. She talks about her teaching and counseling experiences in the Meeker schools. Virginia died in 1994.

  • Thumbnail for James, Minnie Louise Eberle
    James, Minnie Louise Eberle by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Minnie came to Craig in 1910 with her family when she was fourteen. They lived on a ranch near Craig until they moved to their homestead south of Craig. There were nine children and Minnie was the oldest girl, responsible for many of the household and babysitting chores. She talks about: hauling water from the river, cooking on the coal stove, the cattle/sheep wars, clothing, play, school, and taking care of her sick mother. Minnie boarded in town for high school and talks about activities. She had one year of college and took the state teacher's exam. She then taught in a rural school but didn't like teaching. Minnie moved to California with a friend and went to a business college. She worked as a secretary/bookkeeper for a time and then returned to Craig in 1941. She married Lewis James and moved to the James ranch. Her husband died a year and a half later of pneumonia. She moved back into Craig and worked as a secretary/bookkeeper until retirement. Minnie died in 1989.

  • Thumbnail for Service, Eleanor Rugler
    Service, Eleanor Rugler by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Eleanor was teaching school in Missouri and wanted to make more money by moving west. She came to the Pagoda School in 1927 at nineteen. She boarded with a family, but saw few other people except at holidays and dances. They traveled in the winter by sled. She taught in rural schools at Lime Kiln near Meeker, Axial and Hamilton between Meeker and Craig, and in the Meeker schools. Eleanor completed two years of college and many extension courses. She tells many stories of her years in rural schools: taking her breast fed child with her, her school pet deer, making teaching materials, driving to the schools from Meeker in the winter, becoming a foster parent for two of her students. She married a rancher, James F. Service, but wanted to continue to teach while she raised her children. She had three children and two foster children. Eleanor died in 1985.

  • Thumbnail for Smith, Wilma Gertrude Crawford
    Smith, Wilma Gertrude Crawford by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Wilma's father arrived in the Meeker area to homestead in 1885. Her mother arrived in a covered wagon with her sister. She remembers coming to town on a sled for the mail. She talks about her life on the ranch: play, work inside and outside, clothing, and washing clothes. And she describes a typical day's activities. She attended a winter rural school 1 1/2 miles away. She talks about dances, sleigh rides, and ice skating. Wilma liked to play baseball - she was the catcher. She talks about the first automobiles, which they had to put up on blocks in the winter. Wilma went to college at the University of Colorado at Boulder for two years, taking French, physics, and English. Then she married and had one child. Her husband died in an accident when her daughter was two years old. She lived with her mother in Meeker and worked at various jobs (housecleaning, babysitting, as a clerk, in a laundry, and in a garage). Wilma died in 1993.