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  • Thumbnail for McCue, Lillian de la Torre Bueno
    McCue, Lillian de la Torre Bueno by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Lillian Bueno McCue, whose pen name is Lillian de la Torre, was born in New York City on March 15, 1902, received her B.A. at New Rochelle College in 1921, an M.A. from Columbia University in 1927, and another M.A. from Harvard in 1933. Her field of study is 18th Century English literature. Her husband George McCue, whom she married in 1932, taught English at Colorado College from 1935 to 1962. Lillian McCue was a well-known mystery writer of several novels, numerous short stories, and 12 plays, most notably Goodbye, Miss Lizzie Borden. She referred to herself as a histo-detector, researching unsolved mysteries of the past, particularly using the 18th century characters of Dr. Sam Johnson and his friend Boswell as central figures.

  • Thumbnail for Wood, Richard E.
    Wood, Richard E. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    After 30 years as Colorado College's Director of Admissions, Richard E. Wood retired in 1991. He was known as the dean of admissions directors on a national level, due to his remarkable success in his field. Born in 1927 in East Orange, New Jersey, Wood graduated from Dickinson College in 1952, and received an M.A. from Columbia Teachers College in 1953. After positions at Pratt Institute and Denver University, he came to Colorado College in 1959 as Assistant Director of Development. Named Admissions Director in 1961, he also served several years as Registrar and Financial Aid Director.

  • Thumbnail for Carter, Harvey L.
    Carter, Harvey L. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Carter joined the faculty in the Department of History at Colorado College in 1945. Carter talks about people who were at the college during that time (Hershey, Abbott, Malone, Worner). Many of the students were WWII veterans. Because faculty salaries were very low (highest salary was $3600), Carter organized the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter and worked with President Gill to draft salary ranks and faculty tenure policies. Carter talks about the effects of the McCarthy era on the Colorado College campus, and President's Gill's defense of those targeted. He resigned as History Department Chair in 1959. Carter was curator of the Hulbert Collection of Western Americana. He talks about his own writing: western fur trade, Hafen sketches of mountain men, Kit Carson, limerick writing, and his philosophy of teaching.

  • Thumbnail for Roberts, Carl L., Jr.
    Roberts, Carl L., Jr. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Carl Roberts came to the field of psychology after serving in the Navy, going to college for a short time, working in the business world, and then returning to college. From graduate school at the University of Missouri, Roberts came to Colorado College as assistant professor in 1957 to teach experimental psychology. He became associate professor in 1961 and full professor in 1967. He was interested in the experimental analysis of behavior, behavior modification, learning theory, animal behavior, and the philosophy of science. With student help, he built an experimental lab for the department. He was successful in increasing funding for the department by interesting Presidents Worner and Benezet in the department’s research. He also received several national grants.

  • Thumbnail for Boyce, Wallace Campbell
    Boyce, Wallace Campbell by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Wallace Boyce was a faculty member in the Romance Languages Department at Colorado College from 1950 until his retirement in 1979. He received his B.A. from Williams, his M.A. from Middlebury, and his Ph.D. from Princeton in 1956. Before coming to Colorado College, Boyce served in the Army at Camp Carson in the 1940s, and was an intelligence officer in the European Theater in the Second World War. He also coached the Colorado College tennis team from 1953 to 1958, sang in the Colorado College choir for many years and was chairman of the Romance Languages department between 1958 and 1967.

  • Thumbnail for Krutzke, Frank A.
    Krutzke, Frank A. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Krutzke was a member of the English department at Colorado College from 1939-1971. He talks about his impressions of professors Daehler, Ellis, McCue, Bramhall, Abbott, and Gilmore. Krutzke discusses life at Colorado College during World War II, including student Bert Stiles, a pilot in the war who wrote a well known book, Serenade to the Big Bird. He gives impressions of the administration after the war and his involvement with the formation of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter at Colorado College. He also discusses the changes that President Benezet brought to the College, the McCarthy era, Colorado College students from 1939 to the 1970s, and the Block Plan.

  • Thumbnail for Johns, Gilbert R.
    Johns, Gilbert R. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor of Psychology Gilbert R. Johns, who received his Ph.D. from the University of Indiana, came to Colorado College in 1962, following a teaching appointment at Ohio University. His specialties have been in sensory psychology and perception and the history of science and psychology. Professor Johns served as the Dean of the Colorado College Summer Session for 15 years, from 1965 to 1981. He was director of the Colorado Opera Festival from 1970 to 1978. From 1982 to 1992 he was critic at large for the Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph. He retired in 1996.

  • Thumbnail for Mierow, Dorothy
    Mierow, Dorothy by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Dorothy Mierow was the daughter of the late Charles C. Mierow, who was Professor of Classics at Colorado College and President of the College from 1925 to 1934. When he returned to Colorado College to reintroduce classics in the mid-fifties, Dorothy Mierow returned with him. She served as lecturer in geography in 1955 and then as curator of the Colorado College Museum from 1956 to 1962. After that time, she lived in Nepal as a Peace Corps volunteer, and later as a regular faculty member in the geography department of the Prithvi Narayan campus in Pokhara, where she established a museum library in memory of her parents. Ms. Mierow recalls life on campus during her childhood and her father's presidency including the construction of Shove Chapel, the Forestry School and many faculty members including: Albright, Drucker, Parker, Blakely, and Malone.

  • Thumbnail for Seay, Albert
    Seay, Albert by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Albert Seay came to Colorado College in 1953, after completing his dissertation at Yale. Dr. Seay was professor of music and head of the music department at Colorado College until 1982, when he retired. He established the Colorado College Music Press in 1955, which focuses on publishing translations and transcriptions of music. His interview discusses the growth of the Music Department, the Music Press, and the changes in music students during his career.

  • Thumbnail for Graham, Oma Jensen
    Graham, Oma Jensen by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Oma's parents came to Blue Mountain, Colorado, near the Utah border, in 1902 to homestead. Oma was born in 1909 in Jensen, Utah (named after her grandfather.) She talks about: Ute Indians, illness, accidents, home remedies, children's play and work, hard winters, Mormon crickets, and work with cattle. They left the homestead in 1926 and moved to the White River (Meeker). She attended high school in Jensen and Meeker, and began her life of working on ranches, inside and outside. She married June Graham when she was twenty-one and he was thirty-seven. They had known each other for three years. They worked on ranches in the White River area. She speaks about: dances, living conditions, cooking, always "enjoying her work", problems with elk, and isolation from neighbors in winter. They worked for the Roosevelt family on their ranch for a time. Oma had an accident with a grubbing hoe which later resulted in the amputation of her leg. Oma tells many stories about experiences in rural Colorado. Oma died in 1988.

  • Thumbnail for Jackson, Helen
    Jackson, Helen by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Helen Jackson, born in Colorado Springs in 1890, gave this interview at the age of 87. Her father, William Sharpless Jackson, was a close associate of General Palmer, and he served on the Colorado College Board of Trustees between 1874 and 1917. Her brother, William S. Jackson, Jr., served as a trustee for 50 years between 1925 and 1975. One of seven children, Miss Jackson was the daughter of William S. Jackson, Sr.'s second wife, Helen Fisk Banfield, and a great-niece of his first wife, the writer Helen Hunt. Miss Jackson graduated from Cutler Academy in 1907, received her B.A. at Vassar in 1912, and an M.A. from Colorado College in 1915. She taught school for many years at the Dudley Road School in Massachusetts, before returning to Colorado Springs around 1942 to become custodian of the Jackson family home at 228 East Kiowa. When the home was torn down in 1961 and reconstructed at the Pioneer Museum, Miss Jackson became the interpreter of its history to thousands of museum visitors, especially area school children.

  • Thumbnail for Vickerman, Mary Carolyn Bloom
    Vickerman, Mary Carolyn Bloom by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Mary Carolyn Bloom Vickerman (CC class of 1932) was a native of Colorado Springs and her husband, Sam Vickerman (CC class of 1933), was a native of Westcliffe, Colorado. Mrs. Vickerman worked for the college almost from the time she became a student. As an undergraduate, she was an assistant at Coburn Library, as well as in a number of biology labs. In 1933 and 1934, she served as the night librarian at Coburn Library, and then from 1935 through 1940, was the secretary to the Colorado College Men's Athletic Department. In 1946, she began working at the Colorado College Bookstore in Lennox House, and in 1949 became the manager of the bookstore until her retirement in 1969. She was a life member of the Woman's Educational Society at Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Corley, Fern Pring
    Corley, Fern Pring by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Fern Pring Corley came to Colorado Springs in 1907, attending Garfield Elementary School and Colorado Springs High School. Corley (CC class of 1922) majored in chemistry. Her father, William J. Pring, was a pioneer rancher in the Pikes Peak region, and her husband's father, Mr. W. D. Corley, built the Corley Mountain Highway, now called the Gold Camp Road, on the roadbed of the old Short Line Railroad to Cripple Creek. Mrs. Corley describes student life at Colorado College including tuition, the Bruin Inn, student jobs, football, women's sports, freshman hazing, pranks, campus buildings, literary societies and Monument Valley Park. Included in the interview are descriptions of her early childhood in Colorado Springs, her family's early history in the area, and her husband's businesses.

  • Thumbnail for King, Jackson F.
    King, Jackson F. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Jackson F. King (CC class of 1927) majored in economics, and then went on to a successful career in investments and banking. While a student at Colorado College, he was a member of the Beta Theta Pi fraternity, the business manager of the student yearbook, the Nugget, the treasurer of the senior class, and voted Most Likely to Succeed by his classmates. He was also employed at a theater on Pikes Peak Ave where he ran the motion picture projector. He talks about fraternity activities and student life. He recalls professors Jacob Swart, Ralph Gilmore, Lewis Abbott, A.P.R. Drucker, Dean of Students Charlie Brown Hershey, and President Mierow.

  • Thumbnail for Dunn, Ellen Marie Dalrymple
    Dunn, Ellen Marie Dalrymple by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Ellen was born in Lipol(?) New Mexico on September 6, 1907. Her parents had twelve children. Her father had a stroke shortly after they moved to Meeker in hopes of buying a ranch. Soon they moved to Rifle where the older brothers and sisters, including Ellen, worked to support the family (drugstore clerk, babysitting). She talks about reading, home remedies, illness, education, and puberty. Ellen married Phil Dunn at twenty-three. Her husband worked for the Colorado State Highway Dept. They moved all over the state as roads were built. She describes: rustic housing, cooking, cold winters, road crew communities, and moving often. She lived in Rangely in a tent for a time during the oil boom. She describes the community and the building of the roads. They finally settled in Grand Junction where her husband worked in the pipe business. She describes: women's clubs, activities, marriage, divorce, and working. Ellen died in 1989.

  • Thumbnail for Bowers, Wilber Lamb
    Bowers, Wilber Lamb by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Mr. Wilber "Bill" Lamb Bowers was a well-known Colorado Springs photographer. His maternal grandfather was Henry Lamb, a pioneer chemist and assayer who taught in the Colorado College Chemistry Department and who was the photographer of the famous early Cutler Hall photo. Bill Bowers' mother also taught in the Chemistry Department, and his father, Clarence Bowers, taught in the College Conservatory of Music from 1896 to 1905. Bill Bowers was a 1927 graduate of the University of Arizona, served in the U.S. Army during World War II, and, after the war, established a photography business in Colorado Springs with his brother-in-law, Lloyd Knutson. Knutson-Bowers Photographers had a long association with Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Chrisler, Ethel La Kamp
    Chrisler, Ethel La Kamp by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Ethel's father came to the White River area in 1883 and her mother arrived in 1900 from Iowa for her health. Ethel was born in 1904 and grew up on ranches on the White River. She talks about: household chores, outdoor chores, hard winters; transportation; rural school; flu of 1918; home remedies; clothing; community life. She worked on a ranch after eighth grade until attending business college at nineteen. She married Tim Chrisler at twenty-two and lived on various ranches where her husband worked. They had two children. She talks about: coal/wood stoves, gas lamps, food storage, quilting groups, and church. They later owned a motel in Meeker. Ethel died in 1995.

  • Thumbnail for Young, Betty Ann
    Young, Betty Ann by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Betty Young was born October 22, 1919 in Cleveland, Ohio and graduated from Grinnell College with a B.A. in Physical Education in 1942 and from University of Colorado with an M.S. in Physical Education in 1951. She came to Colorado College in 1956 as instructor and director of the Women's Physical Education program until her retirement in 1975. She discusses development of women's sports and Title IX.

  • Thumbnail for Kawcak, Julia Biskup
    Kawcak, Julia Biskup by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Julia's parents settled on a homestead in Breeze Basin near Craig in 1908. Her parents were Austrian immigrants and had six children. There was a large Catholic community in Breeze Basin and Elk Head, the areas where families gathered for church (in a tent) and in homes for dances and activities. She describes: her mother's trip from Austria, the homestead cabin, her father's jobs, the J.W. Hugas store in Craig, "Mormon crickets," chores, play, school, clothes washing, and teenage activities. Julia married Paul Kawcak at sixteen and describes a "wedding shivaree." Paul was a coal miner from Walsenburg and many of his friends followed him to Craig to farm and ranch. She describes their homestead: clearing the land, building the house, and digging the well. Her husband worked in the mines while she worked the homestead with their nine boys and seven girls. She talks about: milking cows, cooking, making clothing, Catholic Church activities, dances at the school, and home remedies. Julia died in 1987.

  • Thumbnail for Savage, Rosamay Hodges
    Savage, Rosamay Hodges by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Rosamay was born in 1898 on a ranch near Juniper Springs. Her mother, Bell, lived as a young woman in Maybell and the town may have been named after her and her sister, May. Rosamay's father was the foreman on the K-Diamond Ranch and there were no nearby neighbors. She and her sister rode horses and played with dolls. After her father died, they moved to Maybell where her mother owned a drugstore. She describes visiting an Indian camp at Cross Mountain. Rosamay also talks about: clothing for school, riding, home remedies, and dances. Her education ended after one year in high school for financial reasons. She later went to business college and worked for three years before marrying. Her husband, George Savage, was the chief of police in Boulder, Colorado. When he retired they bought a ranch near Rangely and she joined the Home Demonstration Club. She had no children. She enjoyed textile painting and quilting. Rosamay died in 1993.

  • Thumbnail for Eddy, Ina Dalrymple
    Eddy, Ina Dalrymple by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Ina was born in Hurley, New Mexico in 1916 into a family of twelve children. When she was two they moved to Meeker, Colorado and her father died when she was six. They then moved to Rifle where she attended school. The family was very poor after father's death and Ina talks about: little medical care, home remedies, puberty, deaths of children from TB, spinal meningitis, years of deprivation and sadness, and describes the death of her closest sister from spinal meningitis. Ina married John H. Eddy when she graduated from high school. After having three children, one premature, she found she was RH negative. The family moved around Colorado for her husband's jobs until settling in Rangely where he worked in the Texaco oil field. She describes the early years of the town of Rangely during the oil boom: streets, and schools. They lived in a Texaco company house near the field. Ina worked in the school cafeteria for a number of years. In later years, she and her husband lived in several places in the West for his employment with the government. She missed watching her grandchildren growing up. Ina died in 1988.

  • Thumbnail for Smith, Wilma Gertrude Crawford
    Smith, Wilma Gertrude Crawford by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Wilma's father arrived in the Meeker area to homestead in 1885. Her mother arrived in a covered wagon with her sister. She remembers coming to town on a sled for the mail. She talks about her life on the ranch: play, work inside and outside, clothing, and washing clothes. And she describes a typical day's activities. She attended a winter rural school 1 1/2 miles away. She talks about dances, sleigh rides, and ice skating. Wilma liked to play baseball - she was the catcher. She talks about the first automobiles, which they had to put up on blocks in the winter. Wilma went to college at the University of Colorado at Boulder for two years, taking French, physics, and English. Then she married and had one child. Her husband died in an accident when her daughter was two years old. She lived with her mother in Meeker and worked at various jobs (housecleaning, babysitting, as a clerk, in a laundry, and in a garage). Wilma died in 1993.

  • Thumbnail for Paploulas, Leona
    Paploulas, Leona by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Leona was born in Greece, coming to America in 1913 when she was eight years old. She talks about: Ellis Island ; sheep herding with her husband, John; trailing sheep; cooking and rearing children; hauling water for washing; limited access to church services; other Greek families in the area; good medical care; good health; the death of one of her daughters and husband.

  • Thumbnail for Associated Charities - Edward Evans-Carrington
    Associated Charities - Edward Evans-Carrington by Evans-Carrington, Edward

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 5, Associated Charities - Edward Evans-Carrington include: 1 23-page, handwritten letter, dated July 29, 1901, addressed “To the Citizens of Colorado Springs of the Twenty First Century, Greeting:” signed by Edward Evans-Carrington, Secretary and Manager for the Office of Associated Charities; 1 business card: “Rev. E. Evans-Carrington”; 1 b&w photo: “Portrait of Rev. Edward Evans-Carrington”; 1 1-page, typewritten letter of recommendation for Evans-Carrington, signed by Theodore P. Day, President of Day Realty and Investment Co.; 1 printed form: “Daily Register of Applications”; 1 printed record card; 1 printed copy of “Report of the First Annual Meeting” October 9, 1899; 1 printed copy of “Report of the Second Annual Meeting” October 15, 1900.

  • Thumbnail for Social life - Elizabeth Cass Goddard
    Social life - Elizabeth Cass Goddard by Goddard, Elizabeth Cass

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 13, Social life - Elizabeth Cass Goddard include: 1 b&w photo: “Elizabeth Cass Goddard (Mrs. Francis W. Goddard)”; 1 11-page, handwritten letter, dated July 27, 1901, addressed “My dear Twenty-First Century Women,” signed by Elizabeth Cass Goddard.